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Daily Dose

Brown Spots on Your Baby?

1:30 to read

I was examining a 4 month old baby the other day when I noticed that she had several light brown spots on her skin. When I asked the mother how long they had been there, she noted that she had started seeing them in the last month or so, or maybe a couple even before that.  She then started to point a few out to me on both her infant’s arm, leg and on her back.

These “caramel colored” flat spots are called cafe au lait macules, (CALMs) and are relatively common. They occur in up to 3% of infants and about 25% of children.  They occur in both males and females and are more common in children of color.  While children may have a few CALMs, more than 3 CALMS are found in only 0.2 to 0.3% of children who otherwise do not have any evidence of an underlying disorder.  

Of course this mother had googled brown spots in a baby and was worried that her baby had neurofibromatosis (NF).  She started pointing out every little speckle or spot on her precious blue eyed daughter’s skin, some of which I couldn’t even see with my glasses on. I knew she was concerned and I had to quickly remember some of the findings of NF type 1.

Cafe au lait spots in NF-1 occur randomly on the body and are anywhere from 5mm to 30 mm in diameter. They are brown in color and have a smooth border, referred to as “the coast of California”. In order to make the suspected diagnosis of NF-1 a child needs to have 6 or more cafe au lait spots before puberty, and most will present by 6 -8 years of age.

For children who present for a routine exam with several CALMs ( like this infant), the recommendation is simply to follow and look for the development of more cafe au lait macules. That is a hard prescription for a parents…watch and wait, but unfortunately that is often what parenting is about.

Neurofibromatosis - 1 is an autosomal disorder which involves a mutation on chromosome 17 and may affect numerous organ systems including not only skin, but eyes, bones, blood vessels and the nervous system. Half of patients inherit the mutation while another half have no known family history.  NF-1 may also be associated with neurocognitive deficits and of course this causes a great deal of parental concern. About 40% of children with NF-1 will have a learning disability ( some minor, others more severe).

For a child who has multiple CALMs it is recommended that they be seen by an ophthalmologist and a dermatologist yearly,  as well as being followed by their pediatrician.  If criteria for NF-1 is not met by the time a child is 10 years of age,  it is less likely that they will be affected, despite having more than 6 CALMs.

The biggest issue is truly the parental anxiety of watching for more cafe au lait spots and trying to remain CALM…easier said than done for anyone who is a parent. 

Daily Dose

Birthmarks

1:15 to read

Many years ago when children asked their parents “where did I come from?” they answered “the stork brought you”.  The picture of the stork’s beak holding on to the baby’s neck and flying to drop the baby on the new parent’s doorstep was known by all….but things change and that visual is not known by my newest parents.  In fact they look at me with completely blank stares when I discuss the birthmark on the nape of their child’s neck.

But the term “stork bite” comes from that old story, and the red birthmark seen on up to 50% of babies necks is also called nevus flammeus or nevus simplex. They are flat, pink and irregularly shaped and while they occur most commonly on the nape of the neck, they are common on the forehead, eyelids and above the upper lip as well. They are due to capillaries close to the skins surface. The stork bites on the face typically fade over time while the ones on the nape of the neck may continue to be present but are obscured and typically forgotten once the baby has hair. Many people are not even aware that they themselves have one.

When I am doing a newborn exam I see so many of these little “flat red patches” that I often to forget to bring them up as they are small and typically fade….but sometimes a parent will specifically ask about them. After I apologize for not bringing it up….as I know they are small and fade, but they are concerned,  I tell them that they are “stork bites” and get that blank look.  Then I launch into the etiology for the name etc. But, things are getting ready to change as STORKS a new animated movie is just bring released.  The old myth of the stork is making a come back!

So…if your baby has this small birthmark, no need to worry.  Be assured that most will fade but if they have not resolved by the age of 3 or 4 years, there are now lasers available to treat them.

In the meantime..take your family to see "STORKS" so they are aware of where “you used to come from”!  We can still tell our children the myth of the stork and then make sure to discuss the truth about “where did I come from?”. 

 

 

 

Daily Dose

Acne Problems

Adolescents and acne….the two often go together. With so many options, both over the counter and prescription available, most teens who are interested in treating their acne can achieve clear skin.  The first step is typically making sure that the tween-teen is washing their face every morning and before bed…which proves to be difficult for some.

