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Your Teen

10 Reasons Teens Act The Way They Do

2:30

Anyone in the midst of raising a teen knows that the adolescent years can be some of the most difficult to get through and understand.

As a parent or guardian of a teenager that wants to be more independent, but also needs supervision and guidance, the times can be challenging indeed.

If that’s the position you find yourself in, you may be asking – what’s going on in that youngster’s brain? Actually, there’s a lot happening!

There are several scientific reasons an adolescent brain can be similar to a toddler’s: After infancy, the brain's most dramatic growth spurt occurs in adolescence. Here’s 10 things you may not know about your teen’s brain.

10. Critical period of development. Adolescence is generally considered to be the years between 11 and 19. It’s easy to see the outward changes that occur in boys and girls during this time, but inside, their brains are working on overdrive.

"The brain continues to change throughout life, but there are huge leaps in development during adolescence," said Sara Johnson, an assistant professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Parents should understand that no matter how tall their son has sprouted or how grown-up their daughter dresses, "they are still in a developmental period that will affect the rest of their life," Johnson told LiveScience

9. The growing brain. Scientists used to believe the greatest leap in neuronal connections occurred in infancy, but brain imaging studies show that a second burst of neuronal sprouting happens right before puberty, peaking at about age 11 for girls and 12 for boys.

The adolescent's experiences shape this new grey matter, mostly following a "use it or lose it" strategy, Johnson said. The structural reorganization is thought to continue until the age of 25, and smaller changes continue throughout life.

8. New Thinking Skills. This increase in brain matter allows the teenager to become more interconnected and gain processing power, Johnson notes.

If given time and access to information, adolescents start to have the computational and decision-making skills of an adult. However, their decisions may be more emotional than objective because their brains rely more on the limbic system (the emotional seat of the brain) than the more rational prefrontal cortex.

"This duality of adolescent competence can be very confusing for parents," Johnson said, meaning that sometimes teens do things, like punching a wall or driving too fast, when, if asked, they clearly know better.

Sound familiar?

7.  Teen tantrums. While teens are acquiring amazing new skills during this time, they aren’t that good at using them yet, especially when it comes to social behavior and abstract thought.

That’s when parents can become the proverbial guinea pig. Many kids this age view conflict as a type of self-expression and may have trouble focusing on an abstract idea or understanding another's point of view.

Particularly in today’s heavy media influenced world, teens are dealing with a huge amount of social, emotional and cognitive flux says Sheryl Feinstein, author of Inside the Teenage Brain: Parenting a Work in Progress (Rowman and Littlefield, 2009.)

That’s when they need a more stable adult brain (parents) to help them stay calm and find the better path.

6. Intense emotions. Remember the limbic system mentioned earlier (the more emotional part of the brain)? It’s accelerated development, along with hormonal changes, may give rise to newly intense experiences of rage, fear, aggression (including towards oneself), excitement and sexual attraction.

Over the course of adolescence, the limbic system comes under greater control of the prefrontal cortex, the area just behind the forehead, which is associated with planning, impulse control and higher order thought.

As teens grow older, additional areas in the brain start to help it process emotions and gain equilibrium in decision-making and interpreting others. But until that time, teens can often misread parents and teachers Feinstein said.

5. Peer pressure. As teens become better at abstract thinking, their social anxiety begins to increase.  Ever wonder why your teen seems obsessed with what others are thinking and doing?

Abstract reasoning makes it possible to consider yourself from the eyes of another. Teens may use this new skill to ruminate about what others are thinking of them. In particular, peer approval has been shown to be highly rewarding to the teen brain, Johnson said, which may be why teens are more likely to take risks when other teens are around.

Friends also provide teens with opportunities to learn skills such as negotiating, compromise and group planning. "They are practicing adult social skills in a safe setting and they are really not good at it at first," Feinstein said. So even if all they do is sit around with their friends, teens are hard at work acquiring important life skills.

4. Measuring risk.  "The brakes come online somewhat later than the accelerator of the brain," said Johnson, referring to the development of the prefrontal cortex and the limbic system respectively.

At the same time, "teens need higher doses of risk to feel the same amount of rush adults do," Johnson said. Not a very comforting thought for parents.

This is a time when teens are vulnerable to engaging in risky behaviors, such as trying drugs, sex, getting into fights or jumping into unsafe water.

