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Your Baby

IKEA Recalls 169,000 Crib Mattresses

1:30

Swedish furniture maker IKEA is recalling about 169,000 of their VYSSA crib mattress because of the risk that infants can become trapped between the mattress and the crib.

The firm has received two reports of infants becoming entrapped between the mattress and an end of the crib. The children were removed from the gap without injury.

The mattresses were sold exclusively at IKEA stores and online from August 2010 to May 2014 for about $100.00.

This recall involves IKEA VYSSA style crib mattresses with the following five model names:

·      VACKERT

·      VINKA

·      SPELEVINK

·      SLÖA

·      SLUMMER.

The involved mattresses were manufactured on May 4, 2014 or earlier. An identification label attached to the mattress cover has the date of manufacture in Month-DD-YYYY format and the VYSSA model name. A gap between the mattress and crib ends larger than two-finger width is an indication of the defective mattress.

Consumers should inspect the recalled mattress by making sure there is no gap larger than the width of two fingers between the ends of the crib and the mattress. If any gap is larger, customers should immediately stop using the recalled mattresses and return it to any IKEA store for an exchange or a full refund.

Consumers can contact IKEA toll-free at (888) 966-4532 anytime or online at www.ikea-usa.com and click on the recall link at the top of the page for more information.

Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2015/IKEA-Recalls-Crib-Mattresses/

Daily Dose

Teen Driving

1:30 to read

 It’s funny that I often find myself reading articles in the newspaper or online, or even watching a TV segment, only to find that an “issue” that I have thought was important for years is “newsworthy” again.  The most recent example being on the topic of teenage drivers and the importance of parental involvement.

I feel like it was not too long ago that I was talking to my own sons about driving….and at that time Texas did not have a lot of rules around getting your driver’s license, besides being 16 an enrolled in school. (thankfully the laws in Texas have changed since then).  So after much discussion about the perils of teenage driving and knowing that the death rate due to an automobile accident topped the list for teens,  my husband and I  came up with a driving contract (which I have shared with too many to count), which clearly outlined the rules and expectations for our sons when they began to drive. I can also remember the oldest looking at the 3 page typed contract and announcing, “ I am not going to sign that!”.  If I remember correctly my husband’s calm reply was, “OK - then don’t drive”. He is a man of few words..but very convincing. 

Fortunately for us, all of our sons did sign the contract, knew the consequences and started off driving our family Suburban…and never had a serious accident (so many prayers as they pulled out of the driveway).  One son did back into a fence, and another hit a car in a parking lot….but I felt fortunate that that was the extent of their accident history.  

According to a recent article in the NY Times there is a time to be a helicopter parent, and that is when your “child” begins to drive.  “In 2013, just under a million teenage drivers were involved in police reported crashes, which resulted in 373,645 injuries and 2,927 deaths”.  These statistics are probably under-reported, and it is estimated that “one in four teens are going to be in a crash in their first six months of driving,” and one would hope that these would be minor “fender benders”, which as we told our sons, do count as an accident.

The biggest risk for a new teenage driver occurs when you add passengers to the car.  According to Dr. Nicole Morris at the University of Minnesota  “adding one non family passenger to a teenager’s car increased the rate of crashes by 44%, and that risk doubles with a second passenger and quadruples with 3 or more”. If your teen is not distracted by their passengers they are likely to be using their phones to stay in touch with their friends….either by text, talking or by checking their various social media sites….all while driving. Although teens state, “ I barely take my eyes off the road”, anything more than 2 seconds can be deadly. Better to turn off the phone and all notifications before your teen hits the road.

Teens should be reminded that driving is a privilege, and parents of teenage drivers need to have ongoing discussions surrounding expectations for obtaining the privilege of driving. Parents need to be knowledgable about teenage driving and their states’ laws - and enforce those, (too many parents of my patients seem to ignore some of the laws - such as limiting passengers in the car). Even if your state does not have laws regulating a step wise progression to full driving privileges (so called graduated driver’s licenses), parents may adopt their own to help ensure their teens safety. Earning more and more independence can be proven with time and a good driving record and the adage, “nothing good happens after midnight still stands”.  

