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Your Child

Frito-Lay Recalls Pretzels Due to Peanut Residue

2:00

Many children, who are allergic to peanuts and other nuts, consume pretzels as a snack.

Frito-Lay announced they are voluntarily recalling certain Rold Gold Tiny Twists, Rold Gold Thins, Rold Gold Sticks and Rold Gold Honey Wheat Braided due to a potential undeclared peanut allergen.

This recall is the direct result of a recent recall by a Frito-Lay supplier of certain lots of flour for undeclared peanut residue. The Rold Gold products subject to the recall may have been produced using the recalled flour and, as a result, these Rold Gold products may contain low levels of undeclared peanut residue. More information about the flour recall can be found on the FDA’s website at: http://www.fda.gov/Food/RecallsOutbreaksEmergencies/SafetyAlertsAdvisories/ucm504002.htm.

The affected Rold Gold packages are sold in retail stores and via foodservice and vending customers throughout the United States, and have “guaranteed fresh” dates ranging from June 28, 2016 - August 23, 2016 on the front of the package. Directly underneath the “guaranteed fresh” date is a 9-digit manufacturing code that includes the numbers “32” in the second and third position (example: x32xxxxxx).

The following products with the above-described “guaranteed fresh” dates and manufacturing codes are impacted:

•       Rold Gold Tiny Twists - 1 oz. , 2 oz., 16 oz. and 20½ oz.

•       Rold Gold Thins - 4 oz. and 16 oz.

•       Rold Gold Sticks - 16 oz.

•       Rold Gold Honey Wheat Braided - 10 oz.

It is important to note that products that do not include 32 in the second and third positions of the manufacturing code are not impacted.

The Rold Gold Tiny Twists are also included in select multipack offerings. The impacted multipacks have “use by” dates on the front of the package. Directly next to or underneath the “use by” date is a 11-digit manufacturing code that will include the letter combination AM, TO, QH, QC or SW in the second and third position (example: xAMxxxxxxxx). The impacted products have different, varying “use by” dates, including:

•       20 count Baked & Popped Mix -- “use by” dates ranging from May 31 - July 26, 2016

•       20 count SunChips & Rold Gold Mix -- “use by” dates ranging from June 14 - August 9, 2016

•       32 count Fun Times Mix -- “use by” dates ranging from June 14 - August 9, 2016

•       30 count Baked & Popped Variety Pack -- “use by” dates ranging from June 14 - August 9, 2016

•       30 count Home Town Favorite Variety Pack -- “use by” dates ranging from May 31 - July 26, 2016

To date, Frito-Lay has received no reports of illness related to the products covered by this recall. No other Rold Gold products or flavors are impacted. Frito-Lay has informed the FDA of our actions.

Consumers with any product noted above can return the product to retailer for a full refund, or contact Frito-Lay Consumer Relations (9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. CST, Mon.-Fri.) at 1-888-256-3090 or www.pretzelrecall.com.

Story source: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm505365.htm

 

Daily Dose

Teen Drivers

1.30 to read

As you know, when teens start to drive, I am a huge advocate for parent - teen driving contracts. I wrote my own contracts for my boys but I recently found a website that all parents who are getting ready to have teen drivers need to be aware of.

Injuries from motor vehicle crashes are the #1 cause of death for teens in the United States.  Studies have shown that having limits and boundaries in place for new drivers reduces the number of motor vehicle accidents that new drivers experience. Although not all states have “graduated driver’s licenses”, all parents can have discussions about the privilege and responsibility of driving and set their own guidelines for their new teen driver.

The website www.youngdriverparenting.org was developed by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and is an interactive site for both parent and teen.  The program is entitled “Checkpoints”.  The website includes teen driving statistics to help parents keep their teen drivers safe as well as giving information about state-specific teen driving laws.

The site has a great interactive component to help parents create their own parent-teen driving “contract” that addresses such things as teen driving hours, number of passengers allowed, and boundaries for driving. These parameters can be modified as the teen becomes more experienced and meets the “checkpoints” that were agreed to.  It is a great site as it not only gives you a template for the agreement, but sends emails as the allotted amount of time has passed for each step of the contract.  You don’t have to remember what you and your teen agreed to, they email you and then you and your child can revisit the agreement and expand it over time as your driver becomes more experienced.

