Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Daily Dose

Back to School

1:30 to read

Schools around the country have opened their doors and some will be starting soon. This is the first week of school for most students in my area and parents have been busy in the last few days attending “back to school” and “meet the teacher” nights in preparation for a new school yea

So…every school has different rules, expectations and strategies for helping their students evolve into their “best” selves and as you get older the “rules” often change in hopes of making students more independent and responsible. I other words, getting ready for the “real world ‘ one day.

Catholic High School for Boys in Little Rock, Arkansas has recently been highlighted in the news and on social media for the sign that is posted on the entrance to the school. It reads “If you are dropping off your son’s forgotten lunch, books, homework, equipment etc, please TURN AROUND and exit the building”  Your son will learn to problem solve in your absence.”  The school posted the same message on their Facebook page as well.

According to the principal of the school, this has been a Catholic High rule for quite some time…it was also a rule at the high school my boys attended.  While some feel that this is unjust and that the students should be allowed to “phone home” if they have forgotten something, the school’s explanation is really fairly simple…allowing your child to have some “soft failures” and to learn both problem solving skills and responsibility will ultimately mold them into functioning members of society as they reach adulthood.  Sounds reasonable to me.

I know that as my boys went from elementary school, on to middle school and then high school their father and I had greater expectations that they needed to be responsible for getting their “stuff” to school.  We started off the school year with a game of sorts where you were given 3 “hall passes” for the year. I guess this started from something at school where they were given a hall pass to go to the bathroom or the office, and some teachers would hand out homework passes that allowed you to “skip” an assignment. So, each child ( this probably started in about 3rd or 4th grade) had 3 passes/year  where they could call and have us “rescue” them if they forgot something. Once you used up your “hall passes” you had to suffer the consequences of no lunch or turning in an assignment late.  Interestingly, each child was a bit different….one would use them up pretty quickly, another would “hoard” them for late in the year.  One wanted to know if they could be accrued? 

By the time they reached high school it was not a SHOCK when they were told the school rule that they could not call their parents.  It seems they figured out how to borrow money for lunch, or share with a friend, how to borrow a tie or jacket for an assembly and that turning in assignments a day late usually meant 10 points off. Not only did it help them become more organized and responsible, it also made me a working Mom “feel less guilt” that I really was not available to rescue them sometimes, even if I wanted to.  Do you think you would appreciate waiting in your pediatrician’s office (any longer than you may already) while they tried to run a homework assignment to school??  

You might try starting off the school year with a few hall passes and see if it works for your family!  

Daily Dose

Home From School

1:30 to watch

I continue to talk about it being  the “sick season” and thankfully it is now February!  Parents are all tired of having sick children and I can now at least assure them that we are halfway to the end of upper respiratory and flu season.

 

But, with that being said that means I am still seeing children with RSV, Flu and every other virus I can think of. Remember, the majority of the illness I see every day in my office is VIRAL.  It really doesn’t matter if you can put a name to the virus, as the treatment is the same. Rest, fluids, fever control and watch for any respiratory distress or symptoms of dehydration. As I told one young mother who said that her other child had been tested for RSV (by another doctor), testing the child I was now seeing will not make any difference in how we treat the illness. So, why make the child uncomfortable when doing the swab and also drive up health care costs, for no change in treatment recommendations.  I think people are confused about what the test actually does….it does not change how a child is treated, and it also causes a lot of “alarm” as the mother of one patient goes home to tell her friends that her child has RSV and then the school starts sending out emails and parents become more anxious and alarmed that they may have been exposed….as they are every day all over our city.

 

So…when do you know it is time to keep your child home from day care or school as we all know these viruses are spread at home, school and work as well.  

 

If your child has a fever over 100.5 degrees (by any method of taking their temperature) they should not go to day care or school for at least 24 hours after becoming fever free (without fever lowering medication).

 

If your child is vomiting, 2 or more times in the last 24 hours, they should stay home. Some young children may vomit after coughing as well, but if infrequent they may attend school. 

 

Diarrhea as defined by two or more loose, watery stools that are “out of the ordinary stool pattern” for your child. Any child having diarrhea that does not stay contained within a diaper should stay home. A child who has blood in their stool should not attend day care or school (and should see the doctor).

 

Children with strep throat may return to school after 24 hours if they are fever free and have received the appropriate antibiotic therapy.  (Newer article suggests 12 hours if they are feeling well).

