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Your Baby

Half of U.S. Parents Using Unsafe Bedding for Infants

2:00

Parents are getting better about using loose bedding and leaving soft objects in their baby’s bed, but about half of U.S. infants are still sleeping with potentially hazardous bedding according to a new study.

Blankets, quilts and pillows can obstruct an infant’s airway and pose a suffocation risk according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).  This type of bedding is a recognized risk factor for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

The researchers investigated bedding use from 1993 to 2010 from the National Infant Sleep Position study.

They found that from 1993 to 2010, bedding use declined, but remained a common practice. The rate of bedding use averaged nearly 86 percent in 1993-1995, and declined to 55 percent in 2008-2010. Prevalence was highest for infants of teen mothers (83.5 percent) and lowest for infants born at term (55.6 percent). Researchers also found that bedding use was highest among infants who were sleeping in adult beds, placed to sleep on their sides, or shared a sleep surface.

AAP recommends that the best place for a baby to sleep is in the same room as his or her parents and always in a crib, not in the same bed. The crib should be free from toys, soft bedding, blankets, and pillows.

Other safe sleep practices are:

•       Place your baby on a firm mattress, covered by a fitted sheet that meets current safety standards. For more about crib safety standards, visit the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s Web site at http://www.cpsc.gov.

•       Place the crib in an area that is always smoke-free.

•       Don’t place babies to sleep on adult beds, chairs, sofas, waterbeds, pillows, or cushions.

•       Toys and other soft bedding, including fluffy blankets, comforters, pillows, stuffed animals, bumper pads, and wedges should not be placed in the crib with the baby. Loose bedding, such as sheets and blankets, should not be used as these items can impair the infant’s ability to breathe if they are close to his face. Sleep clothing, such as sleepers, sleep sacks, and wearable blankets are better alternatives to blankets.

•       Place babies to sleep on their backs to reduce the risk of SIDS. Side sleeping is not as safe as back sleeping and is not advised. Babies sleep comfortably on their backs, and no special equipment or extra money is needed.

•       “Tummy time” is playtime when infants are awake and placed on their tummies while someone is watching them. Have tummy time to allow babies to develop normally.

•       Remove mobiles when your baby is able to sit up.

Study authors conclude that while the numbers have improved significantly, infants are still being put to bed in an unsafe sleeping environment; about half still sleep with blankets, quilts, pillows, and other hazardous items.

It’s not unusual that many parents may not be aware of the dangers of blankets, pillows and quilts in a baby’s bed. Lots of people were raised with all these items in the bed, but that was also before scientists began to understand SIDS better and the possible causes. True, many babies did fine before these alerts and safety suggestions became more popular but a lot of children also died – we just didn’t know why.  Parents today are able to access better infant safety information than their own parents.

The study, “Trends in Infant Bedding Use: National Infant Sleep Position Study 1993-2010” was published in the January issue of the journal Pediatrics.

Source: http://www.healthychildren.org/English/News/Pages/Study-Shows-One-Half-of-US-Infants-Sleep-in-Potentially-Hazardous-Bedding.aspx

Parenting

Samsung Recalls I Million Galaxy Note 7 Smartphones

1:00

According to the Pew Research Center, 9 out of 10 Americans own a cell phone. That includes adults, teens and children. If you or a family member owns a Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphone, you need to stop using it and contact your wireless carrier or a Samsung retail outlet.

Samsung issued a warning about a week ago warning U.S. consumers to stop using the new Galaxy Note 7 smartphones.

Today, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) announced a recall of about 1 million of the smart-phones because the lithium-ion battery in the Galaxy Note7 smartphones can overheat and catch fire, posing a serious burn hazard to consumers.

Samsung has received 92 reports of the batteries overheating in the U.S., including 26 reports of burns and 55 of property damage from fires in cars and a garage, the agency said.

This is “such a serious fire hazard I urge all consumers to take advantage of this recall right away,” Elliot Kaye, chairman of the CPSC told a news conference late Thursday. 

This recall involves the Samsung Galaxy Note7 smartphone sold before September 15, 2016.  The recalled devices have a 5.7 inch screen and were sold in the following colors:  black onyx, blue coral, gold platinum and silver titanium with a matching stylus. Samsung is printed on the top front of the phone and Galaxy Note7 is printed on the back of the phone. 

