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Recall: Britax B-Agile and BOB Motion Strollers

2:00

About 676,000 Britax B-Agile and BOB Motion Strollers with Click & Go receivers have been recalled. A damaged receiver mount on the stroller can cause the car seat to disengage and fall unexpectedly, posing a fall hazard to infants in the car seat.

Britax has received 33 reports of car seats unexpectedly disconnecting from the strollers and falling to the ground, resulting in 26 reports of injuries to children, including scratches, bruises, cuts and bumps to the head. In addition, Britax is aware of 1,337 reports of strollers with damaged Click & Go receiver mounts.

This recall involves Britax B-Agile and BOB Motion strollers (when used as a travel system with a car seat carrier attached). All models are folding, single or double occupant strollers and have Click & Go receiver mounts that attach the car seat carrier to the stroller frame. All colors of the stroller are included. The model number can be found on the inside of the stroller’s metal frame near the right rear wheel for single strollers and in the front middle underside of the frame on double strollers.

Consumers should immediately stop using their Click & Go receiver mounts and contact Britax for a free repair kit for single strollers.  Owners of the recalled double strollers should stop using them with car seats attached. Consumers can continue to use their stroller or car seat independently without the car seat attached to the stroller.

Consumers can contact Britax online at www.us.britax.com and click on the Safety Notice on the homepage or visit us.britax.com/recall, call toll-free at 844-227-0300 from 8:30 a.m.to 7 p.m. ET Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET Saturday or email Britax at stroller.recall@britax.com.

Recalled models numbers include:

B-Agile:

S01298600, S01298700, S01635200, S02063600, S02063700, S02063800, S02063900, S02064000, S03803400, S03803500, S03803700, S03803800, S03803900, S04144400, S04144500, S04144600, S04144700, S04144800, S04144900, S04145000, S04183700, S04183800, S04184000, S04281200, S04281300, S04402800, S04437700, S04628500, S04884200, S04884300, S04884400, S04884500, S04975600, S04978900, S05060600, S05260200, S05511600, S05511700, S865800, S865900, S874300, S874400, S874500, S877200, S890100, S896000, S896200, S896600, S907200, S907300, S907400, S907500, S907600, S910200, S910300, S910400, S910500, S912300, S914300, S914500, S914700, S914900, S915200, S915400, S917400, S921800, S921900, S923700, U341763, U341764, U341782, U341783, U341825, U341826, U341828, U341X82, U34X782, U361763, U361818, U361819, U361825, U391875, U451835, U451837, U451841, U461763, U461764, U461782, U461783, U461825, U461826, U461828, U471818, U471819, U491842, U491843, U491844, U491908, U491909, U491910, U511875, U511877, U551835, U551837, U551841, U551861, U551862, U551863, U551864, U551865, U551905, U551906, U691878, U691879, U691881, U691882, U691884, U691904, U691905, U721895, U721896

BOB Motion:

S888600, S890200, S890300, S890400, S890500, S909700, S910600, S910700, S910800, S910900, S912600, U391820, U391821, U391822, U481820, U481821, U481822, U501820, U501821, U501822, U501907

Images of the strollers can be seen below.

Story Source: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/Britax-Recalls-Strollers

Daily Dose

Leaving Your Child Home Alone

1.00 to read

I get asked the questions a lot "At what age can I leave my child home alone?"  There is no simple answer but a progressibe one.

I tend to think most children are ready to spend 20-30 minutes alone at home between the ages of 10-11, but every child is different.  It depends on a number of things including how your child feels about being alone, the length of time, and if you and your child have discussed how to handle emergencies and getting a hold of you or a neighbor in case there is an emergency or even just a question that needs to be answered.  

Well, this topic brought up an interesting question, what do you do when you leave your child alone and there is not a home phone?  I have never even given that a thought as I am “old school” and still have that landline in my house. It just gives me a “good feeling” to know that it is there, even if it rarely rings. (although the kids know to call the home number as I typically turn off the cell as soon as I hit the door from work).   

More and more families have given up a home phone and I think this brings up so many different topics for discussion, but for starts how does your child call you when you leave them alone?  Or how do they call the trusty neighbor if they need something.  Do you get them a cell phone? Do you have to have an extra cell phone to have at home?  It seems to me that a home phone is important for just that reason. In case of an emergency, your child can pick up the phone and call for help, assistance or just a friendly voice. I don’t think they need a cell phone!  

