Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Your Child

Kids: Mouthguards For All Contact Sports

1:45

Youth sports participation has grown steadily over the years and so have injuries. The National Youth Sports Foundation for Safety reports dental injuries as the most common type of face and mouth injury kids experience in sports related accidents.

A new report issued by dental experts at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, says that mouthguards should be included in safety gear for all contact sports.  

Sports-related dental injuries send more than 600,000 people to the emergency room every year, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports.

Most of these injuries involve the front teeth, but the tongue and cheeks can also be hurt while playing sports, the UAB team said.

The best way to protect the mouth and teeth during sports is to wear a mouthguard, says Dr. Ken Tilashalski, associate dean for academic affairs at the UAB School of Dentistry. Mouthguards have been shown to reduce the risk of sports-related dental injury by 60 times, he said.

"Wearing a mouthguard reduces the chances of tooth fractures, tooth dislocations and soft tissue cuts," Tilashalski said in a university news release. "The guards also protect against jaw fractures and concussions by absorbing the energy of a traumatic blow to the chin."

The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends wearing custom mouthguards for the following sports: acrobats, basketball, boxing, field hockey, football, gymnastics, handball, ice hockey, lacrosse, martial arts, racquetball, roller hockey, rugby, shot putting, skateboarding, skiing, skydiving, soccer, squash, surfing, volleyball, water polo, weightlifting, and wrestling. Other experts include baseball and softball infielders on that list. They further recommend the mouthguard to be worn during all practices and competition.

There are basically three types of mouthguards to choose from:

·      Stock: These are preformed and ready to wear, but they may not fit well inside the mouth.

·      Boil and bite: These may be customized and molded to the mouth by softening in boiling water before biting down.

·      Custom-made: A dentist tailor-makes these mouthguards to fit an individual's mouth. These mouthguards provide the best fit and the highest level of protection.

"For my kids, I have chosen to use custom mouthguards as they fit and feel better, do not interfere with speech, and are essentially invisible," Tilashalski said. "Mouthguards need to be replaced as they wear down, and athletes in the tooth-forming years will have to have these replaced more often as the mouth grows and the teeth change."

These mouthguards vary in price and comfort, yet all provide some protection. According to the ADA, the most effective mouthguard should be comfortable, resistant to tearing, and resilient. A mouthguard should fit properly, be durable, easily cleaned, and not restrict speech or breathing.

After each use, rinse your mouthguard and store it in a hard container to prevent the buildup of germs, Tilashalski said. Players should also avoid chewing on their mouthguard to extend its life.

It is important to remember damaged teeth do not grow back. Protect your child’s teeth by making sure he or she wears a mouthguard during practice, competition or just out having fun in a sport where falls are common such as biking, skating and skateboarding.

Story sources: Mary Elizabeth Dallas, https://consumer.healthday.com/dental-and-oral-information-9/misc-dental-problem-news-174/mouthguards-key-defense-against-sports-related-injuries-716284.html

http://www.nationwidechildrens.org

Play
2091 views in 5 years
Prevent a Concussion!

Prevent a Concussion!

Your Teen

Amateur Athletes May Be at Greater Risk For CTE

1:45

Former NFL player and sportscaster, Frank Gilford, passed away in August. Not only was he well known for his on and off the field talents, but his name suddenly became associated with a terrible brain disease that is becoming all too common among former athletes, chronic traumatic encephalopathy or CTE. Gilford’s family said although he died from natural causes he also suffered from the debilitating effects of CTE which can affect thinking, memory, behavior and a person’s mood. His family decided to have his brain studied in hopes of shedding some light on the link between football and traumatic brain injury.  

A new study suggests that an increase of risk for CTE can begin much earlier in life for those who play contact sports where concussions and head trauma are common.

Researchers analyzed the brains of 66 men who had donated their organs to the Mayo Clinic Brain Bank and participated in sports such as football, rugby, wrestling, boxing and basketball while in school. Their brains were compared to the brains of 198 people, including 66 women, who never played contact sports.

