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Daily Dose

Back to Sleep Ads

1:30 to read

I am concerned that I have been seeing on line ads promoting “new” baby products in which an infant is shown sleeping on their tummy. In other words….not following AAP guidelines that all infants are placed on their back to fall asleep.  Their should be a “law” that you cannot shoot a picture for any product being advertised for an infant in which the baby is shown sleeping in the prone position. Seeing this photo may only confuse parents about correct sleep position for their baby, especially when many of the advertisements are for sleep related products. 

 

The “back to sleep” campaign which started in 1994 has served to reduce the incidence of SIDS by over 50%. I have been fortunate in that I have not had a patient of mine die from SIDS since the recommendations for sleep position were changed. Unfortunately, when looking at data, 30% of SIDS cases report that the baby was found in the prone (tummy) position.  

 

So, if a sleep deprived new parent is surfing the net for products related to infant sleep, and then sees a baby on their tummy, they may think “maybe that is the trick “ to get my baby to sleep, never realizing the huge risk they are taking. Many a parent has come in to my office and said “ I think my baby sleeps better on their tummy”, which immediately puts a look of horror on my face!! “WHAT…I thought we had discussed that your baby must sleep on their back until they are rolling over on their own.” Some of the parents do reply, “my ……told me it was okay.” In this case do not listen to anyone about tummy sleeping!!! Discuss car seats, high chairs, pacifier options or whatever else instead….and choose which works for you. Sleep position is non negotiable. 

 

With that being said, I realize that between 4 - 7 months many babies will roll over during sleep even when placed on their backs. It is a developmental milestone for babies to roll and you cannot put a brick on them. I would “guesstimate” that about 25% of the babies I see will ultimately prefer to sleep on their tummies, but they are all out of their swaddle and then roll over after being put down on their back. I also get many videos showing me a baby in their crib who is in the act of rolling over, with a nervous parent running in turning them back over, only to have the child roll right back to their tummy. You could spend the entire night “flipping the baby” over!

 

Remember, back sleeping only, in a crib with just baby and no bumpers or toys….you will have plenty of time for other stuff in the crib when they are bigger.

Daily Dose

Kids Who Snore

1.30 to read

Does your child snore?  If so, have you discussed their snoring with your pediatrician.  A recent study published in Pediatrics supported the routine screening and tracking of snoring among preschoolers.  Pediatricians should routinely be inquiring about your child’s sleep habits, as well as any snoring that occurs on a regular basis, during your child’s routine visits.  

Snoring may be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea and/or sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and habitual snoring has been associated with both learning and behavioral problems in older children. But this study was the first to look at preschool children between the ages of 2-3 years.

The study looked at 249 children from birth until 3 years of age, and parents were asked report how often their child snored on a weekly basis at both 2 and 3 years of age.  Persistent snorers were defined as those children who snored more than 2x/week at both ages 2 and 3.  Persistent loud snoring occurred in 9% of the children who were studied.

The study then looked at behavior and as had been expected persistent snorers had significantly worse overall behavioral scores.  This was noted as hyperactivity, depression and attentional difficulties.  Motor development did not seem to be impacted by snoring.

So, intermittent snoring is  common in the 2 to 3 year old set and does not seem to be associated with any long term behavioral issues. It is quite common for a young child to snore during an upper respiratory illness as well .  But persistent snoring needs to be evaluated and may need to be treated with the removal of a child’s adenoids and tonsils.

If you are worried about snoring, talk to your doctor. More studies are being done on this subject as well, so stay tuned.

Daily Dose

Getting Your Baby to Sleep!

1:30 to read

Did you know one of the biggest Google internet searches for parents revolves around “how do I get my baby to sleep?”  I guess that any new parent in the middle of the night is online searching for “THE ANSWER”, so of course you “Google it”!

Now that we are grandparents and the baby is about 6 weeks old (although technically she is a week old, as she was 5 weeks early) my son is also looking for answers on the internet to that same question....how to make her sleep, so I can too! He even asked me if their was “magic” to this?

If only there was an answer on Google or in any book. It just takes time and every baby is different.   I guess there are some babies that sleep through the night from the time they get home from the hospital, but I have never seen one.  I think some parents just forget that at some time or another they were up at night with a newborn.