To determine if your phone has been recalled, locate the IMEI number on the back of the phone or the packaging, and enter the IMEI number into the online registration site www.samsung.com or call Samsung toll-free at 844-365-6197.

The smartphones were sold at wireless carriers and electronic stores nationwide, including AT&T, Best Buy, Sprint, T-Mobile, US Cellular, Verizon stores and online at www.samsung.com and other websites from August 2016 through September 2016 for between $850 and $890.

You can find a list of the wireless and retailer phone numbers and websites at http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2016/Samsung-Recalls-Galaxy-Note7-Smartphones/

 

 

 

Daily Dose

Summer Means Head Lacerations

Parents are often frantic (as we all can be) when their child falls and you see blood coming from the head and face.Last weekend I had several phone calls about head lacerations. Summer is the season for accidents and it seems the weekends are always the busiest.

Parents are often frantic (as we all can be) when their child falls and you see blood coming from the head and face. Luckily, in most cases there is more blood than one would expect for the size of the injury, as the head is well vascularized and therefore even a small laceration will cause a lot of bleeding. The first thing to do is to get the child calmed down (and you too) and try and wash the area to really get an idea as to how large the laceration is. The patient who called could not get her child to let her look at her head (which showed that her child was okay if she could put up that much of a fight) so we had the idea of taking her toddler to the shower with the mother and to wash off there. That worked wonderfully and by then both mother and child had calmed down. Once you can see the cut, try to establish how deep and wide it is, and then see if you can stop the bleeding with pressure to the cut. If it is a scalp wound and you can stop the bleeding and it is not too deep I often do not put a child through stitches as their hair will cover the scar. That is the antithesis to a facial laceration when we are all concerned about cosmetic appearance and even a smaller cut might get one or two stitches in order to have the best cosmetic result. If in doubt, take your child to the doctor or run them by your pediatrician's house (that works great for me on weekends) in order to decide if stitches are needed. Some clean cuts may be closed with a wonderful product called "Dermabond" which is almost like "super glue" for skin. Do NOT use super glue which one of my own children thought about using for an injury while they were at college. Thank goodness they called home first! Just remember that a lot of blood does not always mean a huge injury. That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Your Toddler

Anchor It!

1:45

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has launched “Anchor It”, a national public education campaign, to help make people aware of the dangers that free-standing furniture and TVs present, particularly to children.

The annual number of children injured or killed from furniture and TV tip-overs is astounding.

According to CPSC data, unstable and unsecured TVs and large pieces of furniture kill a child every two weeks, on average, in tip-over incidents that are easily preventable.  CPSC also reported that 38,000 Americans go to emergency rooms each year with injuries related to tip-overs of top-heavy furniture or televisions placed on furniture, instead of a TV stand.  Two-thirds of those injuries involved children younger than 5.  Additionally, between 2000 and 2013, 84 percent of the 430 deaths reported to CPSC involved children younger than 10.

A January 2015 CPSC report found that a television tipping over from an average size dresser falls with thousands of pounds of force. 

The impact of a falling TV is like being caught between two NFL linemen colliding at full-speed—10 times. 

“Every 24 minutes in the U.S. a child goes to the emergency room because of a tip-over incident involving furniture or a TV,” said CPSC Commissioners Marietta Robinson and Joseph Mohorovic. “We must take action now. CPSC’s new ‘Anchor It!’ campaign is a call to action for parents and caregivers to ‘get on top of it, before they do.’ If we can prevent one more death, it will be worth it.”

Cards and posters are being distributed parents and caregivers of toddlers at daycare centers and preschools. A list of safety steps parents and caregivers can take are printed on the handouts. They are:

·      Buy and install low-cost anchoring devices to prevent TVs, dressers, bookcases or other furniture from tipping.

·      Avoid leaving items, such as remote controls and toys, in places where kids might be tempted to climb up to reach for them.

·      Store heavier items on lower shelves or in lower drawers.

·      Place TVs on a sturdy, low base and push them as far back as possible, particularly if anchoring is not possible.

·      If purchasing a new TV, consider recycling older ones not currently used. If moving the older TV to another room, be sure it is anchored properly to the wall.

The “Anchor It” campaign’s website (www.Anchorit.gov) shows you how to anchor furniture and television sets properly, with easy to follow instructions. Keep your little one safe and Anchor It!

 

Parenting

Health Official: Zika Outbreaks Likely in U.S.