CTE was found in the brains of a third of the men who played amateur contact sports. But no sign of the disease was detected in the brains of those who never played contact sports, the researchers said.

"The 32 percent of CTE we found in our brain bank is surprisingly high for the frequency of neurodegenerative pathology within the general population," wrote study author Kevin Bieniek, a pre-doctoral student in Mayo Graduate School's Neurobiology of Disease program.

"If one in three individuals who participate in a contact sport goes on to develop CTE pathology, this could present a real challenge down the road," Bieniek said.

Dr. Dennis Dickson, senior study author and neuropathologist at Mayo Clinic, noted that this study is the first to use newly developed government criteria to diagnose CTE in nonprofessional athletes.

"The frequency with which he [Bieniek] found CTE pathology in former [amateur] athletes exposed to contact sports was surprising," Dickson said. "It is pathology that had gone previously unrecognized."

Some individuals may be at an even greater risk of developing CTE if they have a genetic marker. Researchers have found two genetic markers that may affect the possibility of developing CTE.

"These markers need to be further studied in a larger group of CTE cases, but they could be very important in determining whether an individual is at greater risk of developing these brain changes," Bieniek said.

"The purpose of our study is not to discourage children and adults from participating in sports because we believe the mental and physical health benefits are great," he noted.

"It is vital that people use caution when it comes to protecting the head. Through CTE awareness, greater emphasis will be placed on making contact sports safer, with better protective equipment and fewer head-to-head contacts," Bieniek concluded.

The study was published in the December issue of journal Acta Neuropathologica.

Source: Robert Preidt, http://consumer.healthday.com/cognitive-health-information-26/concussions-news-733/playing-contact-sports-in-youth-may-raise-risk-for-degenerative-brain-disease-705847.html

Daily Dose

Sports Drinks or Water?

Does your child need a sports drink or water to hydrate? A new study reveals the best practices for your kids. The AAP Committee on Nutrition and the Council on Sports Medicine and Fitness just released a report outlining the use and misuse of sports drinks and energy drinks among children and adolescents.

While pediatricians have been effective in discouraging families from drinking full calorie carbonated beverages, and schools have phased out full-calorie soft drinks in cafeterias and vending machines, there has been huge growth in the sports and energy drinks market. It seems that these sports drinks are now the third fastest growing beverage category in the US, after energy drinks and bottled water. Many of these beverages are being marketed towards children and teens for a big variety of inappropriate uses. To begin with, sports drinks and energy drinks are really very different products. Sports drinks are flavored beverages that contain carbohydrates, along with minerals, electrolytes, and they should be used specifically for hydration in athletes. Advertisements would suggest that these products may optimize athletic performance and replace fluid and electrolytes lost in sweat during exercise. For the average child who is engaged in routine physical activity, the use of sports drink is really unnecessary, good old water will do the trick. It is important to teach children to hydrate with plenty of water before, during and after regular exercise. If doctors and parents are encouraging exercise as a means of improving overall health and wellness, providing sugary sports drinks seems counter intuitive. Some kids may not even burn as many calories with their exercise as they may receive from one bottle of a sports drink. In other words a child’s overall daily caloric intake may increase without any real nutritional value provided by a sports drink. Back to reading labels! For athletes who are participating in vigorous exercise, or in conditions of prolonged physical activity, blood glucose is an important energy source and may need to be replenished; in which case sports drink providing additional carbohydrate may be appropriate. But, different sports drinks contain differing amounts of carbs, anywhere from 2-19 grams of carbohydrate per 8 oz serving. The caloric content of sports drinks is 10 – 70 calories per serving.  You must look at the labels and judge the intensity and duration of exercise to decide which drink to use. With summer approaching, it is good to know that sports drinks really are not indicated for use during meals or snacks, and are not a replacement for low fat milk or water. Turn on the faucet and cut down on calories and cavities! That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow. How do your kids stay hydrated? Let me know!