 

Your child does not need to stay home due to a cold, cough, runny nose (of any color) or scratchy throat if they do not appear ill and do not have a fever. Look at how your child is behaving…some times a day of rest may be needed (even when you get sick, right?) 

 

Most importantly, it is not necessary to name the virus that your child might have, but to follow the guidelines for keeping them home (as well as out of stores, church, and after school activities) until they are feeling better. Wash hands, cover coughs and yes….still get the flu vaccine. It is not too late…the ground hog even said we still have a lot of winter left.

 

 

 

Your Child

Naps Help Preschoolers Learn Better

2.00 to read

There are two things adults envy about youngsters – their bountiful energy and their naps.

A new study says that those afternoon siestas that many preschoolers enjoy are not a waste of time.  In fact, a daily nap may improve their ability to learn by improving their memory skills.

Preschooler’s brains are busy. On a daily basis they are processing new and exciting information. Their brains are storing the input from these experiences in short-term storage areas said Rebecca Spencer, lead study author and a neuroscientist at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

"A nap allows information to move from temporary storage to more permanent storage, from the hippocampus to the cortical areas of the brain," she said. "You've heard the phrase, 'You should sleep on it.' Well, that's what we're talking about: Children need to process some of the input from the day."

Many of the nation's preschoolers put in longer days than do their working parents, arriving at school as early as 6:30 a.m. and getting picked up after 5 p.m., Spencer said. "We're all short on sleep, and the kid's sleep is affected by the parents' schedules," she said.

For the study, the researchers taught 40 children from six preschools in western Massachusetts a visual-spatial memory game in the morning. The children were asked to remember where nine to 12 different pictures were located on a grid.

During the afternoon, children were either encouraged to nap or to stay awake. Naps lasted about 80 minutes. Later in the afternoon and the following morning, delayed recall was tested between both groups -- children who were encouraged to sleep and those who were kept awake.

The researchers found that although the children performed similarly in the morning, when their retention was fresh, children forgot significantly more when they had not taken a nap. Those who had slept remembered 10 percent more than those who were kept awake. The next day, the kids who had napped the previous afternoon scored better than those who hadn't napped. The data showed that a child doesn't recover the memory benefit from nighttime sleep, the researchers said.

To better understand whether memories were actively processed during naps, the researchers took 14 preschoolers to a sleep lab for polysomnography, a sleep study that shows changes in the brain. The children took naps for about 70 minutes. The napping children showed signs of signals being sent to long-term memory from the brain's hippocampus.

"Thus, there was evidence of a cause-and effect relationship between signs that the brain is integrating new information and the memory benefit of a nap," Spencer said.

The study was published in the September issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Spencer is concerned about the trend in many public preschools to discontinue naps. She said naps need to be put back into the preschool day, and she wants to see exploration of ways to enhance the napping experience -- with darkened rooms and comfortable cots or pads, for example.

What’s the bottom line? "Naps are not wasted time," Spencer said.

Source: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_140919.html

Daily Dose

How To Soothe Back-To-School Jitters

1.45 to read

It is not uncommon for children to be both excited as well as apprehensive about the start to a new school year.Where has the summer gone?  Do you feel like I do and think, I blinked and POW it's back to school!  There's a lot of excitement for the new school year but some are feeling a bit nervous and anxious.

It is common for children to be both excited as well as apprehensive about the start to a new school year. Being a little worried about heading back to school is normal. Whether your child is going to the same school, but concerned about their new teacher, or starting a new school, the underlying uncertainty is normal. I can remember lying in bed the night before the first day of school and being so excited that I couldn’t sleep. I was always most excited about what “new outfit” I was going to wear. My mother had of course taken me shopping weeks before for the “back-to-school” skirt and sweater, and I just couldn’t wait to get to wear my new clothes. Back-to-school jitters are normal and should be discussed several days before school begins. It is very common for a child to have anxiety and stress related to a new school. But it is also not uncommon for children to worry about little changes related to such things as new lockers, cafeteria changes, a new teacher, or new friends. Some children will complain of tummy aches and headaches with the beginning of school. I am always reminded that I rarely hear children complain of a headache or tummy ache during summer vacations. These “aches and pains” are often a manifestation of a little underlying anxiety, and seem to be a September – June phenomena. A little parental reassurance will often help relieve those aches. The best plan for dealing with back-to-school jitters is to acknowledge the anxiety and plan on how to deal with it. Make sure that your child is rested for the first day of school and they have a good breakfast to start off the day. On the way to school discuss all of the positives for the new school year. Make your goodbyes short and sweet. Let your child know you will be there at the end of the day. Do not let your child see you upset, as sometimes parents too are anxious about the first days of kindergarten, high school or even college. Those back to school pictures are memorable and you will always like looking at the pictures with everyone smiling, even if your parental heart is a little sad at letting go. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