A newborn baby does not understand circadian rhythm and they are really not “trying” to keep parents up at night.  It takes weeks for a newborn to even begin to have some “routine” to their day and I try never to use the word “schedule” when discussing a newborn.  A baby is not a robot, they do not eat every 3 hours and then sleep for 3 more before eating again. They are “little people” and their tummies sometimes need to eat in 2 hours and then later it may be 3 hours before another feeding.  Don’t you sometimes eat an early lunch one day and a later lunch the next? 

But by trying to awaken the baby throughout the day and offering a feeding every 2-3 hours you will hopefully notice after several weeks that your baby is eating more often during the day and suddenly may thrill you and sleep 4 hours at night. it just takes time....YOU cannot make it happen.  I tease new parents that awakening a newborn during the day and prayer is about all you can do....all babies do eventually sleep, but it may not be right after you get them home from the hospital...think several months (as in 2-4) and you will be happy if it happens sooner.

Lastly, with all of the tech in the room, don’t pick up your baby in the middle of the night if they are just “squirming” around. Babies are notoriously loud sleepers and if they are not crying let them be and you may be surprised that they arouse and went back to sleep. If your baby cries you absolutely go get them and console them and feed them too if it is time. An infant should not be left to cry. 

This too shall pass and sleep will come, but there will be new stages down the road that will keep parents up at night, of that you can be assured. Comes with the territory.

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Back to School, Back to Sleep!

Daily Dose

New Sleep Guidelines for Your Baby

1:30 to read

I am sure that many of you heard about the latest recommendations on infant sleep that the American Academy of Pediatrics has released. The latest policy statement from the AAP recommends that all infants sleep in their parents room, but not in the parents bed,  for at least the first 6 months of life and preferably for the first year!!  This is big news and quite a change from the previous sleep recommendations which were published in 2011.

 

All of the latest recommendations regarding sleep are intended to help to reduce the incidence of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome), which is the leading cause of death for children under the age of 1 year. SIDS in one of the greatest fears of all parents. While “the back to sleep” campaign has reduced the incidence of SIDS, there are still over 3,500 babies in the U.S. who die suddenly and unexpectedly every year while sleeping. (this includes some from suffocation and strangulation and not SIDS).

 

In addition, the recommendations re-iterate that the baby should not co-sleep with their parents, but should be in a crib or bassinet with a firm sleep surface, in the parents’ room. These new recommendations, may be driven by the reality that breast feeding mothers are exhausted and often fall asleep while nursing their baby. If the mother is sitting in a chair or on the couch and falls asleep the baby may be at risk of suffocation if they roll into a cushion or fall down between pillows. If the mother is in bed breast feeding and accidentally falls asleep at least the baby is on a firm surface - make sure when you do breast feed your baby in bed to remove all loose blankets and pillows in the area around your baby prior to feeding - just in case.

 

Although it has been a long ago, I always put our infants in their own cribs to sleep -  you might say I was obsessed. One night, shortly after the birth of our 3rd child I found myself on my hands and knees looking under the bed. When my husband was awakened and asked me “what are you doing?” I replied…”looking for the baby!” He then reminded me that I had put the baby in his crib in the nursery right after I had finished breastfeeding him.  I truly had no memory and thought he had fallen under our bed!! This, from someone who had previously stayed up for 36 hours during residency working in the hospital and thought I could handle sleep deprivation- clearly not true!! I just remember the feeling of being frantic! 

 

The AAP continues to recommend that the crib be essentially bare - in other words, no bumpers, no blankets, no stuffed toys, just the fitted crib sheet. The baby should always be placed on their back to sleep…once your baby learns to roll from back to front ( which typically happens after they have learned to roll tummy to back), they may be left to sleep on their tummy. Even with a baby in your room you cannot get up all night to keep trying to keep them from rolling over!  

 

The AAP does recommend using a pacifier for sleep times ( I am a huge pacifier fan as you know). The only problem with a pacifier is convincing The Parents that it is time to “get rid of the paci” once their baby is over a year old….. sometimes hard to sell that concept.

 

Lastly, the APP reiterated that they do not support the use of any of the devices sold to new parents to help “prevent”  SIDS. In other words, all of the technology being marketed including  “anti-SIDS mattresses, home cardiorespiratory monitors, and even fancy video monitors.  While many a well intentioned parent will invest a lot of unnecessary money and time trying to make the baby safe during sleep, the mantra “less is more” is now the best way to ensure safe sleep for your baby. I remind parents that there will be plenty of ways to spend that money  - start the college savings!