Also, landlines are relatively inexpensive. Cell phones for 8,10, 11 year olds?  Sounds inappropriate and expensive.  Wouldn’t it be easier to keep a home phone so children can learn to answer a phone, use good phone manners, and when you are ready to let them stay at home by themselves for a few minutes, there is always a phone available. I don’t know, just seems easy solution to me.    

What do you think? I would love to hear from you!

 

Daily Dose

The Danger in BPA Bottles

I have been getting plenty of question about BPA in your-baby bottles.I recently received an email from a parent who’s 4 year old son is a patient of mine, and she is pregnant and due with a your-baby girl in the next month. On top of all of that she is also a pediatrician. At any rate, her question was regarding BPA (bisphenol A) in bottles, and whether I thought she should throw out bottles that she had used with her son in favor of newer bottles. I will tell you that her son is a perfectly delightful, bright, inquisitive and developmentally normal little boy and he received breast milk and formula from BPA containing bottles.

With that information, and knowing that I am thrifty, I thought long and hard and decided that in my opinion I would toss the old bottles in favor of the newer BPA free bottles. The top manufacturers of your-baby bottles voluntarily stopped using BPA in their bottles at the end of 2008. These bottles include, Dr. Brown, Avent, Playtex, Evenflo and numerous others. It is easy to find BPA free bottles that are well marked and most large chain stores are no longer selling your-baby bottles containing BPA. The cost involved to replace old bottles seems minimal, and the data regarding the safety of BPA to infants and children continues to be released with more ongoing studies underway. There will be more data available in the coming months and years. The Endocrine Society who held their annual meeting last week presented “worrying” evidence about the effects of BPA , including the statement that “endocrine disruptors (which includes BPA) do have effects on male and female development, prostate cancer, thyroid disease, and cardiovascular disease”. There are concerns that infants and children may be particularly susceptible to BPA and possible long term effects on brain development and behavior. So, with these recent studies and more concern regarding the levels of BPA found in your-baby bottles as well as comparison data of exposure to BPA between breast and bottle fed infants, it seems prudent to me to purchase newer bottles that are BPA free. Cross this issue off of the mother worry list. The cost of new bottles is minimal as compared to future concerns about BPA. That's your daily dose for today. We'll chat tomorrow!

Your Child

Hand Sanitizers Poisoning Young Children

2:00

Poison control centers across America have been seeing an increase in calls about children who are getting very sick from drinking hand sanitizers. Poison control officials are warning parents and school officials about this dangerous trend involving small children, basically getting drunk, on hand sanitizer.

“A doctor called us about a week and a half ago about two cases he saw the same day at the ER,” says Gaylord Lopez, PharmD, director of the Georgia Poison Center. “It was a 5- and a 6-year-old.”

The first patient, a 6-year-old girl, was picked up after school stumbling and slurring her words. She’d also fallen and hit her head. Her mother drove her straight to the ER, where doctors found out she’d eaten two to three squirts of strawberry-scented hand sanitizer from a big container sitting on her teacher’s desk.

Her blood alcohol level was 1.79, almost twice what would be considered the legal limit in an adult.

The second case was a 5-year-old boy, who came in with a blood alcohol level of 2.0. The culprit was hand sanitizer.

Lopez checked the national data and saw these cases were part of an unrecognized trend. In 2010, U.S. poison centers got more than 3,600 calls about kids under age 12 eating hand sanitizers. By 2013, that number had swelled to more than 16,000 calls.

“That’s a 400 percent increase,” Lopez says. “I was surprised more than anyone.”

Many of the hand sanitizer bottles come in bright colors and the sanitizer itself smells like bubble gum and other tasty treats such as lemonade and vanilla. All aromas a child might mistake for the real thing.

The big problem with these products are that they can be anywhere from 40 to 95 percent alcohol.

Drinking even just little bit can make kids intoxicated. It’s like drinking a shot or two of hard liquor.

“You and I don’t have any problem sending our kids with hand sanitizer in their backpacks. But what if I told you that was twice as potent as vodka. That’s like a parent sending a bottle of whiskey or rum to school,” Lopez says.

Alcohol poisoning can cause a child’s heart rate, blood pressure and breathing to slow. They may stagger, seem sleepy and vomit. Their blood sugar can drop rapidly leading to seizures and coma.

Lopez says hand sanitizers are often included in the list of school supplies parents should send to school. He says many adults he’s talked to don’t realize that hand sanitizers contain so much alcohol, or they don’t realize that it’s the kind of alcohol that can cause intoxication.

“I wanted to get the word out. Parents should be aware. Teachers should be aware.”