So what can a parent do during this risky time? "Continue to parent your child." Johnson said. Like all children, "teens have specific developmental vulnerabilities and they need parents to limit their behavior," she said.

It’s when being a parent to your child instead of trying to be their “friend” is more difficult but much more important for their physical and emotional safety.

3. Yes, parents are still important. According to Feinstein, a survey of teenagers revealed that 84 percent think highly of their mothers and 89 percent think highly of their fathers. And more than three-quarters of teenagers enjoy spending time with their parents; 79 percent enjoy hanging out with Mom and 76 percent like chilling with Dad. That’s not 100%, but it’s probably more than you thought.

One of the tasks of adolescence is separating from the family and establishing some autonomy, Feinstein said, but that does not mean a teen no longer needs parents – even if they say otherwise.

"They still need some structure and are looking to their parents to provide that structure," she said. "The parent that decides to treat a 16 or 17 year old as an adult is behaving unfairly and setting them up for failure." 

Listening to your teen and being a good role model, especially when dealing with stress and the other difficulties life can present, can help your teen figure out their own coping strategies.

2. Sleep. Ah, yes, sleep. Although teens need 9 to 10 hours of sleep a night, their bodies are telling them a different story. Part of the problem is a shift in circadian rhythms during adolescence: It makes sense to teen bodies to get up later and stay up later, Johnson said.

But due to early bussing and class schedules, many teens rack up sleep debt and "become increasingly cognitively impaired across the week," Johnson said. Sleep-deprivation only exacerbates moodiness and cloudy decision-making. And sleep is thought to aid the critical reorganization of the teen brain.

"There is a disconnect between teen’s bodies and our schedules," Johnson said.

Shutting down the electronics an hour before bedtime has been shown to help teens as well as adults get to sleep quicker and sleep better. No computer, TV, video games or cell phones.

1.The “I am the Center of the Universe” syndrome. You may have noticed that your teen’s hormones are causing quite a bit of havoc. Experts say that’s to be expected. But you may still wonder- what the heck is going on with my kid?

The hormone changes at puberty have huge affects on the brain, one of which is to spur the production of more receptors for oxytocin, according to a 2008 issue of the journal Developmental Review.

The increased sensitivity caused by oxytocin has a powerful impact on the area of the brain controlling one’s emotions. Teens develop a feeling of self-consciousness and may truly believe that everyone is watching him or her. These feelings peek around age 15.

While this may make a teen seem self-centered (and in their defense, they do have a lot going on), the changes in the teen brain may also spur some of the more idealistic efforts tackled by young people throughout history.

"It is the first time they are seeing themselves in the world," Johnson said, meaning their greater autonomy has opened their eyes to what lies beyond their families and schools. They are asking themselves, she continued, for perhaps the first time: What kind of person do I want to be and what type of place do I want the world to be?

Until their brains develop enough to handle shades of grey, their answers to these questions can be quite one-sided, Feinstein said, but the parents' job is to help them explore the questions, rather than give them answers.

And there you have it. Teen’s brains are exploding with new data, confusing signals and dueling desires. It’s a tough time in one’s development- but rest assured, what you teach them by example and compassion as well as how you gingerly help guide them will last a life-time. Even when you do the best you can, there are no guarantees that they will turn out the way you’re hoping they will – they are after all- individuals with a will and a mind of their own. But now you know a little more about why your teen acts the way they do.

Story Source: Robin Nixon, http://www.livescience.com/13850-10-facts-parent-teen-brain.html

Your Teen

Stop Yelling at Your Teenager!

2.30 to read

I’m going to go out on a limb and say that anyone who has a child has yelled at him or her at one time or another. As parents, we’ve all lost our patience when we believe our child is misbehaving. If ever there is a time when parents and kids are standing at the crossroad of “Listen to me” and “I don’t need to”, it’s during the teenage years.

Tempers often ignite with harsh words being said.  

While you may be trying to make an important point, aggressive yelling and screaming only pushes your child away and may be doing much more harm than good according to a new study.

An analysis involving nearly 1,000 two-parent families and their adolescent children suggests that such harsh verbal lashings not only don't cut back on misbehavior, they actually promote it.

The end result: an uptick in the kind of adolescent rage, stubbornness and irritation that escalates rather than stops or prevents disobedience and conflict.