Instead of handing out my “dog eared” old driving contracts that I wrote for my boys, I am now going to send my patients to this site (which is also being sustained by the American Academy of Pediatrics).  

Teen drivers whose parents are actively involved in monitoring their driving are not only less risky drivers but know ahead of time what their parent’s expectations are. Having a teen involved proactively with driving rules is far preferable to regretting that limits, boundaries and parental rules were not discussed prior to allowing your new driver on the road.

The website is not only free it is also evidence based, and within 5 - 10 minutes of reviewing the site a family is set to go with their own checkpoint agreement.  Here’s to teen driver safety!

Daily Dose

Why Kids Should Wear a Helmet

1:30 to read

Accidents in children are always an ever present problem. From scraped knees, to bumped heads, broken arms and stitches there are always injuries in our children. Accidents in children are always an ever present problem. From scraped knees, to bumped heads, broken arms and stitches there are always injuries in our children. Thank goodness most of them are traumatic at the moment, usually more to the parent than the child, and the child quickly recovers and is on to the next thing.

One way to help protect our children is by using protective "gear" when appropriate. We are really good about using car seats, child proofing houses and pools for the toddler set, but as the children get older there are other dangers lurking around with the bicycles, scooters, skateboards and the newest rip stick. All of these "wheeled" devices pose dangers for falls and "wipe outs" that may lead to things as mild as cuts and scrapes or as serious as a head injury. The hardest thing to get a school age child to understand is the meaning of the word ACCIDENT.

They do not understand that even if they think they have mastered the bike or rip stick, an accident can happen at any time. When I am talking to the elementary school set and ask them about mastering a bicycle on two wheels they are so proud to tell me of their accomplishments. But when I ask them what they are wearing on their head while riding, I don't always hear "a helmet". Children and adults on bicycles need to wear helmets at all times. I see kids riding their bikes to school (great exercise), but not a helmet in sight on their head. Don't let your child on their bicycles without a helmet, insist on a helmet just like a seat belt. If they become accustomed to always putting on a helmet before hopping on that bike or skateboard it will just become second nature. If they choose not to wear their helmet, then put the bike in "time out" for awhile to let them know that you are not going to allow them to ride without protection. Knee pads and wrist guards are great, but we can usually set a wrist fracture, or stitch up a knee. A head injury is another story!

That's your daily dose, we'll chat tomorrow.

Your Child

Talking to Your Child About Tragic News Events

2:00

Another tragedy has taken place, this time a terrorist attack in Paris, France.  Children, adolescents and adults have lost their lives or been seriously injured while out for an evening of fun, errands or romance.  Media outlets have been covering the events, sometimes showing graphic video or photos from the bloody scenes.

When children view these images or hear the stories, they can become scared and worried that the same thing will happen to them. 

Whenever catastrophic local, national or global events take place, it’s easy to assume that your child doesn’t really know what is going on or understand the gravity. But, in this age of instant and abundant information, they most likely do. Children are very sensitive to their parents and friends’ feelings. They are more tuned in than you might think.

Children sense when their parents are really worried, whether they're watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a crisis, it's especially disconcerting for them to realize that their parents are scared, angry or shocked.

When bad things happen, children want to know what is going on.  It doesn’t have to be an international event. Local tragedies such as a flood, tornado, shooting, kidnapping, suicide, house fire or car wreck can be more frightening to children than events taking place across the world or in another state.

So, how do you talk with your child about such unhappy and threatening things? I’ve turned to Mr. Rogers to share with you his calming and thoughtful insights. The first time he addressed this topic was after Robert Kennedy’s assassination. Parents and educators turned to him for guidance then and his advice still holds true today.

In times of crisis, children want to know, "Who will take care of me?" They're dependent on adults for their survival and security. They're naturally self-centered. Their world is small and their life experience is limited. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to know that people in the government, in their community and in the world, and other people they don't even know, are working hard to keep them safe, too.

