Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Daily Dose

Hurricanes & Your Health

1:30 to read

The last week has been a tough one for Texans, and especially for those who live in Houston and along the Texas Gulf Coast.  Having my son, brother and mother all with houses in Houston, I have been watching the “Harvey” situation quite closely. Fortunately, my family is lucky enough not to have flood damage and they have not had to leave Houston.  But, too many other families have suffered flooding and have been forced to evacuate their homes and seek refuge in shelters not only in Houston, but in Dallas where I live as well. 

 

There are many families who are now living in very close quarters where they may be for sometime…as it will take weeks and months if not years to recover from this disaster and to rebuild the homes, schools, churches and businesses that have been either damaged or destroyed. 

 

The necessary relocation of families and children into shelters is also “a perfect storm” for the possibility of the spread of infectious disease. This is an important time in which managing the spread of illness and infection is paramount. What this means is that EVERYONE needs to be up to date on their immunizations to prevent the spread of vaccine preventable diseases. 

 

If you have ever “skipped” a vaccine by choice or missed a vaccine, now is the time to get your child’s vaccines updated. This is not only for those who have had to evacuate, but for everyone, as infectious diseases are spread outside of the shelters and as well.  We pediatricians are working in the shelters to try and make sure that everyone is vaccinated as they arrive, but there are those who are too young to be vaccinated and others who do not have their medical records to ensure accuracy of their vaccines. It is an arduous process.

 

But, for the public health system which will be stretched even more so during the flood recovery, vaccines are one of the most important ways to protect people. It only takes one person who might get mumps, measles or whooping cough to spread it to hundreds of others….all living in close proximity. These people will then also leave their shelter to go to school, church the store or even a temporary job where they may put others at risk, you never know if you might be exposed.

 

Lastly, it is really time to get those flu shots!!! The last thing we need is an early flu season with a large group of un-immunized people…and most doctors have already received shipments of flu vaccine.

 

Please please pray for these families who have lost so much and protect everyone by immunizing your children (and yourself).  

 

 

Daily Dose

What is Stomach Flu?

1.30 to read

I have seen a lot of patients in recent weeks with complaints of “stomach flu”.  Just to be clear the “stomach flu” really is not FLU at all and has nothing to do with “flu/influenza”.  The stomach stuff is actually called gastroenteritis, and is typically caused by a virus.  If you have been watching the news, you have heard about yet another cruise ship where many passengers and crew have been sickened and the boat had to return to port. 

Most gastroenteritis causes vomiting, diarrhea, and stomach cramps.  It is pretty miserable.  The most common cause of the stomach “bug” is a virus called norovirus. Norovirus is now the most common cause of gastroenteritis in the United States. Rotavirus was previously the most common cause of viral gastroenteritis, but since the rotavirus vaccine has been introduced for infants, rotavirus has now been surpassed by norovirus.  Viruses are really smart, sneaky and strong (which is called virulent in medical terms). 

Norovirus makes you feel awful (who likes to vomit?)  and is very easy to pick up. Where it takes exposure to many viral particles to get sick from some viral illnesses, a recent study in The New England Journal of Medicine found that as few as 10-100 norovirus particles may cause disease. It is a very efficient virus and may even be acquired by breathing in the viral particles. (gross example, someone vomits and you are in the room and breathe the virus -  think about your child spewing vomit). 

Norovirus peaks in the 6-18 month old child. By 5 years of age 1 in 6 children will have seen their doctor for vomiting/diarrhea caused by norovirus. 

The key to combating norovirus is hydration.  The virus typically lasts several days with vomiting usually shorter than the diarrhea.  Treat vomiting with frequent sips of clear liquids and increase the volume of liquid over time. Once your child is tolerating liquids and vomiting has stopped you can let them eat. If your child is over the age of 1 year and diarrhea is a big problem, I would restrict dairy for a couple of days as well. Probiotics may help as well. 

Knowing that norovirus can be transmitted by hand to mouth as well, good hygiene is important....especially after the bathroom...so make sure those little hands are washed.

Daily Dose

Cold & Cough Relief!

1:30 to read

Although it is just getting really cold across the country, it feels as if we have been in full cold and cough season for awhile.  The office sounds like what I call “kennel cough” as every child seems to be coughing…. even those who are just coming for check ups.

Parents often ask, “what is the best way to keep from catching a cold?” and the answer continues to be, “wash your hands and try not to touch your hands to your eyes, nose and mouth”.  Easy enough for an adult (well maybe not), but trying to tell your toddler not to put their hands in their nose or mouth is nearly impossible! That is one reason that children get so many colds in the first several years of life. Toddlers typically get the most colds as they have just started having playmates with whom they share not only toys but their germs…all part of growing up.