If ever there is a time to be a hovering involved parent it when your child begins to drive - it has been proven to save lives.

 

     

Daily Dose

Summer Means Head Lacerations

Parents are often frantic (as we all can be) when their child falls and you see blood coming from the head and face.Last weekend I had several phone calls about head lacerations. Summer is the season for accidents and it seems the weekends are always the busiest.

Parents are often frantic (as we all can be) when their child falls and you see blood coming from the head and face. Luckily, in most cases there is more blood than one would expect for the size of the injury, as the head is well vascularized and therefore even a small laceration will cause a lot of bleeding. The first thing to do is to get the child calmed down (and you too) and try and wash the area to really get an idea as to how large the laceration is. The patient who called could not get her child to let her look at her head (which showed that her child was okay if she could put up that much of a fight) so we had the idea of taking her toddler to the shower with the mother and to wash off there. That worked wonderfully and by then both mother and child had calmed down. Once you can see the cut, try to establish how deep and wide it is, and then see if you can stop the bleeding with pressure to the cut. If it is a scalp wound and you can stop the bleeding and it is not too deep I often do not put a child through stitches as their hair will cover the scar. That is the antithesis to a facial laceration when we are all concerned about cosmetic appearance and even a smaller cut might get one or two stitches in order to have the best cosmetic result. If in doubt, take your child to the doctor or run them by your pediatrician's house (that works great for me on weekends) in order to decide if stitches are needed. Some clean cuts may be closed with a wonderful product called "Dermabond" which is almost like "super glue" for skin. Do NOT use super glue which one of my own children thought about using for an injury while they were at college. Thank goodness they called home first! Just remember that a lot of blood does not always mean a huge injury. That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

Water Safety

1:15 to read

I was reminded of the importance of pool safety after watching the news and hearing that 3 children were found in a nearby apartment pool, under water and unresponsive.  

There are about 3,500 fatal unintentional drownings per year, which is about 10 deaths per day.  Drowning is the second leading cause of death in children ages 1-14 years.  For every child who dies from drowning, there are 4 non-fatal drowning victims who suffer severe and life changing injuries.

Drowning is preventable!!  Although many people think of drowning victims screaming and yelling, drowning is actually quick and silent.  It only takes seconds (the time to grab a towel, or answer the phone) and a child may become submerged. Most drownings also occur in family pools.  Because I have always had a fear of drowning we did not build a pool until our boys were all older than 10 years and were excellent swimmers ( was I a bit over zealous with swim lessons and swim team, maybe...)?  Children as young as 2-3 years can safely begin swim lessons and begin the process of mastering how to tread water, floating and basic swim strokes. 

Another rule for safe swimming is “never swim alone!”.  Teach your children the importance of the buddy system when they are swimming, even in a backyard pool. Adults need to be designated “water watchers” and know that they are responsible for watching the children in the pool and will never leave them unattended. The “water watcher” should regularly scan the bottom of the pool, and will need to have a phone at the pool for emergency use only.  Adult water watchers have only 1 job...to watch the pool, no poolside chatting or distractions. It is a big job!

Anyone with a pool or who is a caregiver of children who are swimming needs to become CPR certified.  CPR skills can save lives and prevent brain damage.   

Lastly, if you have a pool you need layers of protection - which  means a barrier around your pool. I have heard many a family tell me that their child “could never get out the door to the pool, it has several locks and an alarm”.  Despite the best of intentions, no parent can watch their child 24 hours/day.  Toddlers have been known to push a stool over to unlock a door, or a door is inadvertently left unlocked or ajar. Remember, it only takes seconds for a child to become submerged. 

By the way, I am following my own advice and a pool fence is going up to protect our granddaughter...the bigger the better.

Parenting

Family Road Trip!

1:45

With gasoline prices at a reasonable level, many families may choose to skip the hassles of flying and opt for a road trip this summer.