"Most parents who yell at their adolescent children wouldn't dream of physically punishing their teens," noted study author Ming-Te Wang, an assistant professor with the department of psychology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Education. "Yet, their use of harsh verbal discipline -- defined as shouting, cursing or using insults -- is just as detrimental to the long-term well-being of adolescents," he said.

"Our findings offer insight into why some parents feel that no matter how loud they shout, their teenagers do not listen," Wang added. "Indeed, not only does harsh verbal discipline appear to be ineffective at addressing behavior problems in youth, it actually appears to increase such behaviors."

Wang and his co-author, Sarah Kenny of the University of Michigan, report their findings in the current issue of the journal Child Development.

The researchers were particularly interested in kids between 13 and 14 years old so they focused on 976 primarily middle-class families in Pennsylvania with young adolescent offspring, all of whom were already participating in a long-term study exploring family interaction and adolescent development. A little more than half the families were white, while 40 percent were black.

The teen participants were asked to disclose recent behavioral issues such as in-school disturbances, stealing, fighting, damaging property or lying to their parents.

Their parents were asked how often they used harsh verbal discipline such as yelling, screaming, swearing or cursing at their child. Most importantly, if they called their child names like “dumb” or “lazy.”

The teens were also asked to what degree they felt “warmth” in their relationship with their parents. Researchers inquired about the amount of parental love, emotional support, affection and care the kids felt like they received from their parents. Both teens and parental depression were tracked.

The study points out that the children who were on the receiving end of the harsh verbal attacks experienced an increase in anger and a drop in inhibitions. Those two reactions prompted an intensification of the very things that parents were hoping to stop – such as lying, cheating, stealing or fighting.

"Parents who wish to modify their teenage children's behavior would do better by communicating with them on an equal level," Wang said, "and explaining their rationale and worries to them. Parenting programs are in a good position to offer parents insight into how behaviors they may feel the need to resort to, such as shouting or yelling, are ineffective and or harmful, and to offer alternatives to such behaviors."

Parents get frustrated with their children and vice versa. None of us behave perfectly all the time. Raising your voice because you are frustrated is one thing, name calling and screaming is quite another.

Imagine if you were at work and your boss screamed at you, called you names and cursed at you because he or she didn’t like how you did something. That may have actually happened to you – remember how you felt, or think about how you would feel. Humiliated, angry and sad are the most common reactions people have.  

Children are trying to find their way in life; parents are their guides. The next time you feel you’re on the verge of screaming or saying hurtful things to your child - walk away. Give yourself time to cool down and find a better way to communicate.

People say kids are resilient and get over things quickly. Many are able to bounce back when bad things happen, but that saying is too often used to excuse bad behavior on a parent’s part. If you’ve crossed the line with your child, say you’re sorry and come up with better ways to handle your frustration and anger.

Words and tone matter and the best teaching method is by example. You can help your child learn what love, patience, tolerance, compassion and respect are by being an example of those very qualities.

Source: Alan Moses, http://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/misc-kid-s-health-news-435/yelling-at-insulting-teens-can-backfire-on-parents-study-679863.html

Daily Dose

E-Cigarettes

1:30 to read

E- cigarettes which were a relatively obscure curiosity only 5 years ago are now available at not only “vape shops” but are also easy found at gas stations and pharmacies and the e-cigarette market has exploded. Unfortunately,  with the increased availability of e- cigarettes, there has been a steady rise in adolescent e-cigarette use (vaping).  

 

The Surgeon General stated, “exposing the developing brain to nicotine has been shown to alter its structure and function in a way that introduces long-lasting vulnerability for addiction to nicotine and other substances of abuse”. Yearly studies in high school students about their use of e-cigarettes showed that the percentage of students reporting e-cigarette use in the past 30 days went from 1.5% in 2011 to 16% in 2015.  The use of e-cigarettes by teens is becoming a major public health issue.

 

In a study recently reported in JAMA (Journal of the American Medical Association), 10th grade students were surveyed in the Los Angeles public schools and found that about 37% of 10th graders have used e-cigarettes. In the same study it was reported that “teens who vaped frequently were about 10 times more likely to become regular smokers six months later, compared to teens who never vaped”. Additionally, “20% of the regular e-cig users transitioned into frequent smokers, while less than 1% of kids who had never vaped smoked cigarettes at follow-up”. It would seem from this and other studies that e-cigarettes may serve as a “gateway” to smoking cigarettes.

