Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Your Teen

Most Parents Don’t Know Their Teen’s Vaccination Status

1:45

Most parents believe that they are on top of their kids’ immunizations, but that may not be true, especially where their teen is concerned.

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that adolescents are not getting all their recommended vaccinations, however, more than 90% of parents believe that their teenager had received all vaccinations necessary for their age, according to a C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll.

“In the United States, vaccines have long been recommended for babies and at kindergarten entry; more recently, several vaccines have been recommended for the adolescent age group,” Sarah J. Clark, MPHa research scientist from the Institute for Healthcare Policy & Innovation at the University of Michigan, and colleagues wrote. “However, data from the CDC indicate that national vaccination rates are well below public health targets, particularly those that require more than one dose, such as meningitis, human papillomavirus and annual influenza shots.”

The poll focused on vaccination for teenagers between 13 and 17 and included a national sample of parents.

Most parents had reported that their adolescent child had definitely (79%) or probably (14%) had all vaccinations recommended for their age, despite 36% of parents not knowing when their child is due for their next vaccine. The rest believed their child was due for their next vaccine within the next year (19%) or in more than a year (26%). One in five parents believed their teenager needed no more vaccines (19%).

The majority of parents polled relied on information about their child’s upcoming immunizations from their doctor’s office either through an office visit, scheduled appointment or a reminder that was sent. Rarely, would a notice be sent from the school, health plan or the public health department. A large number were not aware of how to be notified about upcoming vaccinations. 

"Parents rely on child health providers to guide them on vaccines in childhood and during the teen years,” Clark said in a press release. “Given the general lack of awareness about adolescent vaccines shown in this poll, there is a clear need for providers to be more proactive for their teen patients.”

Parents can be more proactive in finding out about their teens and younger children’s immunization requirements by checking their child’s school website or calling the school. The CDC also has a website with vaccination recommendations for children of all ages, including college students at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html

The 2017-2018 school year will be here before you know it. Many schools will start up again in mid to late August. Do yourself and your child a huge favor by getting their immunizations up-to-date before the last minute rush!

Story source: https://www.healio.com/pediatrics/vaccine-preventable-diseases/news/online/%7Be6c9d80d-86d4-48a7-9090-b1e489e6db56%7D/majority-of-parents-unaware-of-teens-incomplete-vaccination-status

Daily Dose

School & Infectious Disease

1:30 to read

I received an email this week from a patient…subject line: “potential exposure to Herpangina”.  In the body of the email was the following:

Dear Parents,

We want  to inform you that a case of Herpangina disease has been reported for a child at ….. room #112.  This is a contagious disease that  is spread by direct contact with another person or contaminated objects.  Herpangina is an illness caused by a virus, characterized by small blister-like bumps or ulcers that appear in the mouth, usually in the back of throat or the roof of the mouth. The child often has a high fever with the illness. We have attached further information about this common childhood illness published by Children’s Hospital in Boston. Our teachers are carefully disinfecting their room to help prevent further spread of the disease.

The mother of the child that sent me the email was “freaked” out and “worried” about  sending her child back to pre-school.  

My question is this, when did it become a “rule” to notify parents in a pre-school or day care setting that there were viral illnesses circulating?  It certainly seems unnecessary to me to send notification of EVERY childhood illness that occurs and for most of my families only serves to cause anxiety.  Some of the schools in our area post a sign on the entry that says something to the effect:  “there are cases of diarrhea, RSV, hand foot and mouth and fevers being reported in children that attend this school.”  Really, is it that surprising or necessary? Seeing that many of the numerous viral illnesses that children get these days are spread via respiratory droplets and contact with surfaces, such as toys and tables that everyone touches (computers too), children are exposed to things all of the time.  Do you go to work and ask your co-workers in a conference room..have you had diarrhea, a cough or a sore throat in the last day?

I understand notifying parents of illnesses, such as meningitis, measles, mumps…even chickenpox that are infectious and may be serious or life threatening. Thankfully, there are very few cases of these illnesses to report, now that the MAJORITY of children receive vaccines to these diseases. 

By putting these emails, texts and notices out for every parent to become alarmed about…and then to come to the doctor out of concern that their child  “may get sick….even before they have a symptom”,  serves no purpose. Herpangina and Hand Foot and Mouth are very similar viral illnesses, and both are caused by enteroviruses. It is at times hard to distinguish one illness from the other. But, with that being said, the treatment is solely symptomatic. In other words, treat the fever, make your child comfortable and don’t let them go back to school until they are fever free for 24 hours.  