While it may be true, “The best made plans of mice and men often go awry”, it’s still necessary to prepare as best you can for a family road trip; whether it’s to the Grand Canyon, the beach, the grandparents or all of the above.

Before the trip, make sure that the car is in good condition. Have it checked out by a mechanic and any trouble spots fixed. The tires should have plenty of tread and the recommended amount of air for highway travel.

Once you’re ready for the big trip, here are some suggestions to help make it a little less stressful and more fun.

Packing the car:

·      Pack an easily accessible small bag that contains clothes for the next day, an extra change of clothes (for spills), PJs, a toothbrush, and anything else you need for that day and night. It will be much easier to grab than trying to rummage through the big suitcase.

·      Take your toddler or young child’s blanket and pillow. This is extra important if your road trip includes an overnight stay. Kids like their own stuff, particularly at bedtime in a strange place.

·      Babies and toddlers drop, spill, and spit up. Keep a roll of paper towels and a box of wipes in the front seat for easy cleanups. Keep a garbage bag handy too.

The Ride:

Boredom is probably the biggest instigator of trouble for kids packed into a tight space. Prepare to fight boredom with a few tricks of your own.

·      Snacks. Although it only provides a short respite, any quiet time is appreciated. Go light on the sugar – too much can backfire. Choose fresh or dried fruit, whole grain muffins, popcorn, cheese sticks, milk etc. In other words, something healthy and age appropriate.

·      Portable DVD players. These can be a lifesaver. Load up on your children’s favorite movies and don’t forget the headsets if you have different aged kids. Eleven year-olds and three year-olds don’t typically share the same taste in movies and video games. New DVDs they haven’t already seen are a bonus. Let the kids pick out what they want to watch ahead of time. And, make sure you have an extra set of headsets; you know someone is either going to lose a pair or break a pair. That’s a given.

·      If there is more than one adult traveling – one of you can get in the backseat for a while. A little face-to-face contact, some patty-cake, and a few tickling games go a long way toward distracting a cranky baby or a bored toddler.

·      Make sure some favorite toys are within easy reach. You might add a new toy or two your little one hasn’t seen before. Remember etch-a-sketch? Tech savvy youngsters are coming up with some amazing etchings these days!

·      Don’t forget to plan for stops. You'll have to stop for feedings, diaper changes, and stretching breaks. You'll be much less stressed if you accept that it may take twice as long to get there as it did in your pre-kid days and plan accordingly. Pre-teens and teens are going to need to move around too. Besides, sitting for an extended length of time isn’t good for anyone.

Oh, and someone is going to need a potty break soon after the pre-arranged stop has happened. Be patient and pull over, it’s really a lot easier and less taxing than a yelling match about “why didn’t you go when we stopped 30 minutes ago?”

·      If your trip requires an overnight stay somewhere, think about booking a motel that has an indoor pool. It may cost a little more, but it's something to look forward to, and it will help your children sleep better. If they sleep better, you’ll probably sleep better too.

·      Don’t forget about books (or e-books) for the kids that like to read. Coloring books for the younger ones, and brush up on some travel games the whole family can join in on. Here are a few tried and true suggestions. I Spy (I spy with my little eye, something red.) The License Plate Game. Keep a list of all the different state license plates you see. The goal is to list as many states as possible- although Hawaii might be a real challenge anywhere but in Hawaii. The Memory Game. Start a story with one sentence. The next person has to say that sentence then add his or her own sentence to the story. The story can change pretty quickly as everyone tries to remember all the previous sentences and then come up with a new one.

While road trips can be a challenge, they are always an adventure and often become fond memories, as kids grow older.

Have fun this summer and don’t forget to take lots of pictures!

Story source: http://www.parents.com/fun/vacation/ideas/traveling-with-kids-ultimite-guide/

 

Daily Dose

Leaving Your Child Home Alone

1.00 to read

I get asked the questions a lot "At what age can I leave my child home alone?"  There is no simple answer but a progressibe one.