 

Those teens who were more frequent “vapers” might sensitize their brain to the addictive effects of nicotine and find even more “pleasure” when they start using cigarettes and may progress to adult smokers.

 

The FDA published its “deeming” rule and regulatory authority over e-cigarettes in May of 2016, and banned the sale of e-cigarettes to minors, as well as requiring warning labels on e-cigs. But the FDA did not ban e-cigarette TV ads, nor did it address the role of flavoring in attracting youths to use e-cigarettes.  (flavors such as cotton candy and gummy bear - really targeting teens) . Youth oriented advertising, not only on TV, but in stores and on the internet must be addressed as well, as studies again show that greater exposure to ads is associated with higher odds of e-cigarette use. 

 

So…once again parents  and pediatricians)  need to be discussing the use of e-cigarettes, “vaping” and life long risk for nicotine addiction.   

Daily Dose

Marijuana Use

1:30 to read

The legalization of marijuana in a majority of states for both medical or recreational use is making marijuana use more and more prevalent. It  has also made it incumbent for pediatricians to have conversations with teenage patients (and parents) about the harmful effects of marijuana use. 

 

We are now in the in the era of legalization of marijuana, and I find myself having more and more conversations with teenage patients who “think that weed is acceptable and safer than alcohol”.  That statement alone is worrisome. In fact, I “hear” that many teens are using marijuana on a daily basis, and do not realize or are in denial about any long term deleterious effects of daily marijuana use.

 

“Marijuana is not a benign drug, especially for teens. Their brains are still developing and marijuana can cause abnormal and unhealthy changes” according to a just published clinical report from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).

 

Studies have shown that teens who use marijuana on a regular basis may develop serious mental health disorders including addiction and depression. (Some teens are wrongly trying to  self-medicate their own anxiety and depression with a depressant).  Marijuana may also decrease memory and concentration, as well as causing attentional and problem solving issues.  Going to school “high” is just not conducive to academic success.

 

There are also studies that have shown that addiction may be related to daily marijuana use.  17% of people who use marijuana in adolescence may become addicted and that number may increase to 50% for teen who smoke marijuana daily. Daily alcohol use and marijuana use are both harmful but do effect the brain in different ways.  

 

But even knowing those statistics, teen surveys done by the U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services found that there is decreasing concern for the risk of using marijuana once or twice a week among 12-17 year olds.

 

Parental use of marijuana is equally concerning. Parents not only expose their child to second hand smoke, but seeing parents using marijuana recreationally makes a child more likely to use marijuana themselves. Just like alcohol, being “high” on marijuana makes it difficult to parent and to provide a healthy home environment for a child.

 

Lastly, in my own years of practicing pediatrics I have seen more than a handful of teens who have had serious drug problems….they will all tell you their drug use did not begin with cocaine or meth or even heroin…..they all say it was marijuana that started them down the terrible path of drug addiction.

 

While there is a place for marijuana use in medicine for those with certain chronic conditions or for the management of reducing the side effects chemotherapy, marijuana use is not harmless and will never be.

 

Talk to your teens about drug use and specifically marijuana use…legalization does not make it safe. It is a slippery slope for sure.

Your Teen

Helping Teens Cut Down on Sugary Drinks

2.00 to read

Want to help your teen shed his or her addiction to high-sugar drinks? A new study says that when adolescents are shown the calorie content, and how long they will have to vigorously exercise to burn off those calories, many teens decide to make a different choice as to what they drink.

The study was published in the American Journal of Public Health.

"Most consumers underestimate the number of calories in a can of soda, and they often do not realize that such calories can add up quickly," lead researcher Sara Bleich said in a press release about the study.

Researchers set up in a convenience store and used 3 methods to see if they could discourage teens from choosing drinks packed with sugar. In the first method they posted a sign that noted there are 250 calories in a typical bottle. The second sign noted that the bottle contains about 10% of an average teen’s daily-recommended calorie intake. The third sign told them that they would have to jog for about 50 minutes to burn off the calories.

The results were that all three methods discouraged teens from buying the sugary drinks by approximately 40%, but the third method had the biggest impact. When teens knew how much they would have to jog to burn off the calories, 50% chose water or diet soda instead of the high-sugar drinks.