 

 

 

 

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Daily Dose

Babies Rolling Around in Their Crib

Many babies roll around in their crib, but should parents worry they will spend too much time on their tummy and not be able to roll on their back?I received an email from the parents of a 3½ month old daughter who has recently learned how to roll from her back to her tummy.  Their “conundrum”, as they put it, was twofold.  They were concerned about her sleeping on her tummy, as well as the fact that she would get upset after she rolled from her back to tummy and would then “scream loudly” So,what to do?

Most babies learn to roll around 4 months of age and like everything else there is variability in this milestone.  Many babies learn to roll tummy to back first, typically while they are having tummy time. Suddenly you realize that the baby has used their arms to push up and then over onto their back.  Watching them do this is fun, as they will often look up with big startled eyes almost as saying, “Wow, this is like an amusement park ride!”, while other babies will let out a shriek and start to cry as they were scared by the whole event.  Remember we are all different and some of us (me) like roller coasters that go upside down and backwards and others (one of my children) would still rather give up a week’s allowance than get on a ride like that. There are also babies, like the one in question, who learn to roll from their back to tummy first.  This often occurs at night and causes a lot of concern, as all parents hear from the beginning, put your baby “back to sleep”.  But, even when sleep positioners were being used (they are no longer recommended), many an infant would figure out how to roll from their back to get all cozy and sleep on their tummy. Once your baby has achieved this milestone on their own, you cannot keep them from becoming a tummy sleeper. It is important that you still put the baby to bed on their back, but after that your baby will begin to find their own sleep position which many times is at the opposite end of the crib and may be on their tummy. Trying to be a vigilant parent who turns the baby back over is an exercise in futility as they have a mind of their own and will just flip over again, which is not as cute at 3 am. . You do not  need a video monitor or check on your baby every 10 minutes to see if they have rolled during the night.  As an infant has learned to roll it is also assumed that they will turn their head to clear their nose and mouth and the risk of SIDS decreases. Now, in the case of the baby in the email, she loved to flip from back to tummy, but then it would make her upset and she would scream.  Every time the parents went in there and turned her over and settled her again on her back, she would flip over to her tummy again, and the screaming would re-start.  In this case, I think you have to let your baby fuss (scream loudly) for a few minutes to see if they will either roll back over or fall to sleep again. It is so hard to hear your baby so upset, but she got herself in this mess (first of many) and so it is the beginning of figuring out how to handle it. She will either cry or roll, and you can flip a coin to see which comes first. After she has cried for 5 – 10 minutes I would go back in the room, try to soothe her while she is on her tummy (remember she rolled there) and then see if she will calm down and go back to sleep.  This is going to take patience and time and some sleep deprivation (which you had hoped was past I am sure), as she learns to self-console again after rolling over.  The good news is that she has achieved an important developmental milestone with rolling over. Lastly, once your baby is rolling remember never to leave them unattended on the bed, changing table, couch etc.  I call this 4–6 month old a “floor baby” as it is best to leave them on the floor on a blanket while you run to get a diaper or answer the phone etc.  Many a baby, including my own, has rolled right off that bed to the floor, usually without sustaining any injury but causing a lot of parental worry and guilt.  That experience must be like a free fall ride at Six Flags! That's your daily dose for today. We'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

New Baby Questions!

1:30 to read

Lots of new baby questions this week in my office, so I that I thought I would cover a few of the most frequently asked by parents within days of bringing that precious newborn home from the hospital. So, here we go:

My baby has blue hands and feet…should I go to the ER?  The medical term for this is acrocyanosis.   It is not uncommon for a baby to have a bluish/purple discoloration to their hands and feet. This often occurs if the baby gets chilled or cold, whether that is after a bath or sometimes even after they are unswaddled to wake them up a bit to get them to eat.  If your baby has pink lips and tongue and seems otherwise fine this is the normal adjustment of a baby’s circulation and may last for a few weeks to months.  When parents are concerned about this and make a trip to the ER where they are discharged with the diagnosis of “worried well”.

