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Daily Dose

How To Prevents SIDS

1:15 to read

A new study on swaddling and sudden infant death (SIDS) was just published this week in the journal Pediatrics. Not surprisingly, it found that infants who were swaddled and placed on their sides or stomach had a higher incidence of SIDS. It has been routinely recommended for more than 15 years that all babies sleep on their backs and since that time the incidence of SIDS has been dramatically reduced.  Unfortunately not everyone follows the AAP recommendation. 

While it has been known that tummy sleeping has been associated with SIDS this meta analysis looked at data which was gathered over two decades and from 3 different global sites. The review found that infants who were swaddled and placed on their sides were almost twice as likely to experience SIDS and the risk of SIDS did double in those babies who were swaddled and placed on their stomachs.  

I discuss swaddling with all of my patients as there are so many different swaddle blankets available.  Actually, one of the first things a newborn nurse seems to teach a new parent is how to swaddle their baby.  While swaddling has been promoted to aid in calming a newborn as well as to help their sleep, the recommendation that the baby be placed on their back in their crib continues..  Many a baby looks like a little burrito….. rolled up in the swaddle and then being placed on their back in the crib.

But is seems from this study that some babies were being swaddled and then placed on their side to sleep. Unfortunately, even a newborn may squirm enough that they then move from their side into the prone position.  Older infants who are swaddled may actually roll from their back to their tummies, even while swaddled. While the association between swaddling and SIDS remains unclear, I think this is a good reason to start getting a baby out of a swaddle once they are rolling. So around the 3 month mark I start having parents loosen the swaddle and try to just lay the baby on their back without being swaddled.

Let me re-iterate, this article does not confirm an association between swaddling and SIDS.  I do think it is a good reminder for putting a baby, “back to sleep” and once they are rolling “ditching” the swaddle seems to make even more sense. Once less thing to worry about, right?

 

Daily Dose

Prevent SIDS

1:15 to read

A new study on swaddling and sudden infant death (SIDS) was just published this week in the journal Pediatrics. Not surprisingly, it found that infants who were swaddled and placed on their sides or stomach had a higher incidence of SIDS. It has been routinely recommended for more than 15 years that all babies sleep on their backs and since that time the incidence of SIDS has been dramatically reduced.  Unfortunately not everyone follows the AAP recommendation. 

While it has been known that tummy sleeping has been associated with SIDS this meta analysis looked at data which was gathered over two decades and from 3 different global sites. The review found that infants who were swaddled and placed on their sides were almost twice as likely to experience SIDS and the risk of SIDS did double in those babies who were swaddled and placed on their stomachs.  

I discuss swaddling with all of my patients as there are so many different swaddle blankets available.  Actually, one of the first things a newborn nurse seems to teach a new parent is how to swaddle their baby.  While swaddling has been promoted to aid in calming a newborn as well as to help their sleep, the recommendation that the baby be placed on their back in their crib continues..  Many a baby looks like a little burrito…rolled up in the swaddle and then being placed on their back in the crib.

But is seems from this study that some babies were being swaddled and then placed on their side to sleep. Unfortunately, even a newborn may squirm enough that they then move from their side into the prone position.  Older infants who are swaddled may actually roll from their back to their tummies, even while swaddled. While the association between swaddling and SIDS remains unclear, I think this is a good reason to start getting a baby out of a swaddle once they are rolling. So around the 3 month mark I start having parents loosen the swaddle and try to just lay the baby on their back without being swaddled.

Let me re-iterate, this article does not confirm an association between swaddling and SIDS.  I do think it is a good reminder for putting a baby, “back to sleep” and once they are rolling “ditching” the swaddle seems to make even more sense. Once less thing to worry about, right?

 

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