2:00

The United States can expect to see outbreaks of the Zika virus says Dr.Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

While the U.S. has already seen more than 350 cases of people who were infected abroad and returned to the country, there haven’t been any recorded cases of someone infected within its borders. But those days may be limited, said Fauci.

"It is likely we will have what is called a local outbreak," he said on Fox News Sunday with Chris Wallace.

Since being detected in Brazil last year, the virus has spread through the Americas. It has been linked to thousands of cases of microcephaly, a typically rare birth defect marked by unusually small head size, which often indicates poor brain development. The World Health Organization declared a global health emergency in February.

Zika, which is spread by mosquitoes and through sexual contact, can give adults the paralyzing Guillain-Barre syndrome. The Aedes aegypti mosquito, which primarily transmits disease, is already present in about 30 U.S. states.

While Fauci does expect someone to be bitten by the mosquito here in the States, he does not expect a large number of people to become ill.

"It would not be surprising at all - if not likely - that we're going to see a bit of that," he said. "We're talking about scores of cases, dozens of cases, at most."

He also raised the prospect that other neurological ailments could be eventually linked to Zika, which he called "disturbing."

"There are only individual case reports of significant neurological damage to people not just the fetuses but an adult that would get infected. Things that they call meningoencephalitis, which is an inflammation of the brain and the covering around the brain, spinal cord damage due to what we call myelitis," he said. "So far they look unusual, but at least we've seen them and that's concerning."

Fauci has pressed the administration’s case for budgeting $1.9 billion dollars in emergency funds to fight the virus.

"We have to act now," he said. "I can't wait to start developing a vaccine."

Still, Fauci refrained from recommending that U.S. women avoid becoming pregnant because of fear of giving birth to a baby with microcephaly.

"Right now in the United States they should not be that concerned. We do not have local outbreaks," he said.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), no vaccine currently exists to prevent Zika virus disease. The mosquito that carries the Zika virus mostly bites in the daytime.

The CDC recommends following typical mosquito bite preventions such as:

•       Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants.

•       Stay in places with air conditioning and window and door screens to keep mosquitoes outside.

•       Sleep under a mosquito bed net if you are overseas or outside and are not able to protect yourself from mosquito bites.

•       Use Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-registered insect repellents with one of the following active ingredients: DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus, or para-menthane-diol. Choosing an EPA-registered repellent ensures the EPA has evaluated the product for effectiveness. When used as directed, EPA-registered insect repellents are proven safe and effective, even for pregnant and breast-feeding women.

◦       Always follow the product label instructions.

◦       Reapply insect repellent as directed.

◦       Do not spray repellent on the skin under clothing.

◦       If you are also using sunscreen, apply sunscreen before applying insect repellent.

•       To protect your child from mosquito bites:

◦       Do not use insect repellent on babies younger than 2 months old.

◦       Do not use products containing oil of lemon eucalyptus or para-menthane-diol on children younger than 3 years old.

◦       Dress your child in clothing that covers arms and legs.

◦       Cover crib, stroller, and baby carrier with mosquito netting.

◦       Do not apply insect repellent onto a child’s hands, eyes, mouth, and cut or irritated skin.

◦       Adults: Spray insect repellent onto your hands and then apply to a child’s face.

•       Treat clothing and gear with permethrin or purchase permethrin-treated items.

◦       Treated clothing remains protective after multiple washings. See product information to learn how long the protection will last.

◦       If treating items yourself, follow the product instructions carefully.

◦        Do NOT use permethrin products directly on skin. They are intended to treat clothing.

Story sources: Diane Bartz, http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-zika-usa-idUSKCN0XE0UV

http://www.cdc.gov/zika/prevention/

Your Toddler

Bathroom Safety Tips

1:45

While most of us may not think of a bathroom as a dangerous place, it often is where home injuries occur. From infants to the elderly, bathrooms are notorious for being places one can slip and fall, drown, be scalded and even electrocuted.

Young children are particularly vulnerable to accidents in the bathroom. The simplest way to avoid bathroom injuries is to make sure that an adult is always with an infant, toddler or young child when he or she is in the room. This may mean installing a latch on the door at adult height so the child can't get into the bathroom when you aren't around. Also, be sure any lock on the door can be unlocked from the outside, just in case your child locks him or herself in.