I tend to think most children are ready to spend 20-30 minutes alone at home between the ages of 10-11, but every child is different.  It depends on a number of things including how your child feels about being alone, the length of time, and if you and your child have discussed how to handle emergencies and getting a hold of you or a neighbor in case there is an emergency or even just a question that needs to be answered.  

Well, this topic brought up an interesting question, what do you do when you leave your child alone and there is not a home phone?  I have never even given that a thought as I am “old school” and still have that landline in my house. It just gives me a “good feeling” to know that it is there, even if it rarely rings. (although the kids know to call the home number as I typically turn off the cell as soon as I hit the door from work).   

More and more families have given up a home phone and I think this brings up so many different topics for discussion, but for starts how does your child call you when you leave them alone?  Or how do they call the trusty neighbor if they need something.  Do you get them a cell phone? Do you have to have an extra cell phone to have at home?  It seems to me that a home phone is important for just that reason. In case of an emergency, your child can pick up the phone and call for help, assistance or just a friendly voice. I don’t think they need a cell phone!  

Also, landlines are relatively inexpensive. Cell phones for 8,10, 11 year olds?  Sounds inappropriate and expensive.  Wouldn’t it be easier to keep a home phone so children can learn to answer a phone, use good phone manners, and when you are ready to let them stay at home by themselves for a few minutes, there is always a phone available. I don’t know, just seems easy solution to me.    

What do you think? I would love to hear from you!

 

Daily Dose

Swim Lessons Can Reduce Risk of Drowning

1:15 to read

Now that hot weather is with all of us, the issue of childhood drowning is an ever-present concern. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that after the age of five years, all children be taught to swim. The AAP does not recommend for or against swimming lessons as a measure to prevent drowning in children younger than five years. Between 2000 and 2005, 6,900 children died from non-boating accidental drowning. The rate of drowning was almost four times higher for children one to two years of age, and twice as high for those younger than five.

An article in Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine looked at the association between swimming lessons and risk of drowning specifically in the one to four year old age groups. Previous concerns had been raised about the potential for swimming lessons to increase the risk for drowning in younger children. This study provided good news that kids aged one to four who have taken formal swimming lessons have an 88% less risk of drowning. Researchers found that only three percent of the children who had drowned had taken swimming lessons. So with this news, it might be prudent to start swimming lessons at a younger age than previously thought.

But swimming lessons alone will not prevent drowning and even in this study, many of the older children who drowned were noted to have been proficient swimmers. It is still important to have other drowning prevention strategies in place including pool fencing (some parents with pools feel like their child will not be able to unlock a door and head to the pool and do not have a fence in place, and I totally disagree with that argument), constant and age appropriate adult supervision and training in CPR. Children are amazing at finding ways to unlock doors, and windows that lead outside and no parent can know where their child is for every minute of the day. If you have a pool and a child is missing always check the pool first, as a child can quietly slip into the water and lose consciousness in as little as two minutes and drown in five minutes.

That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow.

Your Baby

Recall: DaVinci Baby Cribs

1:45

Bexco has expanded a recall of their baby cribs. Bexco recalled an additional 11,600 cribs in July 2015.

The firm has received five additional reports of the mattress support brackets breaking and detaching. No injuries have been reported.

A metal bracket that connects the mattress support to the crib can break, creating an uneven sleeping surface or a gap. If this occurs, a baby can become entrapped in the crib, fall or suffer lacerations from the broken metal bracket.

This recall includes DaVinci brand full-size cribs including the Reagan crib (model #M2801), the Emily crib, (model #M4791), the Jamie crib (model #M7301), and the Jenny Lind crib (model #M7391) manufactured from May 2012 through December 2012.

The model number, serial number and manufacture date are printed on a label affixed to the bottom right hand side panel of the crib. Cribs included in the recall have serial numbers that begin with “N00,” followed by one of the following numbers.  The previous recall included the same model numbers, but had different serial numbers.