 

Interestingly, diet may also play a role in acne. While we were told years ago that french fries and greasy hamburgers may cause acne a new study suggests that milk may actually be the culprit and contribute to the development of acne. I can even remember the dermatologist many years ago asking my sons (who unfortunately all dealt with acne) if they were big milk drinkers.  

 

There have been earlier studies (2005 - 2008) which showed a correlation between milk intake and acne…and the risk seemed to be greater in those that drank non fat milk over whole milk.  The newest study published in 2016 looked at teens with acne compared to controls who did not have acne and found “positive associations with total dairy and non-fat dairy, but not with whole-fat or low -fat dairy. In other words it seemed that skim milk might be involved in the pathogenesis of acne??  There have been proposed mechanisms as to why this might occur, but much of it is speculative.

 

At the same time that teens are developing acne they are also growing and building healthy bones, which means more calcium is needed in their diets. Nutritional guidelines recommend 1,300 mg of calcium every day for adolescents. Much of the dietary calcium intake comes from dairy products including milk, yogurt, and cheese.  It is often very hard for adolescents to meet the daily calcium and vitamin D requirements and stopping dairy may put them at risk nutritionally.

 

But, with that being said….in cases of teenage acne that do not seem to be improving on a well prescribed skin care regimen, it may be prudent to do a dairy free trial to see if this makes a difference in their acne. During the trial you can easily offer a calcium supplement.   If the teen’s face does not seem to improve with a 2-4 week dairy free trial I would recommend to resume normal dairy intake - but maybe use whole-fat or low-fat dairy rather than non fat.

 

This would be a good topic for discussion with your own dermatologist.

Daily Dose

When Bug Bites Get Infected

1.00 to read

It is the season for bug bites and and I am seeing a lot of parents who are bringing their children in for me to look at all sorts of insect bites. I am not always sure if the bite is due to a mosquito, flea or biting flies, but some of them can cause fairly large reactions. 

The immediate reaction to an insect bite usually occurs in 10-15 minutes after bitten, with local swelling and itching and may disappear in an hour or less. A delayed reaction may appear in 12-24 hours with the development of an itchy red bump which may persist for days to weeks.  This is the reason that some people do not always remember being bitten while they were outside, but the following day may show up with bites all over their arms, legs or chest, depending on what part of the body had been exposed. 

Large local reactions to mosquito bites are very common in children. For some reason, it seems to me that “baby fat” reacts with larger reactions than those bites on older kids and adults. (no science, just anecdote). Toddlers often have itchy, red, warm swellings which occur within minutes of the bites. 

Some of these will go on to develop bruising and even spontaneous blistering 2-6 hours after being bitten. These bites may persist for days to weeks, so in theory, those little chubby legs may be affected for most of the summer. 

Severe local reactions are called “skeeter syndrome” and occur within hours of being bitten and may involve swelling of an entire body part such as the hand, face or an extremity. These are often misdiagnosed as cellulitis, but with a good history of the symptoms  (the rapidity with which the area developed redness, swelling, warmth to touch and tenderness) you can distinguish large local reactions from infection.

Systemic reactions to mosquito bites including generalized hives, swelling of the lips and mouth, nausea, vomiting and wheezing have been reported due to a true allergy to the mosquito salivary proteins, but are extremely rare. 

The treatment of local reactions to bites involves the use of topical anti-itching preparations like Calamine lotion, Sarna lotion and Dommeboro soaks.  This may be supplemented by topical steroid creams (either over the counter of prescription) to help with itching and discomfort. 

An oral antihistamine (Benadryl) may also reduce some of the swelling and itching. Do not use topical antihistamines. Try to prevent secondary infection (from scratching and picking) by using antibacterial soaps, trimming fingernails and applying an antibiotic cream (polysporin) to open bites. 

Due to an exceptionally warm winter throughout the country the mosquito population seems to be especially prolific. The best treatment is prevention!! Before going outside use a DEET preparation in children over the age of six months, and use the lowest concentration that is effective.  Mosquito netting may be used for infants in strollers.  Remember, do not reapply bug spray like you would sunscreen. 

Daily Dose

Spring Viruses

1.30 to read

While it is warming up here in Dallas, many parts of the country are still seeing freezing temperatures and even snow! Even so, I am beginning to see typical spring illnesses like Fifth’s disease. 

Fifth disease is a common viral illness seen in children, often in the late winter and spring. Many of these children look like they have gotten a little sun burn on their faces (just as your child starts playing outside) as they often show up in my office with the typical slapped cheek rash on their faces.  At the same time they may also have a lacy red rash on their arms and legs, and occasionally even their trunks.