One of the ways young children express feelings is through play. However, sometimes events that happen are violent, so parents need to be nearby to redirect play if it takes a turn in that direction. More nurturing play can help children process the different activities and needs that happen around certain types of events. Play involving being a doctor or nurse in a hospital setting or creating a pretend meal for emergency workers or families can help children understand that there are good people and helpful actions that also take place when something bad happens.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet accidents may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as we adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children can experience a more calming sense of security.

When shocking event happens, it’s easy to get drawn into watching the news for hours and hours. Think back to 9-11 when there was non-stop coverage for days with repeated video of the towers being hit and falling. It created post-traumatic stress disorder, nation-wide. As hard as it is for adults to assimilate, it’s even harder for children. Once you have the information, turn the TV off or find something else for your kids to watch. Monitor their online activity as well to see if they are seeing too much graphic information or too many stories of “What if this happened here?”

Exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed, feelings that even young children can sense. We help our children-and ourselves-if we're able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them-away from the frightening images on the screen.

Limiting our child’s media exposure doesn’t mean we don’t talk about what has happened with them.

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If very young children ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, "What do you think happened?" If the answer is, "I don't know," then the simplest reply might be something like, "I'm sad about the news, and I'm worried. But I love you, and I'll take care of you."

If we don't let children know it's okay to feel sad and scared, they may try to hide those feelings or think something is wrong with them whenever they do feel that way. They certainly don't need details of what's making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Your child’s age and emotional IQ should be your guide on how much detail you go into when discussing tragic events. Very young children do not need a lot of detail. Children 7 and under are most concerned with safety. They need to know that you and they are secure. That’s why it important to keep the TV at a minimum for kids in this age group. They can identify strongly to pictures of other young children in peril or crying because they’ve lost someone dear to them. At this age, kids are most concerned with separation from you.  Assure them that you are watching out for them and will protect them.

Children between the ages of 8 and 12 will often notice the morality of events.  You may have to explain the basics of prejudice, bias, and civil and religious strife. But be careful about making generalizations, since kids will take you at your word. This is a good time to ask them what they know, since they'll probably have gotten their information from friends, and you may have to correct facts. This age group will most likely be online more. While it’s still important to keep news viewing under control, online viewing and searching should be monitored as well. It’s a good age to discuss lots of views and opinions about events. Read stories together and then ask them what they think.

Teens will probably get their news independently of you. Talking to them can offer great insights into their developing senses of justice and morality. It will also give you the opportunity to throw your own insights into the mix, but don’t dismiss their opinions or insights just because they may not be the same as yours. They will shut down communication quickly if they feel their ideas are not being valued.  Discuss the ways that different media covers events. Again, ask them what they think.

Having to discuss tragic or scary events with our children isn’t new. Generations of parents have had to address various topics from volcano eruptions that wiped out an entire city to the Holocaust to the cold war. But how we get our information has changed dramatically. Media in one form or another is prolific with gory images and misinformation available at the touch of finger. So parents have to react quicker and with more assurance and details than they would probably like. But that’s what we do. We protect our children in all ways, as best we can, with loving and clear information.

Sources:  http://pbskids.org/rogers//parentsteachers/special/scarynews-thoughts.html

Carolyn Knorr, https://www.commonsensemedia.org/blog/explaining-the-news-to-our-kids

 

Your Child

Backpack Safety Tips for Kids & Parents

1:30

Backpacks have almost become a part of every student's uniform.  They’re not only filled with schoolbooks but often clothes, pencils and papers, notebooks, lunches, phones, computers and an assortment of other items.  All that stuff adds up in the amount of weight resting on your child’s back and shoulders.

When used correctly, backpacks can be a good way to distribute excess weight evenly. However, backpacks that are too heavy or are worn incorrectly can cause problems for children and teenagers. Improperly used backpacks may injure muscles and joints. This can lead to severe back, neck, and shoulder pain, as well as posture problems.

The American Academy of Othopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) has these backpack tips for helping your child avoid injuries and soreness from almost every day use.

Choosing the right backpack:

When choosing a backpack, look for one that is appropriate for the size of your child. In addition, look for some of the following features:

               ·      Wide, padded shoulder straps

•       Two shoulder straps

•       Padded back

•       Waist strap

•       Lightweight backpack

•       Rolling backpack

Injury Prevention:

To prevent injury when using a backpack, do the following:

•       Always use both shoulder straps when carrying the backpack. The correct use of both of the wide, well-padded shoulder straps will help distribute the weight of the backpack across the child�s back.