I remind parents that coughs are there for a reason. While they are a huge nuisance, and cause a lot of sleepless nights for both the child and parent, a cough is there to keep the lungs clear, and a cough is actually protective. In other words, coughing helps you clear the lungs of mucus that comes with a cold and helps to prevent pneumonia and secondary infections.  But, with that being said, learning to cover your mouth when you cough is not only polite, but it is also protective for others. It is a big day when your children learn to cover their mouths with the crook of their arms (better than the hand). Who knew as a parent this would be a milestone for your child?

Whenever your child is sick and has a cough and cold it is important to not only listen to their cough but to actually observe how they are breathing.  Parents send me videos or voicemails of their child coughing, but I am usually more interested in seeing their chest and watching their breathing. Your child may have a huge productive cough and sound terrible, but have no respiratory distress. With that being said, your child may also have a tiny little non-productive cough and be struggling to breath. In most cases the visual is more important than the audible.

To help symptoms like stuffy noses, try irrigating your child’s nose with Little Remedies® Sterile Saline Nasal Mist and then suctioning his or her nose to clear the mucus and make it easier for him or her to breath, a warm bath or shower before bed to open up airways and a cool mist humidifier in the bedroom.

Don’t panic if your child gets sick, as each time they fight off a cold and cough they are actually boosting their immune system…small victories.  It is not unusual for a toddler to get 6 - 7 colds in one season (and their parents get half as many as that from them). Once your child turns about 3 you will see that he or she doesn't get a cold every other week and also seems to handle the viruses a bit more easily.

If your child has any difficulty breathing you need to call your pediatrician! For more information on these products visit www.littleremedies.com.

 

 

 

 

Daily Dose

Shingles in Childhood?

1:30 to read

Is it possible for children to come down with shingles? I recently saw a 2 year old with a most interesting history who then developed a weird rash.   Funny thing, I read an article shortly after seeing this child that described his case perfectly, only wish I had seen this the week before.

So, this 2 year old complained that his leg hurt. Enough pain that he limped and woke up at night crying that his thigh hurt. He had no history of trauma and also was otherwise well, in other words no fever, vomiting, cold symptoms etc.

After several days of watching him without resolution of his pain the mother noticed 3 little spots on his thigh, which she thought might be a bite. The little boy was seen and the diagnosis of herpes zoster (shingles) was considered.  In children the differential diagnosis of localized leg pain in the absence of a rash would not normally include shingles.

According to the pedi dermatologist (that I consulted) shingles in children occurs more frequently on their lower extremities (not for adults) and may involve the back on the same side.   Unlike adults, most cases of zoster in children are only mildly painful and resolve fairly quickly.

Well, this little boy didn’t read the book and his rash continued to get worse and spread, and was quite painful for days. Prior to this, he was a perfectly healthy little boy and had received his first varicella vaccine when he was 1.  

Since the widespread use of the varicella vaccine (chickenpox vaccine, see old post), the incidence of chickenpox has decreased dramatically, and vaccination should also reduce the risk of developing shingles later in life. In otherwise healthy children shingles (zoster) tends to develop at a younger age among vaccinated children than in those who have had a “natural” chickenpox infection.  When shingles occurs after vaccination it represents either a new infection with wild-type virus (an exposure to chickenpox or shingles) or reactivation of the vaccine virus.

Once a child has received 2 doses of varicella vaccine as recommended, the immunity is “boosted” and should further reduce the risk of developing shingles. Varicella–zoster virus can be transmitted via contact with skin lesions of those who have either chickenpox or shingles.  Infection is less likely after exposure to shingles. Transmission of the virus occurs until all lesions have crusted over. In this case, the little boy was ultimately started on an oral anti-viral therapy with slow resolution of his rash and pain and a return to normal around his house.

Note to self: “weird” pain may precede the rash in herpes zoster by several days.  Even though unusual, herpes zoster may occur in a healthy child who no history of varicella exposure and who has received all or part of their chickenpox vaccine.

That’s your daily dose for today. We’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Helping a Child With Croup

With all of the illness going around that seems to be flu and RSV I was surprised to see a toddler today with symptoms more suggestive of viral croup. Croup is another one of those pesky viruses. Most children will experience croup at least once in their toddler years. Croup causes that "seal like" barking cough, and is very alarming when it awakens both you and your child in the middle of the night.