Fifth’s is also called erythema infectiosum and is so named as it is the fifth of the six rash associated illnesses of childhood. Fifth disease is caused by Parvovirus B19, which is a virus that infects humans. It is NOT the same parvovirus that infects your pet dog or cat, so do not fear your child will not give it to their pet or vice a versa.  In most cases a child may have very few symptoms of illness, other than the rash.  In some cases a child may have had a low-grade fever, or runny nose or just a few days of not feeling well and then the rash may develop several days later. The rash may also be so insignificant as to not be noticed. When I see a child with Fifth disease it is usually an easy diagnosis based on their few symptoms and the typical rash.

Although children with Fifth are probably contagious at some time during their illness, it is thought that by the time the rash occurs the contagious period has passed. This is why you never know where you got this virus. (the incubation period is somewhere between 4-20 days after exposure).  Parvovirus B19 may be found in respiratory secretions and is probably spread by person to person contact.  During outbreaks it has been reported that somewhere between 10-60% of students in a class may become infected.

Most adults have had Fifth disease and may not even have remembered it, as up to 20% of those infected with parvovirus B19 do not develop symptoms, so it is often not a memorable event during childhood.

Fifth disease is another one of those wonderful viruses that resolves on its own. I like to refer to the treatment as “benign neglect” as there is nothing to do!  The rash may take anywhere from 7–10 days to resolve. I do tell parents that the rash may seem to come and go for a few days and seems to be exacerbated by sunlight and heat. So, it is not uncommon to see a child come in from playing on a hot sunny day and the rash is more obvious on those sun exposed areas. 

Occasionally a child will complain of itching, and you can use a soothing lotion such as Sarna or even Benadryl to relieve problematic itching. A cool shower or bath at the end of a warm spring day may work just as well too. Children who are immunocompromised, have sickle cell disease, or have leukemia or cancer may not handle the virus as well and they should be seen by their pediatrician. But in most cases there is no need to worry about Fifth disease, so it is business as usual with school, spring days at the park and Easter parties.

That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Diagnosing Eczema

After examining her cute daughter, who scratched her skin throughout our discussion, it was pretty clear that she had "nummular eczema".I saw a child in the office today whose mother was concerned that she had "ringworm gone wild". She told me that her daughter had numerous places "including several obvious ones on her face and eyelid". They seemed to be spreading, and she was using antifungal medication from another doctor. Despite this they were "overtaking her body".

The first thing I thought is this is probably NOT ringworm with so many areas involved. It is fairly uncommon to see that many areas of involvement with the "dreaded ringworm" which is a fungal infection on the skin. She also made me laugh when she said she had considered leprosy in her diagnosis, but didn't think the Google description matched. Gotta love the Internet. After examining her cute daughter, who scratched her skin throughout our discussion, it was pretty clear that she had "nummular eczema". These coin shaped dry, scaly, inflamed and itchy lesions are just another form of eczematous dry skin and are often confused with ringworm. They are usually in scattered areas chest, legs, arms, and in this case had become secondarily infected due to the persistent scratching, so they looked even nastier than usual eczema. Much relief by all that we could clear these up with several medications and not ship her off to the leper or ringworm colony. So before jumping to ringworm gone wild, consider eczema and particularly nummular (coin shaped) eczema. That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow!

Daily Dose

Monitoring Moles In Children

1.00 to read

Everybody gets moles, even people who use sunscreen routinely. Moles can occur on any area of the body from the scalp, to the face, chest, arms, legs, groin and even between fingers and toes and the bottom of the feet.

So, not all moles are related to sun exposure. Many people inherit the tendency to have moles and may have a family history of melanoma (cancer), so it is important to know your family history. People with certain skins types, especially fair skin, as well as those people who spend a great deal of time outside whether for work or pleasure may be more likely to develop dangerous moles. Children may be born with a mole (congenital) or often develop a mole in early childhood. It is common for children to continue to get moles throughout their childhood and adolescence and even into adulthood. The most important issue surrounding moles is to be observant for changes in the shape, color, or size of your mole. Look especially at moles that have irregular shapes, jagged borders, uneven color within the same mole, and redness in a mole. I begin checking children’s moles at their early check ups and look for any moles that I want parents to continue to be watching and to be aware of. I note all moles on my chart so I know each year which ones I want to pay attention to, especially moles in the scalp, on fingers and toes and in areas that are not routinely examined. A parent may even check their child’s moles every several months too and pay particular attention to any of the more unusual moles. Be aware that a malignant mole may often be flat, rather than the raised larger mole. Freckles are also common in children and are usually found on the face and nose, the chest, upper back and arms. Freckles tend to be lighter than moles, and cluster. If you are not sure ask your doctor. Sun exposure plays a role in the development of melanoma and skin cancer, so it is imperative that your child is sun smart. That includes wearing a hat and sunscreen, as well as the newer protective clothing that is available at many stores. I would also have your child avoid the midday sun and wear a hat. Early awareness of sun protection will hopefully establish good habits and continue throughout your child’s life. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