The size of soda drinks has changed over the years. Most can drinks are 12 ounces, but bottled drinks are usually 20 ounces, with some being as large as 1 liter (34 oz.)

Super sized fountain drinks and “Gulp” drinks can be anywhere from 28 oz. to 55 oz. The 7-11 Double Gulp has 186 grams of sugar (almost a cup of sugar) and 744 calories! How does 3 hours of jogging to burn off those calories sound?  Liquid candy is what some public health officials have labeled these soft drinks.

The Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) looked at teens and high sugar drinks. CSPI’s analyses of 13- to 18-year-olds found that five percent of male soft-drink drinkers down about five or more cans a day and five percent of female drinkers consume more than three cans a day. That’s 80 percent more than 20 years ago. And, because kids are drinking more sweetened beverages than milk, they are getting too little calcium for growing teeth and bones, reports the CSPI. That's especially important for growing girls, who are at highest risk of osteoporosis.

For kids without a weight problem, one sweetened beverage per day -- as part of a well-balanced diet -- is fine, says Sarah Krieger, RD, LD, MPH, a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. "If children are maintaining a healthy weight, eating a healthy diet, and are active, one soda is OK."

The American Beverage Association agrees. "No single food or beverage is a unique contributor to obesity," says Tracey Halliday, a spokeswoman for the association. "Obesity is a serious and complex problem that is best addressed by living a balanced lifestyle -- consuming a variety of foods and beverages in moderation and getting regular physical activity. Quite simply, all calories count, regardless of the source."

If your child has a tendency to gain weight, however, it's best to keep these beverages out of the house. "Keep it for parties, since for most young kids that's about once a week," says Krieger, who is also lead instructor for children's weight management classes at All Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg, Fla.

Also, limit other sweet drinks -- including 100% fruit juice. "Yes it's healthy, but it can have as many calories as a soda. One serving a day is OK, but that's all," she says.

There have been a lot of articles on teens and obesity. Some say too many. But the reason there is so much attention paid to obesity and children is not because of how children look- but because of the damage obesity can cause to a young person’s health. One third of all kids between the ages of 2 (yes 2) and 19 are overweight or obese.  Young kids and teens are developing health problems that used to affect only adults, like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and Type2 diabetes.

Helping your child or teen wean themselves off high-sugar drinks is a good start to improving their diet and health.

In 2012, the Food and Drug Administration is expected to require chain restaurants and retail food establishments - companies whose primary business is selling food - with 20 or more locations to post calorie counts on their menus. The rule would also require calorie counts on vending machines. The calorie information would have to be "displayed clearly and prominently" and be listed per item or per serving,

The goal is to help people realize how many calories they are consuming so they can make better food and drink choices. It’s a good start towards a healthier lifestyle.

Sources:

http://thechart.blogs.cnn.com/2011/12/15/teenagers-buy-fewer-sugary-drin...

http:// children.webmd.com/features/children-and-sweetened-drinks-whats-a-parent-to-do

Daily Dose

Say No to Tanning Beds!

1.30 to read

I have previously discussed the importance of sunscreen but it is equally important to discuss the risk of artificial tanning and the use of tanning beds. I have emphasized that it is never too young to start using sunscreen, but for some reason teens think that tanning beds are a safe way to tan rather than going outside in the sun.

Not so.....tanning beds are using UVA radiation which can cause mutations in your DNA which can then lead to skin cancers. Dermatologists are seeing an increase in young women (who are more likely to use tanning booths) in their mid to late 20’s with  the deadliest form of skin cancer, malignant melanoma. Many of these women admit to frequent tanning during their teen age years.

Malignant melanoma is different than basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma,  the other more common forms of skin cancer. Malignant melanoma may spread rapidly to internal organs and lymph nodes, and if not detected at an early stage,  may be fatal within months to years.

Young girls need to understand the risks of using a tanning bed and should be encourage to use a spray tan or a tan towel to achieve the “glow” that they are wanting. They need to understand the risks that are proven to be associated with tanning bed use. Many teens and young adults are using tanning beds that are provided at their dorms or apartments as well.

If there is a family history of melanoma or unusual moles then the risk may be greater to develop an atypical mole. Those young adults who have tanned need to be followed by a dermatologist who can examine their body head to toe and “map” their moles and identify any unusual moles. At the same time they may be educated as to how to follow their own moles and changes they should be aware of.  Do you know that melanomas may arise anywhere on the body, not only the sun exposed area!