Croup causes swelling of the upper airway, which causes the voice to be hoarse and the airway to swell (not the lungs) and makes your child have that pronounced seal like cough. Children often seem perfectly well when they go to bed and then awaken coughing. The best treatment is to grab a book and your child and make a beeline to the bathroom and turn the shower on hot to fill the room with steam. Sit in the steam and read a book to calm your child down and help quiet the cough. If the steam treatment does not seem to be helping (and you are now out of hot water) try taking your child outside into the cool night air. Both the humidity from the steamy shower and the change in temperature from hot to cold will help reduce the airway swelling and calm your child's cough. Make sure that you look at your child's chest to how they are breathing. Despite the loud sound, they should look fairly comfortable and should not show signs of respiratory distress or stridor (a distinct sound made when you child breathes in). If they are having any respiratory distress, call the doctor as they may need to be seen and are sometimes given steroids to help with the upper airway swelling. Because this is a viral infection antibiotics won't help. Most children have the croupy cough for a night or two and then improve and will then have a little cold. When older children and adults get this virus they are usually only hoarse and develop a cold. That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

How to Treat A Vomiting Child

We are definitely in the throes of "sick season" in our office and with that comes a lot of kids with vomiting. I remember the first time that one of my own children vomited.

We were in Target, he was about two and he had said he "was sick". Now, seeing that he was not very specific and did not elaborate, I just went on shopping. Several minutes later, as he sat in the cart (with seat belt fastened), he just looked at me wide eyed and suddenly vomited. This is the moment as a parent that you understand the difference between babies that "spit up", and true, projectile vomiting! Now what do you do once your child has vomited (besides rush out of Target as fast as you can)? Once a child has vomited it is important not to give them anything else to eat or drink, for at least 30 to 45 minutes. That means even if they are "begging" for a drink, as you will probably see it come right back at you if you do. After waiting, you want to begin re-hydrating with clear liquids. Not a good idea to pull out the milk or food yet. In an infant you can use Pedialyte, which is an oral electrolyte solution, and instead of breast milk or formula you can try feeding your infant about an ounce of Pedialyte every 10 to 15 minutes and see if they can keep Pedialyte down. In toddlers and older children I use Gatorade, as it is not quite as "salty" and kids seem to take it better. Again, frequent small sips of Gatorade while you wait to see if the vomiting is persistent. Don't go too quickly on giving them larger volumes. The key is small amounts, frequently, which are easier to handle. As your child keeps down the Pedialyte or Gatorade you can increase the volume that they are taking and decrease the frequency. The main thing you are trying to do with a child of any age is to keep them from getting dehydrated and their vomiting is typically due to a viral illness affecting their GI tract. Because it is typically a virus that is the culprit for nasty vomiting, it just takes time to get through the illness. There is no "miracle" cure, and watching your child vomit, or cleaning up the vomit that invariably is usually not in the toilet, is one of the worst parenting jobs. That being said, there are very few children who will not experience vomiting at least once or twice during their childhood, so you need to keep "clear liquids" on hand in the pantry. Having powdered Gatorade around is a lifesaver at 2 a.m when your four-year-old wakes up and throws up. If you are giving the clear liquids, and your child tolerates larger volumes, but then vomits again later on, you just back up and start all over with smaller amounts more frequently. It is somewhat like a "balancing act" to give enough that they are hydrated, but at the same time to not give too much at one time that they vomit again. Slow and steady is the mantra. You should always be looking for your child to have tears, a wet and moist mouth (put your finger in there, it should come out with some saliva on it), and urine. It is often hard to tell if a child in diapers has had a wet diaper as they will not be "soaking" the diaper and smaller amounts of urine are "wicked" with the new super absorbent diapers. Children will also be pitiful after vomiting and may seem "lethargic" to you, but if they are an infant and can smile and make good eye contact or they are an older child who can tell you they feel terribly and don't want to drink Gatorade or play with their blocks they are probably not dehydrated. If in doubt, give your doctor a call to discuss what is going on. After using Pedialyte and Gatorade, and your child has not vomited for six to eight hours you can try adding some formula or breast milk, or other liquids such as chicken soup or a Popsicle. I still would not start solid food until the child has kept down other liquids. We parents all worry if our children don't "eat" but the fluids are the important part, and as we all know, a day without out chicken nuggets or peanut butter will be okay. Keep up the fluids!! If your child continues to vomit despite your best efforts with "slow and steady" fluids you need to call the doctor. We have plenty of patients that we see everyday to make sure they are hydrated, and to even watch them while they take fluids in our office. Occasionally, when all else fails we will have to hospitalize a child for IV hydration. Oh yes, remember to wash your hands frequently as these nasty viruses are contagious and parents will often find themselves getting sick after their children. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

Play
601 views in 11 months
Fight the Flu

The Facts About Flu Season

Daily Dose

Vomiting Kids

1:30 to read

Pick a virus ….and it is probably circulating in your area!  Seems we are at the peak of upper respiratory season, influenza like illness season and also vomiting and diarrhea season. In other words, lots of sick kids right now.

