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Daily Dose

Summer Skin Infections

1:30 to read

I have been seeing a lot of skin infections and many of these are due to community acquired methicillin resistant staph areus (caMRSA). The typical patient may be a teen involved in sports, but I also see this infection in young children in day care, or summer camp. The typical history is “I think I have a spider bite” and that makes your ears perk up because that is one of the most common complaints with a staph infection, which is typically not due to a bite at all.

The poor spider keeps getting blamed, and how many spiders have you seen lurking around your house waiting to pounce? The caMRSA bacteria is ubiquitous and penetrates small micro abrasions in the skin without any of us every knowing it. The typical caMRSA infection presents with a boil or pustule that grows rapidly and is very tender, red and warm to the touch. The patient will often say that they “thought it was a bite” but the lesion gets angry and red and tender very quickly and typically has a pustular center.

For most of us pediatricians, you can see a lesion and you know that it is staph. It is most common to see these lesions in athletes on exposed skin surfaces such as arms and legs, but lesions are also common on the buttocks of children who are in diapers in day care. The area is angry looking and tender and the teenage boy I saw the other day would not sit on the chair, but laid on the table on his side as he was so uncomfortable. If the lesion is pustular the doctor should obtain a culture to determine which bacteria is causing the infection, but in most cases in my office the culture of these lesions comes back as caMRSA or in the jargon Mersa. When I say Mersa, I often cause widespread panic among my patients, but in most cases to date these infections may still be treated with an oral antibiotic that covers caMRSA, such as clindamycin or trimethoprim-sulfa. Many of the lesions improve dramatically once the site is drained and cultured. I will reiterate that if possible you want your doctor to obtain a culture to identify the bacteria that is causing the infection.

To prevent caMRSA remind your student athlete not to share towels, clothing or other items. Make sure that common areas are disinfected and once again encourage good hand washing. The closure of schools or disinfecting an entire football field or area with turf is not recommended. Lastly, this is a good reminder that you only want to take an antibiotic for a bacterial infection and that overuse of antibiotics leads to resistance. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

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Daily Dose

Hot Car Deaths

1:30 to read

Did you know that heat stroke is the second leading cause of non-traffic fatalities among children, with the first being backover deaths.  As the summer temperatures are rising these tragic accidents become all too frequent.  

My home state of Texas leads the country in child vehicular heat stroke deaths, followed by Florida and California.  But children who are trapped in vehicles have died in milder climates as well. The temperatures outside may be as low as 60 degrees, but the inside of a car heats up quickly, with 80% of the increase in temperature happening in the first 10 minutes. The reason for this is due to physics.....the sun’s short-wave radiation is absorbed by dark dashboards and seats...the heated objects including child seats then emit long wave radiation which heats a vehicle’s interior air.  All of this leads to tragedy.

A child’s thermoregulatory system is not the same as an adult’s, and their body temperatures will warm 3-5 times faster.  When a child’s body temperature rises to about 107 degrees or greater, their internal organs begin to shut down.This scenario can then lead to death. If you see a child who has been left in a hot car call 911...every minute matters.

The greatest percentage of these tragic deaths are totally unintentional.  These parents are not “bad parents” or “child abusers”, they are loving, good parents who simply forgot that their child was in the car. On average there have been around 37 deaths per year due to vehicular heat stroke and in most cases this is not due to reckless behavior but simply to forgetfulness.  Parents and caregivers both admit to “just forgetting” a child was in the car.  It truly can happen to anyone.

So, how can you remember that your precious, quiet, sleeping child is in back seat. Make it a routine to always look in the back seat before you lock and leave the car.  Try putting your purse, briefcase, or cell phone in the back seat as a reminder to look for your child.

Lastly, if your child is in childcare, have a plan that the childcare provider will call you if you have not notified them that your child will not be coming to school,  and they don’t show up.

Daily Dose

Plants That Cause Summer Rashes

1:15 to read

Now that summer is upon us and everyone is enjoying being outside I am seeing patients with contact dermatitis (rashes) after coming into contact with poisonous plants.  While allergies are slowing down a bit with the hotter weather, plants like poison ivy, oak and sumac (depending where you live) are full of leaves.  About 50% of people who come into contact with the leaves of these plants will have a reaction.

The adage “leaves of three, let them be” continues to be the best way to prevent getting a rash. That also means wearing long sleeves, and pants...and gloves. But what child goes off to play in the yard, or by the creek dressed like that for summer?  Sunscreen yes, gloves, probably not. 