School & Infectious Disease

1:30 to read

I received an email this week from a patient…subject line: “potential exposure to Herpangina”.  In the body of the email was the following:

Dear Parents,

We want  to inform you that a case of Herpangina disease has been reported for a child at ….. room #112.  This is a contagious disease that  is spread by direct contact with another person or contaminated objects.  Herpangina is an illness caused by a virus, characterized by small blister-like bumps or ulcers that appear in the mouth, usually in the back of throat or the roof of the mouth. The child often has a high fever with the illness. We have attached further information about this common childhood illness published by Children’s Hospital in Boston. Our teachers are carefully disinfecting their room to help prevent further spread of the disease.

The mother of the child that sent me the email was “freaked” out and “worried” about  sending her child back to pre-school.  

My question is this, when did it become a “rule” to notify parents in a pre-school or day care setting that there were viral illnesses circulating?  It certainly seems unnecessary to me to send notification of EVERY childhood illness that occurs and for most of my families only serves to cause anxiety.  Some of the schools in our area post a sign on the entry that says something to the effect:  “there are cases of diarrhea, RSV, hand foot and mouth and fevers being reported in children that attend this school.”  Really, is it that surprising or necessary? Seeing that many of the numerous viral illnesses that children get these days are spread via respiratory droplets and contact with surfaces, such as toys and tables that everyone touches (computers too), children are exposed to things all of the time.  Do you go to work and ask your co-workers in a conference room..have you had diarrhea, a cough or a sore throat in the last day?

I understand notifying parents of illnesses, such as meningitis, measles, mumps…even chickenpox that are infectious and may be serious or life threatening. Thankfully, there are very few cases of these illnesses to report, now that the MAJORITY of children receive vaccines to these diseases. 

By putting these emails, texts and notices out for every parent to become alarmed about…and then to come to the doctor out of concern that their child  “may get sick….even before they have a symptom”,  serves no purpose. Herpangina and Hand Foot and Mouth are very similar viral illnesses, and both are caused by enteroviruses. It is at times hard to distinguish one illness from the other. But, with that being said, the treatment is solely symptomatic. In other words, treat the fever, make your child comfortable and don’t let them go back to school until they are fever free for 24 hours.  

Lastly, your child is going to catch a lot of these viruses, no matter what you do when they go out to play, shop or go to school. Each time they catch a viral illness it actually helps them to build antibody in order that their immune system may get stronger and stronger. I think the better note is….as winter comes children will get more coughs, colds and viral infections…if you think you child is not feeling well or running a fever, please keep them home from school for the day.  It is just a normal part of childhood…we don’t need any more anxiety in this world.   

 

Play
732 views in 6 months

Back to School, Back to Sleep!

Daily Dose

The Joy of a "Snow Day"

What a wonderful feeling to wake up and find that you and your kids have an unexpected holiday due to "inclement weather". That is still a vivid memory of my childhood too. While growing up in the northeast, the quiet of a snowy morning, only interrupted by an occasional snow plow, and hearing your parents tip toe into your room to let you know that you can snuggle back into bed for a little extra sleep, courtesy of the weather.

We are having one of those rare "snow days" in our area today, and no matter where you live, a day that you are stuck at home, forced to just "hang out" due to mother nature may be one for the memory books. These are the days to let your children sleep in, snuggle in your bed to watch cartoons together and stay in your pajamas until noon. You don't even feel lazy, or rushed or "guilty" because you just have to stay home due to snow and ice. Forced relaxation! Fixing a big breakfast together with the children or gathering everyone together to see what kind of soup you can concoct with whatever is in the pantry is always a must on a snow day. Children think chicken noodle soup or vegetable soup made with their help tastes so much better than anything you prepare for them. Snow days at my house mean soup and grilled cheese sandwiches, which are still one of the "grown kids" favorite foods, and they know how to make it too! Take advantage of this extra day with your children, as it really is a gift. Go outside for sledding in the neighborhood, or build that snowman together even if it is only 1 foot tall, and make sure to take pictures. These are days that memories are made. No pressure, no pre-planning, just another weather event, but maybe "MOTHER" nature knew how special this day could be for families. That's your daily dose for today, we'll chat tomorrow.