 

I just started seeing a lot of vomiting again!!  It is the worst for both the child and the doctor’s office where it seems many a child has vomited either in the car, coming up the elevator or in the exam room.  YUCK for all.

 

Remember, norovirus is the most common virus that causes vomiting and diarrhea and it is VERY contagious. Not only via “dirty hands” but it is also airborne…so in other words, those standing near by a child who is vomiting (parents, other sibs) are probably being exposed as well. That is the main reason you probably see an entire family who gets sick almost simultaneously.  

 

If your child vomits….DO NOT give them anything to eat or drink for at least 30 min. I know that is hard as they are asking for a drink,  but you need to give their tummy a minute to “recover” before challenging them with a few sips of Pedialyte or Gatorade.  A SIP is the key word too….tiny amount to start in hopes that they do not vomit again.  

 

I just saw a 6 year old little boy who had been vomiting several times during the night.  His Dad said that he had given him Zofran to help stop the vomiting (this is a prescription).  I use a lot of Zofran in children who are vomiting as it can go under the tongue.  But after the Zofran his son felt better….so he gave him strawberries and a waffle!! Surprise? He vomited again!!

 

Don’t be fooled and start trying to feed your child too quickly after they are vomiting. I know parents worry that “their child is not eating”, but fluids are the important part of staying hydrated. As one little boy told me, “ it feels like there are grasshoppers in my tummy”!! So well put. I grumbling tummy needs time to heal and frequent sips of clear liquids (no dairy) are the best way to prevent dehydration. As your child tolerates a small volume you can go up a bit and gradually increase the amount that they take.  I usually wait a good 4-6 hours after a child has successfully tolerated fluids before I even consider giving them food. Then I start with crackers, noodles or something bland (that I also don’t mind cleaning up) in case they vomit again.  

 

You are just wanting to make sure your child stays hydrated…tears, saliva and urine!  Keep washing those hands. 

Daily Dose

The Truth About Antibiotics

1:30 to read

Despite warmer than normal temperatures in much of the country it is certainly already cough and cold season. Our office background music is already a lot of coughing coming from children of all ages…and a few of their parents too. In fact, a few of our nurses and docs are fighting a fall cold as well.

 

This makes it timely to discuss (once again) the difference between a cold which is a viral infection and a bacterial infection (example strep throat).  Viruses are NOT treated with antibiotics!! In other words, antibiotics are not useful when you have the common cold. Asking your doctor to put you on an antibiotic “just in case “ it might help is not advised, and doctors should be taking the time to explain the difference between a viral infection and a bacterial infection, rather than writing an unnecessary antibiotic prescription.  

 

While some people (fewer and fewer young parents) still think an antibiotic is necessary, the overuse of antibiotics has been called “one of the world’s most pressing public health problems”s, by the CDC. Not only does the overuse of antibiotics promote drug resistance, it may also cause other health concerns as well. While antibiotics kill many different bacteria, they may also kill “good bacteria” which in fact help the body to stay healthy. Sometimes, taking antibiotics may cause diarrhea and may even allow “bad bacteria” like clostridium difficile to take over and cause a serious secondary infection.  

 

At the same time that there are too many antibiotic prescriptions being written for routine viral upper respiratory infections, a new study in JAMA also found that bacterial infections (sinusitis, strep throat, community acquired pneumonias), are not being treated with appropriate “first line” antibiotics such as penicillin or amoxicillin.  Of the 44 million patients who received an antibiotic prescription for the treatment of sinusitis, strep throat, or ear infections, only 52% were given a prescription for the appropriate first line antibiotic. When a doctor prescribes a broader spectrum, often newer antibiotic, instead of the recommended first line drug, they too are responsible for increasing antibiotic resistance.

 

So, you should actually be happy when your pediatrician reassures you that your child does not need an antibiotic, and that fever control with an over the counter product, extra fluids and rest will actually do the trick to get them well.  I “brag” about my patients who have never taken an antibiotic…..as they have never had a bacterial illness, and tell their parents how smart they are for not asking for an antibiotic “just because”.

 

At the same time, if your child does have a bacterial infection, ask the doctor if they are using a “first line” drug and if not why…? It could be because your child has drug allergies to penicillins, or that your child has had a recent first line drug and has not improved or has had ‘back to back” infections necessitating the use of a broader spectrum antibiotic.  Whatever the reason, always good to ask.

 

Keep washing those hands, teach your child about good cough hygiene and run don’t walk to get your flu vaccines….November is here and flu usually won’t be too far behind.

 

 

  

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

When should you get your flu shot?

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.