•       A cross-body bag can also be a good alternative for carrying books and supplies.

•       Tighten the straps to keep the load closer to the back.

•       Organize the items: pack heavier things low and towards the center.

•       Pack light, removing items if the backpack is too heavy. Carry only those items that are required for the day, and if possible, leave unnecessary books at home or school.

•       Lift properly by bending at the knees when picking up a backpack.

Tips for Parents:

Parents also can help.

•       Encourage your child or teenager to tell you about numbness, tingling, or discomfort in the arms or legs, which may indicate poor backpack fit or too much weight being carried.

•       Watch your child put on or take off the backpack to see if it is a struggle. If the backpack seems too heavy for the child, have them remove some of the books and carry them in their arms to ease load on the back.

•       Do not ignore any back pain in a child or teenager.

•       Talk to the school about lightening the load. Team up with other parents to encourage changes.

•       Encourage your child to stop at his or her locker when time permits throughout the day to drop off or exchange heavier books.

•       If your child has back pain that does not improve, consider buying a second set of textbooks to keep at home.

Backpacks are great for carrying school bound objects – they help kids keep organized and help prevent assignments and school information from being lost. Because they can carry so much, it’s easy for them to become overloaded for your child’s size and muscle strength. Make sure your little one isn’t carrying too big a load and knows how to properly lift and strap on his or her backpack.

Story source: http://orthoinfo.aaos.org/topic.cfm?topic=A00043

 

Parenting

Back to School Road Safety Tips

2:00

Millions of U.S. children are starting a new school year and along with the joy and excitement comes traffic congestion.

It's never more important for drivers to slow down and pay attention than when kids are present – especially before and after school.

The National Safety Council offers these tips to drivers sharing the road with parents and caregivers dropping off or picking up their kids and school busses loading and unloading students.

If you’re dropping off your children, familiarize yourself with the specific drop off rules of your child’s school. More children are hit by cars near schools than at any other location according to the National Safe Routes to School program. These tips can apply to all school zones:

·      No double-parking. It blocks the visibility for other children and drivers.

·      Don’t load or unload kids across the street from the school

·      Carpool to reduce the number of vehicles at the school.

When you’re sharing the road with young pedestrians, remember these safety tips:

  • Don't block the crosswalk when stopped at a red light or waiting to make a turn, forcing pedestrians to go around you; this could put them in the path of moving traffic
  • In a school zone when flashers are blinking, stop and yield to pedestrians crossing the crosswalk or intersection
  • Always stop for a school patrol officer or crossing guard holding up a stop sign
  • Take extra care to look out for children in school zones, near playgrounds and parks, and in all residential areas
  • Don't honk or rev your engine to scare a pedestrian, even if you have the right of way
  • Never pass a vehicle stopped for pedestrians
  • Always use extreme caution to avoid striking pedestrians wherever they may be, no matter who has the right of way

Most likely, you’ll be sharing the road with school busses as well as other cars. A school bus is large, allow a greater following distance than if you were driving behind a car. It will give you more time to stop once the yellow lights start flashing. It is illegal in all 50 states to pass a school bus that is stopped to load or unload children.

  • Never pass a bus from behind – or from either direction if you're on an undivided road – if it is stopped to load or unload children
  • If the yellow or red lights are flashing and the stop arm is extended, traffic must stop
  • The area 10 feet around a school bus is the most dangerous for children; stop far enough back to allow them space to safely enter and exit the bus
  • Be alert; children often are unpredictable, and they tend to ignore hazards and take risks

Cars and busses aren’t the only vehicles on the road around a school; there are also kids on bikes.  On most roads, bicyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as drivers. Bikes can be hard to see though, particularly small ones with little riders. Children riding bikes create special problems for drivers because usually they are not able to properly determine traffic conditions. The most common cause of collision is a driver turning left in front of a bicyclist.