Play
3403 views in 1 year
Back to School

Back to School Stress

Your Child

Be an Involved Parent

2.00 to read

Millions of kids are back in school. For some it will be the start of a long educational journey, while others have already been in the system and are moving up to the next grade. Parents expect their children’s teachers to educate their kids, supervise their safety and keep them abreast of any changes or concerns they may see in their child’s behavior. Fair enough.

But what obligations should a parent have to their child’s education and school life? Many send their kids off to school and that’s that. Studies have shown and common sense tells you that the more involved a parent is with a child’s education at home and in school; the better a child learns and progresses.

Research has shown that children of involved parents are absent less frequently, behave better, make better grades from pre-school through high school and go farther in school.

They are often more socially mature and have a better sense of who they are.

The benefits don’t stop at school. A home environment that encourages learning is more important than parents' income, education level, or cultural background. By actively participating in their child's education at home and in school, parents send some critical messages to their child; they're demonstrating their interest in his/her activities and reinforcing the idea that school is valuable.

Not every parent has a lot of time they can spend with their child. The reality is that there are many single parent families. There are children who are being raised by a relative and children who are in foster care. Some schools are working on developing and implementing more flexible schedules that offer working parents options to spend extra time with their kids.

The National Education Association recommends some specific ways for parents to become more involved in their child's education.

At home:

- Read to your child. Reading aloud is the most important activity that parents can do to increase their child's chance of reading success

- Discuss the books and stories you read to your child

- Help your child organize his/her time

- Limit television viewing on school nights

- Talk to your child regularly about what's going on in school

- Check homework every night

Other tips for helping your child succeed in school come from teachers themselves.

- Teach your child to be prepared. No more excuses for late or not turned in homework

- Reinforce the importance of your child’s education. Whether you have a college degree, a high school education or dropped out let your child know that they are expected to complete school and continue with their education by either going to college or a trade school.

- Discuss newsworthy current events, and what is going on in your neighborhood, religious institution or pop culture. Listen to your child’s opinions with an open mind. Share your daily experiences in age appropriate language. The earlier a child feels an integral part of the family, the more they learn to value family, friends and others. Education includes a social awareness. 

- Go directly to the teacher of you have questions about your child’s progress or lack their of in school. Establish a good relationship with all your child’s teachers. Know their names and what they expect form your child. Let them know what you expect of them.

- Don’t try to get your child out of detention. Allow your child to accept the consequences of their behavior. Too many parents make excuses for their children’s bad behavior instead of facing it head on. Bailing your child out takes away their ability to learn responsibility. It can become an ugly habit and deprive your child of the maturity he or she will need to handle difficult situations. We all know there will be plenty of difficult times in everybody's lives. 

- Implement a consistent homework routine that focuses on relearning the day’s lessons.

- Respond to your school’s email and phone calls. Your child’s teacher is busy also and they wouldn’t be contacting you unless it was important. If you have concerns don’t wait to be contacted, be the one to reach out first.

- Volunteer. If at all possible volunteer to help with school or sports events. Showing your child that you are invested in them is the best way to teach them about unconditional love and sacrifice. Just knowing you care enough to give up some of your own precious time for them teaches them the true meaning of “I’ll always be there for you.”

When parents contribute effort and time, they have the opportunity to interact with teachers, administrators, and other parents. They can learn first-hand about the daily activities and the social culture of the school, both of which help them understand what their child's life is like.

Not every parent can be available for every school meeting or event. If you can’t make it, see if another family member or a close friend can be there in your place. For the 9 to 10 months that a child is in school – that is their world. Be a part of it, you’ll be glad you did and even if you get a little push back from your child, they’ll remember how much you cared when they're older and have kids of their own.

Sources: Anita Gurian PhD, http://www.aboutourkids.org/articles/involved_parents_hidden_resource_in_their_children039s_education

Pete Mason,  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/pete-mason/advice-from-teachers-to-p_b_3819530.html

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

How do you know if your child has strep throat?

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.