Lastly, your child is going to catch a lot of these viruses, no matter what you do when they go out to play, shop or go to school. Each time they catch a viral illness it actually helps them to build antibody in order that their immune system may get stronger and stronger. I think the better note is….as winter comes children will get more coughs, colds and viral infections…if you think you child is not feeling well or running a fever, please keep them home from school for the day.  It is just a normal part of childhood…we don’t need any more anxiety in this world.   

 

Your Child

“Opt-Out” of Letting Schools Sell Your Child’s Personal Information!

2:00

If your child is in school, you may have unknowingly given the school the right to sell your child’s private information to data brokers and marketing companies. It happens every year and many parents don’t know they could have signed a form preventing the sale.

Schools are allowed by federal law to sell your child’s personal information to anyone unless you fill out an “opt-out “ form. If you don’t fill it out, personal information such as your child’s name, address, email, telephone number, age, gender, height and weight and photo can be sold.

Not only can your child be subjected to a ridiculous amount of advertising from marketing companies, anyone can use that information to locate your child if they really want to find him or her. They can also contact your child through personal emails or phone and have a picture to identify them.

"Directory information may sound innocuous, but it can include sensitive information about each student that is quite detailed," said Pam Dixon, executive director of the World Privacy Forum. "And after the school releases this data, it is considered to be public information and you've lost control of it. I don't think most parents know this."

Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), a student's directory information includes home address, email address, telephone number, date and place of birth, height and weight, the clubs or sports teams they've joined - even a photograph.

FERPA was written before the creation of the Internet, when a student's personal information was stored in a file cabinet and privacy was not such a big issue. Today, the data is just what a stalker, abuser or identity thief needs.

FERPA also gives parents the right to see what “directory information” the school has about their children. You have a right to block or limit access to that information. But, the window of time you can do that is short, sometimes just a few weeks after school begins. Once the time frame expires, you cannot stop the release of your child’s personal information until the next school year.

This is especially important for domestic violence survivors who are hiding from their abuser. Information that's released without their knowledge could jeopardize their safety.

"When there are situations where the survivor has left with the child and has custody of the child and they're living elsewhere, they want to know that their abuser doesn't know where they are living," said Kaofeng Lee, deputy director of the Safety Net Project at the National Network to End Domestic Violence. "If this information is available, the abuser could get access to where this child is going to school which will pinpoint exactly where the family is now living and make it possible to find them."

Many schools do not do a good job in letting parents know about the form. Some have even neglected to provide the form to parents and some schools have worded the forms in such a way as to discouraged parents from signing them.

It’s a battle for your child’s data and parents need to be aware that they have the right and the means to protect that information from getting out to marketing firms and individuals.

Congress is scheduled to review FERPA to see what further privacy protections are needed to keep students and families’ information private in the digital age. Until then, parents have to seek out and make sure that the opt-out forms are signed, sealed and delivered.

A warning to parents; this isn’t a one-time fix either. You must sign these forms every year that your child attends school.

Source: Herb Weisbaum, http://www.nbcnews.com/business/consumer/student-privacy-n423466

 

 

 

Daily Dose

Viruses Linger During End of School Year

Viruses linger during end of school year and disrupt many events. Dr. Sue explains what parents can do to keep their kids healthy.Well, it seems all students, from preschoolers through those in high school and college, are in full end of the school year mode. Graduations are ahead, from kindergarten through college, and of course there also seem to be several spring/summer viruses lurking around that are disrupting students (and parents) end of year plans.