Here are 5 tips to help prevent bathroom injuries to young children:

1      Supervision: Children can drown in only a few inches of water, so never leave a young child alone in the bath, even for a moment. If you can't ignore the doorbell or the phone, wrap your child in a towel and take him along when you go to answer them. Bath seats and rings are meant to be bathing aids and will not prevent drowning if the child is left unattended. Never leave water in the bathtub when it is not in use. It's also important to have anything and everything you think you'll need within arm's reach before getting down to business. So that you don’t have to step away from your child, have items such as soap and shampoo, washcloths, a towel or two, moisturizer for infants, diapering supplies and a change of clothes within reach.

2      Slips and falls: Install no-slip strips on the bottom of the bathtub. Put a cushioned cover over the water faucet so your child won't be hurt if he bumps his head against it. Get in the habit of closing the lid of the toilet, and get a toilet lid lock. A curious toddler who tries to play in the water can lose his balance and fall in. Potty-training is a time when parents should be in the bathroom to make sure curious toddlers don’t decide to play with the toilet water.

3      Water temperature: To prevent scalding, adjust your water heater so the hottest temperature at the faucet is no more than 120 degrees Fahrenheit (48.9 degrees Celsius). Test the water with your wrist or elbow to check that it feels warm, not hot. When your child is old enough to turn the faucets, teach him to start the cold water before the hot.

4      Medicine and toiletry storage: Keep all medicines in containers with safety caps. Remember, however, that these caps are child-resistant, not childproof, so store all medicines and cosmetics high and out of reach in a locked cabinet. Don't keep toothpaste, soaps, shampoos, and other frequently used items in the same cabinet. Instead, store them in a hard-to-reach cabinet equipped with a safety latch or locks.

5      Electric appliances: If you use electrical appliances in the bathroom, particularly hair dryers and razors, be sure to unplug them and store them in a cabinet with a safety lock when they aren't in use. It is better to use them in another room where there is no water. An electrician can install special bathroom wall sockets (ground-fault circuit interrupters) that can lessen the likelihood of electrical injury when an appliance falls into the sink or bathwater.

Every year, young children are injured or die in bathrooms. Many families never think to lock a bathroom door when no one is in it, but making sure there is a lock in place and is used may prevent an unnecessary tragedy. 

Story source: https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/bathing-skin-care/Pages/Preparing-Your-Bathing-Area.aspx

 

Your Baby

Should Pregnant Women Buckle-Up?

2.00 to read

Should expectant mothers buckle up and make sure the air bag is turned on before driving or riding in a car?  Absolutely say researchers in a recent study by the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC.

Many women are concerned that, in case of an accident, seat belts and /or air bags might harm their unborn child, but according to the study, expectant mothers who are not restrained during a car crash are more likely to lose the pregnancy than those who are.

According to the March of Dimes, nearly 170,000 pregnant women are involved in a motor vehicle accident each year.

"One thing we're always concerned about is (educating) patients on seatbelt use," said Dr. Haywood Brown, the chair of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Duke University Medical Center and senior author of the new study.

"Nonetheless, like all individuals, some choose and some do not choose to wear their seatbelt," he added.

For the study, Brown and his colleagues searched through the trauma registry at Duke University Hospital. They found 126 cases of women in their 2nd and 3rd trimesters that had been in a car crash and were cared for at the hospital between 1994 and 2010.

What they discovered was that 86 mothers were wearing a seat belt when the crash occurred. Of that group, 3.5 percent or (3) fetuses died.

12 mothers were not wearing a seat belt. Of the unrestrained group, 25 percent or (3) fetuses died. 

"The bottom line is, you've got to wear your restraint because it decreases the risk not only for your injuries but injury to your child," Brown told Reuters Health.

Where should the seat belt be placed? The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends that the seat belt be fitted low across the hipbones and below the belly.

The March of Dimes offers more seat belt and air bag guidelines for pregnant women:

  • Always wear both the lap and shoulder belt.
  • Never place the lap belt across your belly.
  • Rest the shoulder belt between your breasts and off to the side of your belly.
  • Never place the shoulder belt under your arm.
  • If possible, adjust the shoulder belt height to fit you correctly.
  • Make sure the seat belt fits snugly.
  • Driving can be tiring for anyone. Try to limit driving to no more than 5-6 hours per day.
  • Never turn off the air bags if your car has them. Instead, tilt your car seat and move it as far as possible from the dashboard or steering wheel.
  • If you are in a crash, get treatment right away to protect yourself and your baby.
  • Call your health provider at once if you have contractions, pain in your belly, or blood or fluid leaking from your vagina.