  • When passing a bicyclist, proceed in the same direction slowly, and leave 3 feet between your car and the cyclist
  • When turning left and a bicyclist is approaching in the opposite direction, wait for the rider to pass
  • If you're turning right and a bicyclists is approaching from behind on the right, let the rider go through the intersection first, and always use your turn signals
  • Watch for bike riders turning in front of you without looking or signaling; children especially have a tendency to do this
  • Be extra vigilant in school zones and residential neighborhoods
  • Watch for bikes coming from driveways or behind parked cars
  • Check side mirrors before opening your door

School zone speed lights will soon be or are already flashing, so you’ll have to retrain your eyes to look for them. By exercising a little extra care and caution, drivers and pedestrians can co-exist safely in school zones.

Story source: http://www.nsc.org/learn/safety-knowledge/Pages/back-to-school-safety-ti...

Daily Dose

Button battery Dangers

1.15 to read

I saw a patient the other night who was having difficulty swallowing and her parent’s thought that she had swallowed something. She was a toddler and had been playing with her sister and then suddenly started coughing and having a hard time swallowing. When  saw her she seemed to be “ok” but looked like she was having a hard time swallowing and wouldn’t eat or drink.  Fortunately she was not having any respiratory distress. 

Her parents were not sure of what she might have swallowed, but the first thing that comes to mind is that she might have swallowed a button battery.  Button battery ingestions are on the rise as more and more devices like remote controls, games and other household objects use the 3 volt 20 millimeter lithium batteries.  

An article in the May issue of Pediatrics reported that there were nearly 66,000 battery related ER visits by children under the age of 18 during a 20 year span. More than 75% of all battery related hospital visits involved children 5 or younger. 

Because of the article and her presentation I immediately sent her to the ER for an x-ray to look for a possible ingestion of a foreign body.  Ingestion of a button battery is considered a medical emergency so it is important that the diagnosis is made quickly. In most cases the battery will pass into the stomach and then be “pooped” out. 

There are reports of parents finding a battery in the stool and never knowing that the child had ingested a foreign body. But, if the battery lodges in the esophagus it may result in alkaline burns and corrosion and perforation of the esophagus. The longer the battery remains in the esophagus and GI tract the greater the chance for complications. 

Good news is that this little girl had swallowed a foreign object, but it was not a battery but a barrette used for her sister’s hair.  The pediatric ENT doctors were able to scope her and remove the barrette without problems and she is as good as new! 

But, if you ever think your child may have swallowed “something” make sure to consider those button batteries. Better yet, childproof all of those devices in the house by taping them shut and keep all batteries up and out of reach of children.   You know a toddler, they will put anything in their mouths, just not the foods that you are trying to get them to eat! 

That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

 

Your Toddler

Anchor It!

1:45

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has launched “Anchor It”, a national public education campaign, to help make people aware of the dangers that free-standing furniture and TVs present, particularly to children.

The annual number of children injured or killed from furniture and TV tip-overs is astounding.

According to CPSC data, unstable and unsecured TVs and large pieces of furniture kill a child every two weeks, on average, in tip-over incidents that are easily preventable.  CPSC also reported that 38,000 Americans go to emergency rooms each year with injuries related to tip-overs of top-heavy furniture or televisions placed on furniture, instead of a TV stand.  Two-thirds of those injuries involved children younger than 5.  Additionally, between 2000 and 2013, 84 percent of the 430 deaths reported to CPSC involved children younger than 10.

A January 2015 CPSC report found that a television tipping over from an average size dresser falls with thousands of pounds of force. 

The impact of a falling TV is like being caught between two NFL linemen colliding at full-speed—10 times. 

“Every 24 minutes in the U.S. a child goes to the emergency room because of a tip-over incident involving furniture or a TV,” said CPSC Commissioners Marietta Robinson and Joseph Mohorovic. “We must take action now. CPSC’s new ‘Anchor It!’ campaign is a call to action for parents and caregivers to ‘get on top of it, before they do.’ If we can prevent one more death, it will be worth it.”

Cards and posters are being distributed parents and caregivers of toddlers at daycare centers and preschools. A list of safety steps parents and caregivers can take are printed on the handouts. They are:

·      Buy and install low-cost anchoring devices to prevent TVs, dressers, bookcases or other furniture from tipping.

·      Avoid leaving items, such as remote controls and toys, in places where kids might be tempted to climb up to reach for them.