Just like we have influenza during the winter months (and over the Christmas and New Year’s holidays), we also see other viruses that cause fever, myalgias (muscle aches), cough, congestion and sore throat, that are equally bothersome at this time of year.  While it is not influenza, other viruses such as  adenovirus, enteroviruses and parainfluenza virus (just to name a few), can make you run fairly high fever, feel horribly, have a sore throat and congestion and eventually a cough. Most viruses last anywhere from 7 -14 days, and for the first 2-4 days it is not unusual to see kids running fever, which only makes them feel that much worse.  Something about having a 103 degree fever, while the weather is in the 70’s to 90’s around the country, just doesn’t seem right! Unfortunately, these viruses don’t really care what we all have happening in our lives, and so you may find your child trying to wrap up end of school activities, but really needing to stay home for a few days due to illness. I am writing this as I have seen dozens and dozens of sick kids in the last few weeks with a litany of things to “do” before school ends. Parents bringing their sons and daughters in to my office for “the cure” so that they may attend the end of preschool party, or the field trip, prom or graduation.  I only wish that I had “the cure”. As we have discussed so many times, viruses are bigger and brighter than the best minds, and they cannot be cured in 12 hours with a magic shot of penicillin (although I must say some doc in the boxes still do this).  Despite my best efforts as a physician (and a mother too), the only thing that really cures a viral illness is “tincture of time”, which no one seems to have any more. I am not pointing fingers, because I am guilty of feeling like that too.  I only wish that I could get everyone, including my own children, better in time to attend all of these important functions!!  Viruses always occur at the most inconvenient times. One mother has brought her son to see me both in my office and by my house in hopes of finding “something” that we can treat. She has thrown out options like “antibiotics, inhalers, vitamins and steroids” in hopes of getting him better faster. Now throughout this illness, he like many others has “drug” his sick body out of bed to attend “special” events, all the while running fever and coughing. So, he is indeed contagious and might spread the virus to others. Whether intentional or not, viruses are spread very easily, especially in the close contact that our adolescents all have. I LOL when a parent says “my child has not been around anyone that is sick”!!  But of course they have.  The viruses are at  school, at  after school activities, while sharing water bottles on the sports field, or sandwiches at lunch, our children are exposed. Then throw in all of the parties going on now and it is perfect storm for germs to spread. So bottom line, if your child has a fever, they should stay home.  Rest, fluids, fever control and time are really the only cures.  But thankfully, I feel certain that one of these bright students will one day find the “CURE” for the viral illnesses that we all dread, and they will be a Nobel Prize winner. Not only that, they will be loved by all parents who want to figure out how to  “fix” their child in time for  the next party or event! That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue now!

Your Child

Healthy Diet Improves Reading Skills

1:00

Good nutrition not only improves your child’s physical condition but may also advance his or her reading abilities, according to a new Finnish study.

Researchers in Finland found students' reading skills improved more between first grade and third grade if they didn't eat a lot of sugary foods or red meat, and if their diet consisted mainly of vegetables, berries and other fruits, as well as fish, whole grains and unsaturated fats.

The study involved 161 students between the ages of 6 and 8 (first through 3rd grade). Researchers reviewed the children's diets and their reading ability using food diaries and standardized reading tests.

The study showed that a healthier diet was associated with better reading skills by third grade, regardless of how well the students could read in first grade, the researchers said.

"Another significant observation is that the associations of diet quality with reading skills were also independent of many confounding factors, such as socioeconomic status, physical activity, body adiposity [fat] and physical fitness," study author Eero Haapala said in a University of Eastern Finland news release. He is a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Eastern Finland and the University of Jyvaskyla.

As with most studies, the research did not prove cause and effect, but an association between the foods the students ate and their reading skills.

The study's authors noted that parents, schools, governments and corporations all have an opportunity to enhance academic performance in schools by making healthy foods more available to children.

The study was published recently in the European Journal of Nutrition.

Story source: Mary Elizabeth Dallas, https://consumer.healthday.com/vitamins-and-nutrition-information-27/food-and-nutrition-news-316/healthy-diet-may-boost-children-s-reading-skills-714811.html

 

 

Daily Dose

Is Your Child Ready for Kindergarten?

Parents often ask me about their child’s readiness for kindergarten. It seems more common in different parts of the country to “hold back” younger five-year-olds rather than sending them on to kindergarten. In other words children who will be five over the summer, just in time to start school by the September 1 cut off.