When Bug Bites Get Infected

1.00 to read

It is the season for bug bites and and I am seeing a lot of parents who are bringing their children in for me to look at all sorts of insect bites. I am not always sure if the bite is due to a mosquito, flea or biting flies, but some of them can cause fairly large reactions. 

The immediate reaction to an insect bite usually occurs in 10-15 minutes after bitten, with local swelling and itching and may disappear in an hour or less. A delayed reaction may appear in 12-24 hours with the development of an itchy red bump which may persist for days to weeks.  This is the reason that some people do not always remember being bitten while they were outside, but the following day may show up with bites all over their arms, legs or chest, depending on what part of the body had been exposed. 

Large local reactions to mosquito bites are very common in children. For some reason, it seems to me that “baby fat” reacts with larger reactions than those bites on older kids and adults. (no science, just anecdote). Toddlers often have itchy, red, warm swellings which occur within minutes of the bites. 

Some of these will go on to develop bruising and even spontaneous blistering 2-6 hours after being bitten. These bites may persist for days to weeks, so in theory, those little chubby legs may be affected for most of the summer. 

Severe local reactions are called “skeeter syndrome” and occur within hours of being bitten and may involve swelling of an entire body part such as the hand, face or an extremity. These are often misdiagnosed as cellulitis, but with a good history of the symptoms  (the rapidity with which the area developed redness, swelling, warmth to touch and tenderness) you can distinguish large local reactions from infection.

Systemic reactions to mosquito bites including generalized hives, swelling of the lips and mouth, nausea, vomiting and wheezing have been reported due to a true allergy to the mosquito salivary proteins, but are extremely rare. 

The treatment of local reactions to bites involves the use of topical anti-itching preparations like Calamine lotion, Sarna lotion and Dommeboro soaks.  This may be supplemented by topical steroid creams (either over the counter of prescription) to help with itching and discomfort. 

An oral antihistamine (Benadryl) may also reduce some of the swelling and itching. Do not use topical antihistamines. Try to prevent secondary infection (from scratching and picking) by using antibacterial soaps, trimming fingernails and applying an antibiotic cream (polysporin) to open bites. 

Due to an exceptionally warm winter throughout the country the mosquito population seems to be especially prolific. The best treatment is prevention!! Before going outside use a DEET preparation in children over the age of six months, and use the lowest concentration that is effective.  Mosquito netting may be used for infants in strollers.  Remember, do not reapply bug spray like you would sunscreen. 

Daily Dose

The Trials & Tribulations of Teen Acne

It doesn't matter if it is one zit or 100 pimples, most teens are bothered by bumps on their faces.Acne is one of the most perplexing issues for an adolescent. It doesn't matter if it is one zit or 100 pimples, most teens are bothered by bumps on their faces. The only thing they want their doctor to do is to "make my skin clear, NOW". As a 'tween enters adolescence, they may notice bumps on their forehead or nose. The first thing to combat early acne is getting the adolescent into the routine of washing their face twice a day.

Beginning with an over the counter soap or acne wash, something like Neutrogena, Purpose or Clean and Clear. There is even Neutrogena acne wash in a pump that is easy to use. If they are still having break out issues and need the next step, an over-the-counter benzoyl peroxide would be helpful. This comes in several strengths, begin low so as not to get too dry and increase strength as tolerated. Benzoyl peroxide is the medication that is "hyped" in pro-active, at the same strength, at a much less expensive price point. If washing the face and using benzoyl peroxide does not control the acne problem it may be time to see the pediatrician or dermatologist to decide if prescription strength medication is in order. The mantra for treating acne should be no picking, do to the risk of infection and scarring and patience, clearing up skin takes time, and a teen has little of that. That's your daily dose, we'll chat again soon!

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