Daily Dose

Busy Sports Schedules

1:30 to read

I can’t get over how many of my young patients who play sports tell me that they are up late at night during the school week due to their soccer schedule, or who miss church on Sunday due to a soccer or baseball game. Not only are kids starting organized sports at younger and younger ages (soccer for 3 year olds, flag football at 5?), the commitment to practice or play at what I would term “inappropriate” times seems to be more prevalent and absurd to me.

The mother of a 10 year old boy called me recently to discuss how upset and tearful her son had been since school has started.  Upon further questioning it seems that he had joined a fall baseball team and some of their games are scheduled on school nights at 8 pm....which means they don’t even get home until 10:30 or 11:00 pm?  When my own sons were playing high school sports I was not thrilled about Thursday evening JV games and how late we got home....but elementary school?  Of course, her son was exhausted and then he would get anxious about getting his homework done before hand and getting to bed so late and then being able to get up in the morning etc. etc.  She said that he now wanted to “quit playing baseball”, and cried every time he had to practice.

She was trying to explain to him that he had made a commitment to his team and needed to finish out the season, which I agree is an important life lesson about following through.  At the same I totally understand how upset he is that he has to stay up past his usual school night bedtime. It is not uncommon for some children to get very tearful when they are just exhausted...same for adults.

So how do you rationalize teaching your child about loyalty to their team and commitment when adults make up crazy schedules requiring young kids to stay up past an appropriate bedtime, or forgoing Sunday school if that is what they typically do on Sunday morning rather than going to a scheduled soccer game?

Hard for me to figure out how to “fix” this situation until enough parents say..”we will not let our children participate on the team unless the schedule is appropriate for their age”.  

Have you had any similar experiences? What do you think?

 

Daily Dose

Sledding Accidents

Over 20,000 children were seen in the emergency room for sledding accidents. how to keep your kids safe while still having fun.With another major snowstorm hitting most of the East Coast and blanketing the south in ice, it seems like there will be several more “snow days” with children (and their parents) home from school.

I have such fond memories of growing up in Washington, D.C. and the idyllic “snow days” spent outside with our Radio Flyer sleds.  My brother and I would head out the door for the big hill right outside of our house which would become a mecca for the sledders. The street was fairly steep and for that reason was often closed (guess they didn’t make 4 wheel drive vehicles then?), and the hill was perfect for a fast ride that was probably ¼ mile long. The ride down was glorious, the trek back up seemed VERY long.  Those were the days!  We could spend hours out there, only coming in long enough to change out of wet gloves, grab a hot chocolate, and back out we went. I must say, most of the time there was very little adult supervision, and thankfully there were no “major” injuries that I recall. With those memories in mind I decided to do a little research on sledding safety and accidents. An article in the September 2010 issue of Pediatrics reviewed sled related injuries.   Did you realize that there were over 230,000 sledding injuries reported over a 10 year retrospective period, in other words more than 20,000/year and those were only those that were seen in emergency rooms. There were probably many more that went unreported as the child was seen in an urgent care, or private practice rather than ER. Children 10 – 14 years of age were in involved in 42.5% of sledding related injuries and boys represented about 60% of all cases.  WOW! Sleds can reach speeds of up to 20-25 mph and head trauma is one of the biggest concerns.  It is reported that the head was the most commonly injured body part (I feel lucky that I survived those sled races) and that injuries to the head were twice as likely to following a collision. Children 4 years of age and younger were 4 times more likely to sustain a head injury. Other injuries reported from sled related accidents included fractures, contusions and abrasions.  In this study about 4% of cases required hospitalization and of this number nearly half were due to fractures while about ¼ were due to traumatic brain injuries. The injuries were more common when toboggans, snow tubes or discs were used than with traditional sleds that have a steering mechanism. Another interesting finding was that many of the injuries occurred due to the fact that the sled was being pulled by a motorized vehicle which resulted in more collisions. As you well know, the advent of helmets has really helped to prevent injuries from biking, and helmets are now recommended for sledding, skiing and snowboarding.    A report from the consumer product safety commission showed a 58% reduction in head injuries among children less than 15 years of age after helmets were used for skiing and snowboarding. As more and more people wear helmets for these activities one would hope to see a decrease in injuries reported from sledding. To ensure safety while sledding make sure that there is parental/adult supervision at all times. Sledding on streets should be discouraged and never sled where a hill meets a pond which may not yet be frozen. Sledding slopes should be free of tress and other obstacles that might cause collisions.  Children should sit up and face forward and never sled head first. Sleds should never be pulled by a motorized vehicle, which includes a snow mobile.  Sleds with the potential to rotate like discs (I guess that is the flying saucer of old) and snow tubes may carry significant risks, and should be discouraged. With 49 of 50 states currently reporting have snow “somewhere” on the ground make the winter sledding safety a priority and go buy a helmet and have fun. That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comments to me. I would love to hear from you.