If you realize you have been exposed to the plant leaves and therefore the urushiol (oil on leaf) , wash all areas of exposed skin as soon as possible with some products that are available like Tecru, Sanfel and Goop Hand Cleaner....if you don’t have those use dish washing soap.  

It may take up to 4 days after exposure to develop the rash and lesions may also appear at different times depending on the location and length of exposure to the urushiol.  The rash is usually really itchy and is often is linear clusters or little vesicles or blisters.  The rash does not spread by scratching or from the fluid inside the blisters, that is a myth. You cannot give anyone else poison ivy if you have washed off the urushiol.  

The best treatments relieve the itching and irritation.  Keeps nails short and hands clean so that scratching will not cause a secondary bacterial infection.  You can use oatmeal baths (Aveeno) or cool compresses (Dommeboro) to help control itching. An over the counter steroid cream is a good place to start to help the inflammation, but it may be a stronger prescription steroid cream will be needed. 

I also try calamine lotion or astringent to soothe the irritation. Sarna is another good lotion for itching....Oral antihistamines like diphenhydramine (Benadryl) really don’t help with the itching as it is not due to histamines, but may cause a bit of sedation so a child can sleep.

If the rash is getting worse, spreading to the face and around the eyes or begins to look infected it is time for a visit to the pediatrician. For severe cases oral steroids may be necessary.

It sometimes takes 10-14 days for the rash to go away.  Oh, and getting overheated only makes you itch more.

Daily Dose

Dry Drowning

1:30 to read

It seems that at least once a week this summer I have seen a child in my office with a concern of “dry drowning”. In each case the child (anywhere from 2-6 years old) has been swimming and has had not had any issues…just a fun day in the pool.  But, the following day they “seemed tired, and didn’t want to play”, but were content to watch cartoons or play video games. A few of the children I have seen were sitting on my exam table eating a lollipop and playing on their mother’s I-phones.Thankfully, none were having any difficulty with breathing!

 

So…their concerned parents have seen media reports and are worried that this “fatigue and lethargy” is the presentation of “dry drowning”. In most cases they have also searched “dry drowning” on the internet and the first thing they see is WebMD’s definition of “dry drowning” which would concern most parents!  The article at the top of the Google search includes this.. “putting your child to bed after swimming and they never wake up in the morning”???  Who wouldn’t be worried….

 

But, if you ask most doctors (certainly all of the ones I know) they do not understand what “dry drowning” is, and have never seen a case like the one described by WebMD.  This small survey of mine included pediatric ER docs as well.  Actually “dry drowning” is not even mentioned in pediatric textbooks, and it is difficult to find the term in medical literature when doing a journal search. It is more likely to be found in media articles. 

 

As I understand it, the term “dry drowning” was first discussed in animal studies from years ago, in which animals died after ingesting water and experiencing laryngospasm, and it occurred 1-2 minutes after the immersion in water. None of the articles discussed “dry drowning” in children….but articles did discuss drownings!

 

In a pediatric study looking at data from over 15 years and “immersion related deaths- drownings” it was found that most drownings occurred at home and over 90% were due to lack of supervision.  There were no deaths reported from “dry drowning”. 

 

I am not concerned about any of my patients and “dry drowning”, but I am concerned about drowning!! 

 

Take home message….take your children to swim but be vigilant in watching them…..and you will not need to worry about any immersions or drownings!!  Drowning is preventable. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Daily Dose

How to Treat Poison Ivy

1.15 to read

With the long weekend here, many families are enjoying the outdoors. But with outdoor activity, your children may develop summer rashes like poison ivy, poison oak or poison sumac. Each plant is endemic to different areas of the country, but unfortunately all 50 states have one of these pesky plants. Teach your children the adage “leaves of three, let it be”, so they come to recognize the typical leaves of the poison ivy.