Recent articles have shown that tanning beds may be associated with an increase in non melanoma skin cancers as well. While these lesions may take longer to develop, teens and young adults need to be aware of this risk as well.

The state of California has become quite progressive in advocating for the safety of children and their skin.  California recently passed a law that children under the age of 18 may no longer use tanning beds. Other states are looking at similar legislation. Makes sense to me!

So....... no suntanning and no tanning beds. Rub, wipe or spray on your tan or enjoy beautiful fair skin. Not only is it safer, you don’t have to worry about wrinkles later in life (trust me on this issue!)

That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

HPV Vaccine & Teens

1.15 to read

Summertime in the pediatrician's office means lots of check ups, and often this includes those tweens/teens/and college students who were “too busy” to schedule their doctor’s appointments during the school year.  The next three months will be busy indeed.

With HPV back in the news after Michael Douglas revealed that his throat cancer was due to HPV, what better time to remind parents and young adults of the need for the HPV vaccine.  The HPV vaccine has been available in the U.S. for over seven years, but statistics from the CDC continue to show that the HPV vaccine is still not being given at the same rate as other recommended vaccines. In other words, we doctors need to ensure that every person between the ages of 11-26 who we see is offered the vaccine, this also means we need to educate.

HPV causes CANCER!   This is truly the first anti-cancer vaccine, and I am hopeful that I will see more vaccines to prevent cancer while I continue to practice. I am sure that there will be more anti-cancer vaccines in our children’s lifetime.  This is exciting news as research continues on ways to combat cancer.

But.....for some reason (that is difficult for me to understand both as a parent and a physician), some parents are refusing to have their children vaccinated despite ongoing evidence that HPV is widely prevalent and causes numerous cancers.  The fact that this virus is transmitted sexually seems to be the root cause of parental concern.  Do parents not assume that their own children will become parents one day as well?  Don’t they want to be grandparents one day?  Well, that means having sex with a partner.  At some point in time, our children do become “sexually active” and shouldn’t they all be protected as much as possible?

Giving adolescents the HPV vaccine does not promote sexual activity. In fact, I think that by having a discussion about sexually transmitted diseases in an open and frank manner adolescents are more aware of the risks associated with pre-marital sex and multiple partners.

My adult sons gave me a huge compliment the other day when HPV was back in the news - they said “Mom, remember when you gave us that vaccine “off label”?  We thought you were crazy but you were really smart!” I will take any praise I can get....I just smiled. 

Daily Dose

Teens, Sun and Acne

Teens using acne medication need to take extra care of their skin during the sunny months.With the sun beating down on many us, this seems like the beginning of  a long, hot summer. I am already seeing kids with sunburned shoulders and noses, and this brings to mind all of my teenage patients who are using products, both OTC and prescription, for treatment of their acne.

Although I discuss sun protection with teens throughout the year, summer is an especially important time to re-iterate the risk of sunburn and sun damage, especially for those who are using acne products. While I was growing up (many moons ago), we all thought that baking our faces in the sun helped with pimples and acne. In fact, you may see some improvement in a teens “pimply” skin after they have been in the sun, but at what cost? According to the American Academy of Dermatology, 80% of lifetime sun exposure occurs before the age of 18.  Blistering sunburns before the age of twelve (think about those peeling noses) and freckles before age 12 are both signs that too much sun exposure has happened. Many teens use over the counter products containing glycolics, lactic acids and salicylic acid products.  These products promote exfoliation (peeling) of the skin which results in more sun sensitivity. Teens are also often prescribed a group of drugs called retinoids that are applied topically to control acne.  The most common names are Retin-A, Differin (a retinoid analog), Tretinoin (generic), Renova, Tazorac, and combination products like Ziana, and Epiduo. These products cause exfoliation of the top layer of the skin which initially causes increased sun sensitivity, but after about the first 30 days of using these products you actually get thickening of the skin and therefore will have minimal to no increase in sun sensitivity as long as you are not getting red, dry or irritated from these products. I typically do not begin a teen on a retinoid product during the summer months if they are planning significant sun exposure. Procedures such as micro-dermabrasion and peels will also cause increased sensitivity early on. Due to the above statements it  is important that teens using topical ( as well as oral) acne products apply a daily facial sunscreen.   Products such as Oil of Olay Complete 15 or Complete Defense 30, or Neutrogena Dry Touch #30 are both inexpensive and well tolerated. When buying a facial sunscreen you want to make sure that the product says “non-comedogenic, non-greasy, non-irritating and broad-spectrum (UVA/UVB) coverage. For sun exposure at the pool/beach/sporting activities etc. I would use a higher sunscreen product like Neutrogena Dry Touch 55. You want to apply these to the face 30 minutes prior to sun exposure.  Make sure that you are using more than enough sunscreen on the face, squirt out enough that it looks like you have too much and just keep rubbing it on until it disappears. We are all guilty of applying too little sunscreen when using these products. Rule of thumb is a shot glass full of sunscreen can cover the whole body, but also needs to be reapplied every 2 hours. Lastly, hats and sun protective clothing definitely have a place in preventing sun damage to teens faces. These are especially useful for teens who may be lifeguarding, working on outdoor projects, or spending long hours with continuous sun exposure. Do not allow your teens to tan in a tanning booth either as this is even WORSE than tanning outdoors. If you do get a facial sunburn try mixing 1 part vinegar to 4-6 parts water to make a solution. Chill the solution and use a well soaked washcloth to apply to affected areas. Ibuprofen is also more effective for pain relief and inflammation than acetaminophen. Frequent moisturization as well as the use of a OTC topical steroid cream may also ease the symptoms, but the skin damage has already been done. With good sun protection, and a little planning a head, most teens can continue to use their acne treatment products. That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue now!