If you have hand sanitizer at home, keep it out of the reach of young children. If you send hand sanitizer with your child to school- especially during the flu and cold season- use the wipes instead.

You can learn more about hand sanitizer poisoning by calling the American Association of Poison Control Center for free advice at 1-800-222-1222.

If you suspect your child may have ingested sanitizer and is showing any of the above symptoms, take your child to the hospital immediately.

Source: Brenda Goodman, MA, http://www.webmd.com/children/news/20150915/hand-sanitizers-poisoning-kids

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July 4th

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Daily Dose

Teens & Safe Driving

1.30 to read

Teenage driving and specifically driving safety is getting more and more traction in the news. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has just launched the 5 To Drive campaign to reinforce last week’s "National Teen Driver Safety Week".  All of these campaigns are encouraging parents to initiate discussions with their teen drivers about safety. 

I have long been a propionate of driving contracts and luckily my three sons  abided by the contract and never had a “significant” accident. There were a few of the “I backed into the fence”, or “I just didn’t see the car when I backed out of the parking space”, but beyond that we were blessed with accident free teen years.  I also believe that they were maybe a bit more cautious because they had to pay for 1/2 of their insurance premium each year, as well as having other perks (like gas) tied to their grades.  Having some of their own hard earned money in the game made them realize consequences for accidents would also mean higher insurance premiums and more money out of their wallets.  

The NHTSA safety topics for parents to discuss with their teens are: 

No cell phone use or texting while driving - no exceptions
No extra passengers - parents also need to follow their own state laws on this topic as graduated drivers licenses enforce different lengths of time before allowing teens any extra passengers (which are definitely distracting)
No alcohol
No driving or riding without a seat belt 
No speeding 

There were 2,105 teen drivers involved in fatal crashes in 2011 and 45% of the teens involved died in those wrecks as well. The topics for parents to discuss with their teens are on the list as all of these behaviors seen in adolescent drivers are known to contribute to the high death rate among teens. 

Another recent study from Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia in collaboration with State Farm Insurance found that “teenagers were 50% less likely to crash when parents set clear rules, kept track of their teens activities and did so in a supportive manner”.

Take the time to discuss the safe driver rules and model behavior while you are at the wheel as well. Distracted driving affects everyone.....as I continue to remind myself to stay off the phone in the car, even though I finally did get hands free for the phone.  

Your Child

Tips for Preventing Sports Injuries

1:30

The school year is about to wind down and it won’t be long before many kids will be signing up for summer sports programs.

If you’re child loves sports, there’s not a season where he or she can’t find one to participate in. Sports often help children stay in better physical shape, feel good about them selves and with team sports, enjoy social interaction and competition.

However, all sports have a certain amount of risks associated with them - some more than others. The more contact the sport provides, the greater the risk for a traumatic injury. Fortunately, traumatic injuries are rare and most sport injuries to young athletes are due to overuse.

The most common sport-related injuries are sprains (ligament injuries) , stress fractures( bone injuries)  and strains (muscle injuries).Since children’s bodies are still developing, any tenderness over a bone should be evaluated further by a medical provider even if there is minimal swelling or limitation in motion.

The American Academy of Pediatrics offers these tips to help reduce serious injuries in younger athletes:

•       Time off. Plan to have at least 1 day off per week from a particular sport to allow the body to recover. 

•       Wear the right gear.  Players should wear appropriate and properly fit protective equipment such as pads (neck, shoulder, elbow, chest, knee, shin), helmets, mouthpieces, face guards, protective cups, and/or eyewear. Young athletes should not assume that protective gear will always protect them when performing more dangerous or risky activities.

•       Strengthen muscles. Conditioning exercises during practice strengthens muscles used in play. 

•       Increase flexibility. Stretching exercises before and after games or practice can increase flexibility. Stretching should also be incorporated into a daily fitness plan.

•       Use the proper technique. This should be reinforced during the playing season. 

•       Take breaks. Rest periods during practice and games can reduce injuries and prevent heat illness.  

•       Play safe. Strict rules against headfirst sliding (baseball and softball), and spearing (football) should be enforced. 

•       Stop the activity if there is pain.

•       Avoid heat injury by drinking plenty of fluids before, during and after exercise or play; decrease or stop practices or competitions during high heat/humidity periods; wear light clothing. 

While physical injuries are easier to see, sports-related emotional stress can also cause problems for some children. The pressure to win at all costs can add a lot of emotional stress to children who are more interested in playing than always being first.