The rash of poison ivy (we will use this as the prototype) is caused by exposure of the skin to the plant sap urushiol, and the subsequent allergic reaction. Like most allergies, this reaction requires previous exposure to the plant, and upon re-exposure your child will develop an allergic contact dermatitis. This reaction may occur anywhere from hours to days after exposure, but typically occurs one to three days after the sap has come into contact with your child’s skin and they may then develop the typical linear rash with vesicles and papules that are itchy, red and swollen. Poison ivy is most common in people ages four to 30. During the spring and summer months I often see children who have a history of playing in the yard, down by a creek, exploring in the woods etc, who then develop a rash. I love the kids playing outside, but the rash of poison ivy may be extremely painful especially if it is on multiple surface areas, as in children who are in shorts and sleeveless clothes at this time of year. The typical fluid filled vesicles (blisters) of poison ivy will rupture (after scratching), ooze and will ultimately crust over and dry up, although this may take days to weeks. The fluid from the vesicles is NOT contagious and you cannot give the poison ivy to others once you have bathed and washed off the sap. You can get poison ivy from contact with your pet, toys, or your clothes etc. that came in contact with the sap, and have not have been washed off. If you know your child has come into contact with poison ivy try to bath them immediately and wash vigorously with soap and water within 5

Daily Dose

Don't Miss Out on Summer Fun!

1.00 to read

The lazy days of summer seem like the perfect time to engage in playtime activities. My summer months at the office are particularly busy doing check ups as everyone is out of school. This means that I seem to see a lot of children in the 5-12 year group, and I enjoy getting to talk to them about their summer fun. 

I have suddenly realized that many of the children in this age group seemed to have “missed” some key milestones in child development, which I think most of us adults learned during the lazy days of summer.  I think learning to ride a bicycle and learning how to swim are two MUSTS of child development. While not all children will want to one day participate in a swim team, or a bike race, being able to swim and pedal a bicycle are life long skills. Who knows, with the price of gas we may all be heading back to bicycles as preferred transportation, at least for short distances.  

At the same time I have noticed a fair number of parents who are concerned about their young children’s motor development.  This is the 2-4 year old group where I am sometimes amazed when the parent of a 3 year old tells me that their child “does not jump high enough”. What?  How about getting out the jump rope again, and drawing hopscotch on the sidewalk to practice hopping and jumping. These are free exercises that can help boost coordination while having fun together. What about learning to skip and to balance on a beam (doesn’t have to be at gymnastics) a two by four in the back yard or park works just as well. Learning to pump a swing is another. I can remember how proud I was when I mastered that skill (makes me smile, even today). 

So while the last days of summer are here, make a list of not only summer reading, or computer skills that your child needs to finish, but of some of those childhood milestones as well.  Hop, skip, jump rope, ride a bike, learn to swim. College applications might start asking about those milestones one day too?  Stranger things have happened.

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Daily Dose

Life Jackets!

1:15 to read

Summer is here and that means many of my patients are taking off to the beach or the lake to escape the heat and enjoy some water activities.  I recently saw a patient who told me that had just gotten a new boat and were looking forward to getting the kids out on the water.  This brought up the subject of life vests. 

When taking your children on a boat it is important that you have life vests for everyone. It is a law that all children under 13 years of age wear a “coast guard approved” life vest when on a boat that is being operated. This designation is very important, as many of the “life vests” that parents buy are not approved for boating…this includes “water wings” and some of the “cute” wearable t-shirts with life preservers sewn into them. 

Once you have found “coast guard approved” life jackets you might let your child help pick out the one they like the best and that is comfortable. This is important as it will ensure that they are both safe and comfortable. Children’s life jackets are sized by weight, so you might always have a few extras in case a friend or two comes along at the last minute.

Infants life jackets are are a bit different and have a strap that runs between their legs and extra flotation behind the head which guarantees that the baby floats face up at all times. I can attest to this important safety feature as my husband took our son on a little boat one summer day at a friends lake house. The lake was small enough that I could actually see them from the house as they rowed out to try to catch a fish. It was two men and a toddler on the boat…and I watched in horror as our 14 month old (now 32 year old) son leaned over the side of the boat to look at the fish and fell right into the dark murky Texas lake!!  Fortunately, we had followed the boating RULES and he was wearing his bright orange coast guard certified life jacket and bobbed right up to the surface…with a huge scared look on his face!  We have many pictures of our boys in the life jackets every time they set foot on a boat...including this one!

Lastly, get in the habit of applying sunscreen before you even set off for the dock and then have the children put on their life jackets. Kids can just as easily fall off the dock into the water as you prepare to get on the boat.  I would also encourage them to wear a hat for additional sun protection.

A day of boating is a great family activity and there is a lot a child can learn on board as well…how to navigate with a boating chart or GPS coordinates, how to watch for buoys or other water markings and all of the boating jargon.

Bon Voyage! 

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