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Your Teen

FDA Proposes Ban on Tanning Beds for Minors

1:30

When warm summer days give way to cold gray skies, tanning beds can become the go-to alternative for a continuous tan. A 2014 study found that 59% of college students and 17% of teens use indoor tanning beds and a 2011 study reported that 32% of 12th graders had used a tanning bed.

Researchers have also found that people who use tanning devices before age 20 were twice as likely to develop a form of skin cancer called basal cell carcinoma by age 50, than those who had never used a tanning bed. Tanning beds are known to contribute to other skin cancers as well, including melanoma, the deadliest form of the disease.

Several studies from Europe have suggested that the radiation from a tanning bed can be up to 15 times more intense than the radiation from the midday sun.

After years of studies, the U.S. Food And Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing a ban on tanning beds for people under the age of 18, along with new preventive measures that reduce the risks from tanning to adults.

Using tanning beds at a young age can be particularly harmful, according to a statement from the FDA. The effects of UV radiation exposure add up over a lifetime, so exposure in children and teenagers puts them at greater risk for skin and eye damage later in life, according to the statement.

How many minors are using tanning beds? According to a 2013 National Youth Risk Behavior Study, about 1.6 million adolescents.

The "action is intended to help protect young people from a known and preventable cause of skin cancer and other harms," Dr. Stephen Ostroff, the acting FDA commissioner, said in the statement.

The American Academy of Pediatrics responded to the FDA's proposal with a statement of support.

"The FDA's action today is part of ensuring a safe environment for every child and adolescent, and sends a loud and clear message: Tanning beds are dangerous and should not be used by anyone under age 18," said the academy. "Pediatricians welcome FDA's action and will continue to urge parents and our young patients to protect their skin from ultraviolet radiation and to avoid tanning beds altogether."

In addition to restricting minors, the FDA is proposing that before a person's first tanning bed session and every six months thereafter, they sign a "risk acknowledge certification" that states they have been informed of the health risks that may result from indoor tanning. The hope is that people will think twice about using a tanning bed of they are reminded and have to sign off on the health dangers.

The FDA is also proposing a second rule that would require sunlamp manufacturers and tanning facilities take extra steps to improve the overall safety of the devices. Some of the proposed measures would include making warnings more prominent on the devices, requiring an emergency off switch or "panic button" and improving eye safety equipment, according to the statement.

"The FDA understands that some adults may continue to use [tanning beds]," Ostroff said in the statement. "These proposed rules are meant to help adults make their decisions based on truthful information," he said.

The new proposed rules are available for public comment for 90 days. The rules were recommended on December 21, 2015.  To comment you can log onto http://www.fda.gov/forconsumers/consumerupdates/ucm350790.htm#Proposed

Source: Sara G. Miller, http://www.livescience.com/53159-fda-proposes-tanning-bed-restrictions.html

 

 

 

 

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