I am often confused as to why it is becoming more common to “hold a child back”, as someone is always going to be the youngest in a class, just as someone is the smartest, the tallest, the loudest etc. At the same time, I know that there are circumstances when a child may not be deemed to be “kindergarten ready” but those cases should be looked at individually. I do not think that the birth date alone should not be the deciding factor. All of a child’s experiences leading up to kindergarten are educational in some manner and help to promote school readiness. The R’s of reading (which I think should be started by parents while their child is still an infant), rhyming and playing (which probably does not include video games), setting routines, rewarding success (from potty training to learning to write their name), and lastly relationships are important factors in school readiness. Most children have developed these skills from some combination of family life, day care or preschool, church and friendships. The cumulative experiences of early childhood are the stones on the road to future learning. The most significant developmental markers that predict success in kindergarten are both social and emotional. The importance of embracing a school community, respecting teachers, becoming self-sufficient while at school, and enjoying new friendships in combination with the love of learning are the developmental milestones to be achieved during the kindergarten year. Not every five-year-old is ready to read, and some are more fidgety than others, while some will write their full names and addresses on the first day. But kindergarten is still the “entry level” job and everyone needs to start there on the road to being a CEO. Unless there are “red flags” as to specific learning issues I would not recommend “holding “ your child back simply due to being young. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Home From School

1:30 to watch

I continue to talk about it being  the “sick season” and thankfully it is now February!  Parents are all tired of having sick children and I can now at least assure them that we are halfway to the end of upper respiratory and flu season.

 

But, with that being said that means I am still seeing children with RSV, Flu and every other virus I can think of. Remember, the majority of the illness I see every day in my office is VIRAL.  It really doesn’t matter if you can put a name to the virus, as the treatment is the same. Rest, fluids, fever control and watch for any respiratory distress or symptoms of dehydration. As I told one young mother who said that her other child had been tested for RSV (by another doctor), testing the child I was now seeing will not make any difference in how we treat the illness. So, why make the child uncomfortable when doing the swab and also drive up health care costs, for no change in treatment recommendations.  I think people are confused about what the test actually does….it does not change how a child is treated, and it also causes a lot of “alarm” as the mother of one patient goes home to tell her friends that her child has RSV and then the school starts sending out emails and parents become more anxious and alarmed that they may have been exposed….as they are every day all over our city.

 

So…when do you know it is time to keep your child home from day care or school as we all know these viruses are spread at home, school and work as well.  

 

If your child has a fever over 100.5 degrees (by any method of taking their temperature) they should not go to day care or school for at least 24 hours after becoming fever free (without fever lowering medication).

 

If your child is vomiting, 2 or more times in the last 24 hours, they should stay home. Some young children may vomit after coughing as well, but if infrequent they may attend school. 

 

Diarrhea as defined by two or more loose, watery stools that are “out of the ordinary stool pattern” for your child. Any child having diarrhea that does not stay contained within a diaper should stay home. A child who has blood in their stool should not attend day care or school (and should see the doctor).

 

Children with strep throat may return to school after 24 hours if they are fever free and have received the appropriate antibiotic therapy.  (Newer article suggests 12 hours if they are feeling well).

 

Your child does not need to stay home due to a cold, cough, runny nose (of any color) or scratchy throat if they do not appear ill and do not have a fever. Look at how your child is behaving…some times a day of rest may be needed (even when you get sick, right?) 

 

Most importantly, it is not necessary to name the virus that your child might have, but to follow the guidelines for keeping them home (as well as out of stores, church, and after school activities) until they are feeling better. Wash hands, cover coughs and yes….still get the flu vaccine. It is not too late…the ground hog even said we still have a lot of winter left.

 

 

 

Your Child

Study: Exercise, Once Again, Improves Kid’s Learning Skills

2:00

While the debate on whether to bring back recess to school curriculums continues across the U.S., a small study from the Netherlands once again shows that adding exercise to a child’s school day can improve their learning skills.

Researchers worked with 500 children in second and third grade, giving half of them traditional lessons while the rest received instruction supplemented with physical activity designed to reinforce math and language lessons.

The approach was a creative and unique way to helping children better comprehend math and spelling.  Instead of taking a recess break – exercise was actually incorporated into the lesson.

After two years, children who got the physically active lessons had significantly higher scores in math and spelling than their peers who didn't exercise during class.

"Previous research showed effects of recess and physical activity breaks," said lead study author Marijke Mullender-Wijnsma, of the University of Gronigen in The Netherlands.

"However, we think that the integration of physical activity into academic lessons will result in bigger effects on academic achievement," Mullender-Wijnsma added in an email to Reuters Heath.

Mullender-Wijnsma and colleagues developed a curriculum that matched typical lessons in academic subject matter but added physical activity as part of instruction. They tested it in 12 elementary schools.

Here’s how it worked.