·      Store heavier items on lower shelves or in lower drawers.

·      Place TVs on a sturdy, low base and push them as far back as possible, particularly if anchoring is not possible.

·      If purchasing a new TV, consider recycling older ones not currently used. If moving the older TV to another room, be sure it is anchored properly to the wall.

The “Anchor It” campaign’s website (www.Anchorit.gov) shows you how to anchor furniture and television sets properly, with easy to follow instructions. Keep your little one safe and Anchor It!

 

Parenting

Health Official: Zika Outbreaks Likely in U.S.

2:00

The United States can expect to see outbreaks of the Zika virus says Dr.Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

While the U.S. has already seen more than 350 cases of people who were infected abroad and returned to the country, there haven’t been any recorded cases of someone infected within its borders. But those days may be limited, said Fauci.

"It is likely we will have what is called a local outbreak," he said on Fox News Sunday with Chris Wallace.

Since being detected in Brazil last year, the virus has spread through the Americas. It has been linked to thousands of cases of microcephaly, a typically rare birth defect marked by unusually small head size, which often indicates poor brain development. The World Health Organization declared a global health emergency in February.

Zika, which is spread by mosquitoes and through sexual contact, can give adults the paralyzing Guillain-Barre syndrome. The Aedes aegypti mosquito, which primarily transmits disease, is already present in about 30 U.S. states.

While Fauci does expect someone to be bitten by the mosquito here in the States, he does not expect a large number of people to become ill.

"It would not be surprising at all - if not likely - that we're going to see a bit of that," he said. "We're talking about scores of cases, dozens of cases, at most."

He also raised the prospect that other neurological ailments could be eventually linked to Zika, which he called "disturbing."

"There are only individual case reports of significant neurological damage to people not just the fetuses but an adult that would get infected. Things that they call meningoencephalitis, which is an inflammation of the brain and the covering around the brain, spinal cord damage due to what we call myelitis," he said. "So far they look unusual, but at least we've seen them and that's concerning."

Fauci has pressed the administration’s case for budgeting $1.9 billion dollars in emergency funds to fight the virus.

"We have to act now," he said. "I can't wait to start developing a vaccine."

Still, Fauci refrained from recommending that U.S. women avoid becoming pregnant because of fear of giving birth to a baby with microcephaly.

"Right now in the United States they should not be that concerned. We do not have local outbreaks," he said.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), no vaccine currently exists to prevent Zika virus disease. The mosquito that carries the Zika virus mostly bites in the daytime.

The CDC recommends following typical mosquito bite preventions such as:

•       Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.

•       Stay in places with air conditioning and window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.

•       Sleep under a mosquito bed net if you are overseas or outside and are not able to protect yourself from mosquito bites.

•       Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents with one of the following active ingredients: DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or para-menthane-diol. Choosing an EPA-registered repellent ensures the EPA has evaluated the product for effectiveness. When used as directed, EPA-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective, even for pregnant and breast-feeding women.

◦       Always follow the product label instructions.

◦       Reapply insect repellent as directed.

◦       Do not spray repellent on the skin under clothing.

◦       If you are also using sunscreen, apply sunscreen before applying insect repellent.

•       To protect your child from mosquito bites:

◦       Do not use insect repellent on babies younger than 2 months old.

◦       Do not use products containing oil of lemon eucalyptus or para-menthane-diol on children younger than 3 years old.

◦       Dress your child in clothing that covers arms and legs.

◦       Cover crib, stroller, and baby carrier with mosquito netting.

◦       Do not apply insect repellent onto a child’s hands, eyes, mouth, and cut or irritated skin.

◦       Adults: Spray insect repellent onto your hands and then apply to a child’s face.

•       Treat clothing and gear with permethrin or purchase permethrin-treated items.

◦       Treated clothing remains protective after multiple washings. See product information to learn how long the protection will last.

◦       If treating items yourself, follow the product instructions carefully.

◦        Do NOT use permethrin products directly on skin. They are intended to treat clothing.

Story sources: Diane Bartz, http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-zika-usa-idUSKCN0XE0UV

http://www.cdc.gov/zika/prevention/

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DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

Do antacids work for babies?

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