Daily Dose

Athletes & Injuries

1.30 to read

I see a lot of athletic teens, and while many of them participate in several sports more and more tweens and teens are “specializing” in one sport. In other words, they may only play soccer or basketball, or be a gymnast or a dancer.  In some cases they practice or compete almost 365 days a year. (I think they often are only off on the 6 holidays/year that our office is closed!).  They too work really hard.

I have recently had more than a handful of elite athletes, especially girls who are gymnasts, cheerleaders and dancers, who have come to me complaining of back pain.  In most cases lower back pain is musculoskeletal in nature and will resolve with some anti-inflammatories (like ibuprofen), alternating ice and heat to the back and a few days of rest. But in some cases the back pain worsens, especially with activity and further work up is required.

In several cases the ongoing back pain is due to a spondylolysis, which is a fracture of the pars interarticularis of the vertebrae. It is akin to a stress fracture in other areas.  It is most commonly found in the pediatric population and is thought to be due to mechanical stress of the trunk with repetitive flexion, hyperextension and trunk rotation.  All of those maneuvers are the “usual” for a cheerleader doing back flips or a gymnast doing exercises with hyperextension.  Athletes who are into weight lifting (seems they all do this now) and even children who carry heavy backpacks may be at risk for a “spondy”.

The spondylolysis may show up on a plain X-ray of the back or may require a CT scan to see the fracture.  

In our community there is some difference of opinion on how best to treat the condition.  Unfortunately, it seems that the best treatment is rest which may be for weeks-months.  This is NOT what they competitive gymnast or star football player wants to hear.  

Once the pain has resolved a structured physical therapy program seems to be of benefit as well.  If conservative management for over a year does not help some orthopedists would recommend surgery. Again, there are several different views as to the benefits of surgery in this age group.

But if your child has persistent lower back pain that worsens with activity and hyperextension you should think about this condition and talk to your doctor. It is becoming more prevalent as our kids compete at higher and higher levels.  

Daily Dose

Sledding Accidents

Over 20,000 children were seen in the emergency room for sledding accidents. how to keep your kids safe while still having fun.With another major snowstorm hitting most of the East Coast and blanketing the south in ice, it seems like there will be several more “snow days” with children (and their parents) home from school.