What temperature do I need to have my thermostat set?  This question always makes me laugh a bit because some of it is truly dependent on the climate where you live. Many parents think they need to “crank up the heat” for a newborn, but actually a cooler room temperature has been shown to correlate with a reduction in sudden infant death (SIDS).  The “ideal” temperature that has been recommended is around 68 - 70 degrees, but for those of us who live in the south during the dead of summer, it is almost impossible to keep your house this cool and very expensive. At the same time, some parents are uncomfortable during the winter with the thermostat at 68 degrees…so I would recommend keeping your house comfortable and on the cooler side rather than too warm. You also do not need to bundle your baby when it is blazing hot outside, less is more if the house is hot.

What about a pacifier?  Mother’s come in and say, “I was told that I shouldn’t use a pacifier because it will cause “nipple confusion”.  While I am a huge proponent of breast feeding I think that a pacifier is also helpful for a breast feeding mother so that she does not use her own breast as a “human pacifier”. Many new moms come in to see me at the 2 week check up crying, exhausted and with bleeding nipples. They are putting their baby on the breast for hours at a time as “it seems the only way my baby is content”.  Although they were told that they could put their finger in their baby’s mouth as a way to help console their baby, that too does not provide much of a distance from the baby…even to go to the bathroom, take a shower or eat!! A baby has the reflex to suck which is termed, “non-nutritive sucking”.  This is one way that your baby will calm themselves.  So, once your baby is getting on the breast, I would buy a pacifier and “teach” your partner how to hold your baby in the position as if they were going to be fed,  but with a pacifier to suck on rather than the breast. Once situated you can try walking around, gentle bouncing or swaying while your baby is happily sucking on their pacifier. Mother gets a bit of a rest between feedings and infant is happy with a pacifier ( rather than a finger). We will discuss taking away a pacifier at another time! 

 

Daily Dose

Why Is Your Baby Not Sleeping?

1.15 to read

I recently received an email from a mother who was beginning to have new sleep problems with her 6 month old. Whenever I get questions about a 6-9 month old and new sleep issues, most parents relate the problem to either teething and or not getting enough cereal/solids before bed time. 

In fact, new sleep issues often arise around this age as your baby is beginning to think and use those frontal lobes. Many babies had been sleeping for 6-10 hours a night by now and then suddenly begin to awake and they are crying.  This must be pain from teething, right?  So in response to that, many parents start giving their baby a pain reliever, such as acetaminophen nightly, but the sleep problems do not go away and still no teeth! 

At the same time, most babies are eating solid foods beginning around 6 months, and parents were convinced that starting solids would also cure the sleeping issues.  The baby is eating cereal and  waking up in the middle of the night. What gives? 

I think the most important milestone for this age baby to ensure good sleep:  the baby must put themselves to sleep. Many of the babies who are having awakenings are being rocked to sleep, or having the pacifier put back in their mouth all night long.  They are routinely rocked every night and then put down, so when they have arousals (as we all do all night long) they want to be rocked back to sleep, they are smart now and know what they want!   Similar to wanting a back rub every time you wake up, sounds good right? 

While all of this is going on in your baby’s mind your parent mind is telling you it has to be teething pain or lack of food or something worse, and not just a new phase of baby sleep!  Suddenly habits are started, the baby is getting fed in the middle of the night again, or you are giving acetaminophen every night, and typically the arousals continue.  

Sleep is precious for both baby and parent and a baby between 6-8 months of age should be able to not only put themselves to sleep at bedtime, but self console to go back to sleep in the middle of the night. Makes sense but takes a bit of work. This usually requires letting your baby cry for awhile. I am not a propionate of letting an infant cry it out or (CIO as this cute mom emailed), but I do see the need in this age baby. They have to learn to self-console and it is easier to break a bad habit sooner than later. Some babies have more stamina too, so each baby is going to be different in how long they can CIO. 

Practice putting the baby down awake and going back into the room to let them know you are present but not active in getting them to sleep.  Lengthen the time between each visit to their room. Repetition and consistency are the key.  It takes a while but most babies will then get back into even better and longer sleep at night, and you can stop all of that acetaminophen. They get teeth forever (well, at least for 12 years) and that is usually not the reason for waking up. Ask them when they are 5 and getting molars and sleeping well! 

That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

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DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

New report says not enough babies are getting much needed tummy time!

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

New report says not enough babies are getting much needed tummy time!

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