The cribs were sold at Target and juvenile products stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com from May 2012 to December 2013 for between $150.00 and $250.00.

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled cribs and contact Bexco for a free replacement mattress-support that includes replacement brackets.  In the meantime, parents are urged to find an alternate, safe sleeping environment for the child, such as a bassinet, play yard or toddler bed depending on the child’s age.

Consumers can contact DaVinci toll-free at 888-673-6652 from 8:30 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. PT Monday through Friday. Consumers can also visit www.davincibaby.com/safetyrecall3 or www.davincibaby.com and click on “Safety Recall” for more information.

Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2016/Bexco-Expands-Recall-of-DaVinci-Brand-Cribs/

Parenting

Back to School Road Safety Tips

2:00

Millions of U.S. children are starting a new school year and along with the joy and excitement comes traffic congestion.

It's never more important for drivers to slow down and pay attention than when kids are present – especially before and after school.

The National Safety Council offers these tips to drivers sharing the road with parents and caregivers dropping off or picking up their kids and school busses loading and unloading students.

If you’re dropping off your children, familiarize yourself with the specific drop off rules of your child’s school. More children are hit by cars near schools than at any other location according to the National Safe Routes to School program. These tips can apply to all school zones:

·      No double-parking. It blocks the visibility for other children and drivers.

·      Don’t load or unload kids across the street from the school

·      Carpool to reduce the number of vehicles at the school.

When you’re sharing the road with young pedestrians, remember these safety tips:

  • Don't block the crosswalk when stopped at a red light or waiting to make a turn, forcing pedestrians to go around you; this could put them in the path of moving traffic
  • In a school zone when flashers are blinking, stop and yield to pedestrians crossing the crosswalk or intersection
  • Always stop for a school patrol officer or crossing guard holding up a stop sign
  • Take extra care to look out for children in school zones, near playgrounds and parks, and in all residential areas
  • Don't honk or rev your engine to scare a pedestrian, even if you have the right of way
  • Never pass a vehicle stopped for pedestrians
  • Always use extreme caution to avoid striking pedestrians wherever they may be, no matter who has the right of way

Most likely, you’ll be sharing the road with school busses as well as other cars. A school bus is large, allow a greater following distance than if you were driving behind a car. It will give you more time to stop once the yellow lights start flashing. It is illegal in all 50 states to pass a school bus that is stopped to load or unload children.

  • Never pass a bus from behind – or from either direction if you're on an undivided road – if it is stopped to load or unload children
  • If the yellow or red lights are flashing and the stop arm is extended, traffic must stop
  • The area 10 feet around a school bus is the most dangerous for children; stop far enough back to allow them space to safely enter and exit the bus
  • Be alert; children often are unpredictable, and they tend to ignore hazards and take risks

Cars and busses aren’t the only vehicles on the road around a school; there are also kids on bikes.  On most roads, bicyclists have the same rights and responsibilities as drivers. Bikes can be hard to see though, particularly small ones with little riders. Children riding bikes create special problems for drivers because usually they are not able to properly determine traffic conditions. The most common cause of collision is a driver turning left in front of a bicyclist.

  • When passing a bicyclist, proceed in the same direction slowly, and leave 3 feet between your car and the cyclist
  • When turning left and a bicyclist is approaching in the opposite direction, wait for the rider to pass
  • If you're turning right and a bicyclists is approaching from behind on the right, let the rider go through the intersection first, and always use your turn signals
  • Watch for bike riders turning in front of you without looking or signaling; children especially have a tendency to do this
  • Be extra vigilant in school zones and residential neighborhoods
  • Watch for bikes coming from driveways or behind parked cars
  • Check side mirrors before opening your door

School zone speed lights will soon be or are already flashing, so you’ll have to retrain your eyes to look for them. By exercising a little extra care and caution, drivers and pedestrians can co-exist safely in school zones.

Story source: http://www.nsc.org/learn/safety-knowledge/Pages/back-to-school-safety-ti...

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DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

Count your blessings this Thanksgiving!

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