Researchers found that first time mothers were the least likely to use a seat belt. Brown noted it's possible that the habit of buckling in children might prompt mothers to put on their own seatbelt.

Mothers-to-be also worry about airbags and whether they could harm the fetus if a crash causes deployment.

In the study, airbags came out in 17 of the accidents, and in those cases the mother was more likely to experience the placenta separating from the uterus - a condition that can be fatal for the mother or the fetus.

Another researcher, not involved in the study, suggested to Reuters Health that the severity of the accidents, and not the airbags, might have been the cause of the serious consequences.

Brown said some women will disarm the airbag for fear that it will damage the baby in case of a crash, but "it's not the smart thing to do because it will save your life if the airbag comes out."

A study, from researchers in Washington State, found that airbags did not increase the risk of most pregnancy-related injuries.

No one likes to think about the damage a car accident can cause, but the reality is that seat belts and air bags save lives. Mothers-to-be, like everyone else, should use theirs when driving or riding in a car. You may need to make some adjustments so that your seat belt fits safely and correctly and the air bag is not right up next to your stomach, but taking those few extra steps could mean the difference between life and death.

Sources: Kerry Grens, http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/03/08/us-buckle-up-during-pregnancy-idUSBRE92710P20130308

http://www.marchofdimes.com/pregnancy/stayingsafe_seatbelts.html

Daily Dose

Swim Lessons Can Reduce Risk of Drowning

1:15 to read

Now that hot weather is with all of us, the issue of childhood drowning is an ever-present concern. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that after the age of five years, all children be taught to swim. The AAP does not recommend for or against swimming lessons as a measure to prevent drowning in children younger than five years. Between 2000 and 2005, 6,900 children died from non-boating accidental drowning. The rate of drowning was almost four times higher for children one to two years of age, and twice as high for those younger than five.

An article in Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine looked at the association between swimming lessons and risk of drowning specifically in the one to four year old age groups. Previous concerns had been raised about the potential for swimming lessons to increase the risk for drowning in younger children. This study provided good news that kids aged one to four who have taken formal swimming lessons have an 88% less risk of drowning. Researchers found that only three percent of the children who had drowned had taken swimming lessons. So with this news, it might be prudent to start swimming lessons at a younger age than previously thought.

But swimming lessons alone will not prevent drowning and even in this study, many of the older children who drowned were noted to have been proficient swimmers. It is still important to have other drowning prevention strategies in place including pool fencing (some parents with pools feel like their child will not be able to unlock a door and head to the pool and do not have a fence in place, and I totally disagree with that argument), constant and age appropriate adult supervision and training in CPR. Children are amazing at finding ways to unlock doors, and windows that lead outside and no parent can know where their child is for every minute of the day. If you have a pool and a child is missing always check the pool first, as a child can quietly slip into the water and lose consciousness in as little as two minutes and drown in five minutes.

That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow.

Your Child

Recall: MZB Children’s Watches Due to Rash, Chemical Burns

1:00

They are cute, keep time and appeal to children who want to own a watch. But, these watches have a defect that can expose children to serious skin irritations including chemical burns.

Nearly two million MZB Children’s “Light Up” Watches have been recalled because the case-back of the watch can detach and expose the interior to water posing a risk of skin irritation, redness, rashes or chemical burns.

This recall involves 303 styles of “Light Up” watches that are identified by style number. A complete list of the serial numbers is listed on the firm’s website http://www.regcen.com. The watches have a flexible plastic wristband sold in multiple colors including pink, pink with white snowflakes, green, blue and navy blue. “MZB” and the style number are printed on the case-back of the watches.

The firm has received 11 reports of skin irritations or chemical burns. Six of these consumers have required medical treatment.

The watches were sold at Kmart, Kohl’s, Walmart and other retailers nationwide from October 2012 through June 2015 for between $5 and $20.

Consumers should immediately take the recalled watches away from children and contact MZB for a refund.

MZB can be reached by calling their toll free number at (888) 770-7085 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at www.mzb.com and click on Product Safety Notice tab at the top of the homepage for more information.

Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2015/MZB-Recalls-Childrens-Watches/

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