Not every team is going to win every game, and there will be times when kids involved in more singular sports won’t have a good day. It happens to everyone at some time or another; ask any pro athlete. Young athletes should be judged on effort, sportsmanship and hard work. They should be rewarded for trying hard and for improving their skills rather than punished or criticized for losing a game or competition.  The main goal should be to have fun and learn lifelong physical activity skills.

There are numerous sports that children can engage in and each one offers its own benefits. As parents, it’s important to encourage our children and keep them as healthy as possible.

Source: http://www.healthychildren.org/English/news/Pages/Tips-for-Sports-Injury-Prevention.aspx

Daily Dose

Food Allergies at Halloween

1:30 to read

Halloween is just around the corner and for children with food allergies or sensitivities it is sometimes challenging to go trick or treating.  In the United States 1 in 13 children has a food allergy and for some children even the tiniest bit of their allergen can cause a severe reaction!!

So…have you heard about the Teal Pumpkin Project? It was introduced several years ago to enable children with food allergies to enjoy a fun and safe trick or treating experience….with no fear of being exposed to allergens.  

Nuts, milk, soy, wheat and egg are a few of the most common allergens in children  and adults). So many Halloween candies may contain many of these ingredients, and many of the miniature versions of popular candy that is given out on Halloween may not be labelled as to their ingredients. At times the “snack” size treat may even contain a different ingredient than the usual size candy bar.  Even with diligence it may be difficult for parents to determine if the candy in question is safe.

The Teal Pumpkin Project promotes having non-food treats available for children with food allergies. By putting a teal colored pumpkin on your front porch along with the traditional pumpkins and jack o lanterns, you let families know that you have special treats for a food allergic child, or for any child where candy may present a problem. In this way trick-or-treating is inclusive for everyone and the teal pumpkin ( or a poster with a teal pumpkin ) is an easy way for kids and parents to spot the houses that are participating.

Children love to get stickers, glow sticks, pencils, chalk and small toys are all suitable options for kids who have food allergies or intolerances, or for any child who prefers not to have candy. Kids get so much candy you may be the hit of the block by having a different basket for them to choose from.

Remember, if you are getting a food item for another child in your family to make sure that all candy has been unopened and to avoid choking hazards (like nuts and popcorn) for younger children

Be safe, have fun and look for a teal pumpkin….I am going to go buy some spray paint to turn one of my orange pumpkins into blue!!!  Fun project for a family and neighborhood to do together - a block of teal pumpkins!

 

Daily Dose

Summertime Can Mean Snakebites

1:15 to read

Due to wet weather, snakes are being oushed out into the open. What does it mean? There is a higher risk of being bitten by a snake. News reports have families on alert: snakes are being pushed out into the open.  More snakes mean the potential for more snakebites.  I have never treated a patient with a snakebite and thought they were quite uncommon. Unfortunately, a rattlesnake bit a friend of mine (they are out of the hospital and doing well) so upon review I have learned a lot more about venomous snakebites.

There are actually over 45,000 snakebites reported in the U.S. each year. The majority of these are due to non-poisonous snakes and often requires little or no treatment. The days of the old Cowboy movies showing rope tourniquets being applied to the area of the bite and the cutting and “sucking” of the venom are over! Don’t start practicing “movie medicine” if you find yourself dealing with a snakebite. There are about 8,000 venomous snakebites reported each year. Fortunately, with these large numbers and the advent of anti-venom, only six to eight people die each year secondary to a venomous snakebite. Unfortunately, due to their smaller size, children do not handle snakebites as well as adults, and the fatality rate is higher in children.

In the U.S. 99% of poisonous snakebites are by the subfamily pit viper, which includes rattlesnakes, copperheads and cottonmouths (YUCK). The other species of poisonous snake found in the U.S. is the coral snake. I am not going to detail the specific treatment for each type of bite, but if a snake bites your child the first thing to do is to determine if it was a poisonous snake. Non-poisonous snakebites cause minimal pain, no swelling and really only require local wound care with irrigation and antibacterial soap. If the bite is thought to be from a poisonous snake the child should be transported to the nearest hospital. Do not put a tourniquet around the bite, apply ice or suction the area of the bite as these are all thought to cause more tissue damage than benefit.

Pit viper bites typically cause symptoms of swelling, bruising and progression within minutes of the bite. Children typically have more severe symptoms with nausea, vomiting, sweating, muscle weakness and clotting abnormalities, all of which are a medical emergency. Anti-venom should be delivered within four hours of the bite and will be given until improvement in systemic symptoms is achieved. All of this is done in the ICU setting. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

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