Lessons involved constant practice and repetition reinforced by body movements. For example, children jumped in place eight times to solve the multiplication problem 2 x 4.

Children in the exercise group received 22 weeks of instruction three times a week during two school years. These lessons were up to 30 minutes long, and evenly split between math and spelling instruction.

During the first year of the study, there wasn’t a great deal of difference found between the students receiving exercise during the class and those that didn’t, when speed was the focus in the math tests.

However, after two years, children who received exercise-based instruction had significantly higher scores on the math speed exams than students who didn't. The difference over two years equated to more than four months of additional learning for the students who had physically active lessons.

When the focus was on lesson comprehension, students receiving exercise outperformed students who did not receive the exercise instruction in both the first and second year. Again, the progress amounted to about four more months of learning.

For spelling, there wasn't a significant difference between the student groups after one year. But by the end of the second year they did have significantly better test scores, once again, adding an additional four more months of learning.

For reading, there wasn’t much difference between the two groups. It's possible that physical activities may be more beneficial to learning that involves repetition, memorization and practice of lessons from previous classes, the researchers conclude.

Researchers did point out that there were limitations that could have impacted the results of the study during the first year. The exercise group received specially trained teachers and individual schools administered the tests.

The research team did not examine why exercise might have helped students do better during tests.

 Sara Benjamin Neelon, of Johns Hopkins University and colleagues write in an accompanying editorial that it’s not clear whether these types of classes would work in countries where the population is larger, more diverse and students come from different socioeconomic backgrounds.

"However, the take-home message for parents and teachers is that physically active lessons may be a novel way to increase physical activity and improve academic performance – at the same time," Benjamin Neelon said by email.

More and more studies show that exercise appears to help the brain function better in children and adults. Whether all U.S. school administrations will see adding recess or exercise back into school curriculums is anybody’s guess, but according to science – it sure couldn’t hurt and might even help students develop stronger learning skills.

The study was published in the online journal Pediatrics.

Story source: Lisa Rapaport, http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-children-fitness-learning-idUSKCN0VX26V

Your Child

Good Sleep Habits Help Kids Succeed in School

1:30

If you’ve ever been sleep deprived, you know how difficult it can be to focus and get through the demands of the day.

So it’s not surprising that a new study says that children, who have good sleeping habits by the age of five, do better when they start school.

However, what may surprise you is that according to the National Sleep Foundation, a 2004 poll revealed that 69 percent of children 10 and under experience some type of sleep problem such as insomnia, nightmares, restless legs syndrome, sleep terrors, sleepwalking and sleep apnea.

For this study, researchers reviewed the sleep behavior of nearly 2,900 children in Australia from birth until they were 6 or 7. They found that one-third had mounting sleep problems in their first five years that put them at added risk for attention disorders and emotional and behavioral problems in school.

"The overwhelming finding is it's vital to get children's sleep behaviors right by the time they turn five," researcher Kate Williams said in a Queensland University of Technology news release. Williams is on the faculty in its School of Early Childhood.

For many families, today’s social and home environment is a roller coaster ride; creating solid routines, winding down and focusing on good sleep habits has almost become a lost art.

Williams and her team found that children with increasing sleep problems in early childhood were apt to be more hyperactive and to have more emotional outbursts in the classroom.

"If these sleep issues aren't resolved by the time children are 5 years old, then they are at risk of poorer adjustment to school," she noted.

There are lots of online tips for helping children develop good sleeping habits. These are usually in every list:

·      No video games, TV or electronic gadgets for at least an hour before bed.

·      Set a bedtime and stick to it that allows for plenty of sleep.

·      Follow a routine – brush teeth, wash hands and face and settle in for sleep. Reading a book to your little one can help relax them.

·      Make sure their room is dark and cool when it’s time for light’s out.. If your child needs a night light, place it in the hallway or bathroom and leave the door ajar. Turn it off once they are asleep.

·      Avoid giving your child candy or food right before bedtime. Certain foods can be stimulating and creating the habit of eating before bed or during the night is a hard one to break.

·      Make sure your child is comfortable. Pajamas should not restrict movement. Blankets shouldn’t be so heavy as to cause them to be hot or too warm.

Story sources: Robert Preidt, http://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/education-news-745/children-sleep-school-qut-release-batch-2570-708848.html

https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-topics/children-and-sleep

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

If your child snores, is this a sign of something more serious?

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.