I have such fond memories of growing up in Washington, D.C. and the idyllic “snow days” spent outside with our Radio Flyer sleds.  My brother and I would head out the door for the big hill right outside of our house which would become a mecca for the sledders. The street was fairly steep and for that reason was often closed (guess they didn’t make 4 wheel drive vehicles then?), and the hill was perfect for a fast ride that was probably ¼ mile long. The ride down was glorious, the trek back up seemed VERY long.  Those were the days!  We could spend hours out there, only coming in long enough to change out of wet gloves, grab a hot chocolate, and back out we went. I must say, most of the time there was very little adult supervision, and thankfully there were no “major” injuries that I recall. With those memories in mind I decided to do a little research on sledding safety and accidents. An article in the September 2010 issue of Pediatrics reviewed sled related injuries.   Did you realize that there were over 230,000 sledding injuries reported over a 10 year retrospective period, in other words more than 20,000/year and those were only those that were seen in emergency rooms. There were probably many more that went unreported as the child was seen in an urgent care, or private practice rather than ER. Children 10 – 14 years of age were in involved in 42.5% of sledding related injuries and boys represented about 60% of all cases.  WOW! Sleds can reach speeds of up to 20-25 mph and head trauma is one of the biggest concerns.  It is reported that the head was the most commonly injured body part (I feel lucky that I survived those sled races) and that injuries to the head were twice as likely to following a collision. Children 4 years of age and younger were 4 times more likely to sustain a head injury. Other injuries reported from sled related accidents included fractures, contusions and abrasions.  In this study about 4% of cases required hospitalization and of this number nearly half were due to fractures while about ¼ were due to traumatic brain injuries. The injuries were more common when toboggans, snow tubes or discs were used than with traditional sleds that have a steering mechanism. Another interesting finding was that many of the injuries occurred due to the fact that the sled was being pulled by a motorized vehicle which resulted in more collisions. As you well know, the advent of helmets has really helped to prevent injuries from biking, and helmets are now recommended for sledding, skiing and snowboarding.    A report from the consumer product safety commission showed a 58% reduction in head injuries among children less than 15 years of age after helmets were used for skiing and snowboarding. As more and more people wear helmets for these activities one would hope to see a decrease in injuries reported from sledding. To ensure safety while sledding make sure that there is parental/adult supervision at all times. Sledding on streets should be discouraged and never sled where a hill meets a pond which may not yet be frozen. Sledding slopes should be free of tress and other obstacles that might cause collisions.  Children should sit up and face forward and never sled head first. Sleds should never be pulled by a motorized vehicle, which includes a snow mobile.  Sleds with the potential to rotate like discs (I guess that is the flying saucer of old) and snow tubes may carry significant risks, and should be discouraged. With 49 of 50 states currently reporting have snow “somewhere” on the ground make the winter sledding safety a priority and go buy a helmet and have fun. That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comments to me. I would love to hear from you.

Daily Dose

Concussion Update

1.30

Football has started and cheerleaders are back flipping and flopping and unfortunately that means concussion “season” is beginning as well.  Concussions are also seen during soccer which has geared up for select teams, fall lacrosse, and many other contact sports.  

There is more and more data being published about concussions in children and adolescents, and most of the studies are showing that concussions are serious brain injuries and therefore needed to be treated appropriately.

A new study out of Boston Children’s Hospital showed that children and teens take longer to recover from a concussion if they have had one before.  For the study, a concussion was defined to include any altered mental status within 4 hours of the injury, and headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness and or balance problems, fatigue,drowsiness, blurred vision, memory difficulty or trouble concentrating.  The most common symptoms noted were headache, fatigue, and dizziness. Of note, 20% of the kids in the study had neuroimaging, and all were negative. 

While 5-7 years ago it was previously thought that kids recovered from a concussion within a week, we now know that recovery time for preteens and teens is longer than previously expected.   Other risk factors for a prolonged recovery were being 13 years of age or older, not losing consciousness, and having a higher “post concussion symptom questionnaire score (RPSQ).  

So, what does this all mean? It means both doctors and parents need to be very conservative in making sure that any athlete who has sustained a concussion has both physical and cognitive rest.  In the study only 92% of people who had sustained a concussion were told to refrain from athletics. That number needs to be 100%.

There will be more and more studies on the way looking at whether there is a gap between when kids “feel better” and when they are truly physiologically recovered. Once again, this study verifies that a recurrent concussion is even more serious.

If ever in doubt that your child might have sustained what used to be called a “mild concussion”, be conservative and keep them out of play. That is never the wrong call.

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

Fast relief for your kids during cold and cough season.

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.