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Your Child

Zip Line Injuries Soaring

2:00

There’s definitely something thrilling about standing high above the ground, hooking oneself onto a pulley and launching off the edge of safety, then soaring through the air on a steel cable. It’s called zip lining.

A new study finds, as the adventure sport’s popularity has increased, so have associated injuries requiring treatment at an emergency room.

Researchers found the injury rate from zip lines rose by more than 50 percent between 2009 and 2012, with kids 9 and under accounting for 45 percent of the injuries.

"One of the things that really struck us about this study is how serious the injuries were. Almost 50 percent of them were fractures or broken bones, and over 10 percent actually had to be admitted to the hospital," said Tracy Mehan of Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, who led the study.

"These are much higher and more serious injuries than we see with a lot of studies, and it shows us that this activity is much more like an adventure sport," Mehan told NBC News.

Mehan and her team looked at a national database of emergency room visits. They found that since 1997, close to 17,000 people have been injured badly enough from zip line activities to need care from an emergency room.

There were not enough annual cases until 2009 — when zip lines really began to be popular — to put a good, solid rate on the number of injuries.

"Seventy percent of them were in the last four years, which shows us that this is a growing trend," Mehan said. "In fact, in 2012 alone, there were over 3,600 injuries, which was about 10 a day."

What was once an adventure only found in a remote part of the world has become big business in rural areas and suburbs throughout the country.  If you have the space, you can even buy a kit and assemble a zip line in your own backyard.  What could possibly go wrong?

"In 2001 there were about 10 commercial zip line outfits in the United States," Mehan said. "By 2012 this had grown to over 200. And when you add in all of the publicly accessible zip lines that you see now, it's over 13,000."

Most of the injuries happened when people fell off or crashed into something like a tree or a zip line structure.

"The injuries really happen when you fell off the zip line from a high height, or when you went careening into a tree at a high speed or a support structure and had a collision. Those types of injuries are very serious," she said.

"The most common injury by far that we see are broken bones. That was almost 50 percent of our injuries. Other injuries can be bruises, sprains and strains, or concussions."

Head injuries account for 7 percent of the hospital visits says Mehan, and wearing a helmet doesn’t guarantee your head will be protected. A fall from a short height can damage the head and neck, even with a helmet.

While zip line popularity may be increasing, safety standards are pretty much non- existent says Mehan.

"I think a lot of families assume that if there is a zip line out there, that it is following industry safety standards and it's being kept up and maintained in a way that is safe, but that's not always the case," she said.

"Not a lot of states actually have standards in place. Some do, some don't, and even among those that do, it can even vary among jurisdiction," she added.

"We would like to see one universal set of safety standards adopted by each state."

When 12-year-old, Bonnie Sanders Burney, fell to her death in a zip line accident in North Carolina this year, the state’s General Assembly quickly passed a law requiring research for possible regulations. While some states have codified regulations, others allow operators of zip lines and high ropes courses to self-regulate.

Mehan and her team hope the information from this study will spur a tougher look at creating a national code of safety regulations pertaining to zip lines.

Source: Maggie Fox and Erika Edwards, http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/zipline-injuries-soar-study-finds-n438876

 

 

 

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July 4th

Have a safe & fun July 4th!

Daily Dose

Stranger Danger

1.30 to read

We had a question via our iPhone App from an aunt who wanted to talk to her twin 4 year old nephews about “stranger danger”. Unfortunately, this topic has been in the news quite frequently lately with child abduction cases being reported all around the country. The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children has numerous resources for educating children about safety.  Interestingly, most perpetrators are not actually strangers, but are often someone the parents or another adult knows and may have been around the child on occasion. So, it seems that “stranger danger” may not be the appropriate term to use when teaching our children, especially younger, children about safety. It is important that the conversation about safety begins with children at young ages. It is often easier to use teachable moments to begin the conversation with young children.  Talk to your child about “safe” strangers, as it is hard for a child to understand why you are talking to grocery store clerks, or people on the playground in the park, and yet they are strangers. It may be best to teach a child to watch out for dangerous behaviors from adults, rather than saying “never talk to strangers”.  Talk about adults who might approach them for directions, or to find a missing pet and role play as to what they should  do. At the same time, teach them that they can turn to “strangers” such a store clerks or mothers with children for help if they are scared. While talking about this subject use a calm reassuring manner.  You do not want to make your child “too” anxious as most people they will meet are not dangerous, and children do need to interact and trust numerous people around them that they will meet in  different situations. Another good way to discuss the issue of “stranger danger” is by reading books to young children that deal with the issue. Several good books that I like are:  The Berenstein Bears Learn About Strangers; A Stranger in the Park; I  Can Play it Safe.  There are many other books out there too, so head to your library  or your local bookstore to get some more recommendations. The librarians are often helpful with finding “age appropriate” books.  Lastly, this is not a one time conversation, but should be discussed at different ages and stages of your child’s That's your daily dose.  We'll chat again tomorrow.

Your Child

Family Dog Responsible for Most Bite Injuries

2:00

Is your child more likely to be bitten by the family dog or someone else’s dog? Many parents might assume that most dog attacks occur from either strays or another’s dog because they feel like know their own pet’s behavior.

A new study points out that even man’s best friend can turn on a child or adult under the right circumstances.

The recently published study, in the Journal of Pediatric Surgery, demonstrated that more than 50 percent of the dog-bite injuries treated at Phoenix Children's Hospital came from dogs belonging to an immediate family member.

The study noted that many times, because a pet is almost considered a family member, parents of young children are too relaxed about the interactions between their children and the family dog, presenting a false sense of safety.

 "More than 60 percent of the injuries we studied required an operation," said lead author Dr. Erin Garvey, a surgical resident at Mayo Clinic "While the majority of patients were able to go home the next day, the psychological effects of being bitten by a dog also need to be taken into account."

The retrospective study looked at a 74-month period between 2007 and 2013 in which there were 670 dog-bite injuries treated at Phoenix Children's Hospital. Of those, 282 were severe enough to require evaluation by the trauma team or transportation by ambulance. Characteristics of the most common injuries included:

·      Both genders were affected (55 percent male)

·      The most common patient age was 5 years, but spanned from 2 months to 17 years

·      28 dog breeds were identified; the most common dog was pit bull

·      More than 50 percent of the dogs belonged to the patient's immediate family

·      The most common injuries were lacerations (often to the face), but there were also a number of fractures and critical injuries such as severe neck and genital trauma

 “The next step is to find out what type of education is needed and for whom - the parents, owners of the dogs and even the kids themselves," explains Dr. Garvey.

The Injury Prevention Center at Phoenix Children's Hospital recommends that families with a dog in the house follow the safety tips below:

·      Never leave infants or young children alone with a dog, including the family dog.

·      Make sure all dogs in the home are neutered or spayed.

·      Take time to train and socialize your dogs.

·      Keep dogs mentally stimulated by walking and exercising them.

·      Teach children appropriate ways to interact with animals.

A good rule of thumb is to learn how to read your dog’s body language. There are signs a dog will give when they are uncomfortable or are feeling threatened:

·      Tensed body

·      Stiff tail

·      Pulled back head and/or ears

·      Furrowed brow

·      Eyes rolled so the whites are visible

·      Yawning

·      Flicking tongue

·      Intense stare

·      Backing away

Many of the dog’s body signals listed above are the opposite of how humans display fear or irritation, and some are natural body occurrences that have nothing to do with how we react to being threatened – such as yawning, For canines, however, all of the above means -  back-off.

One more important note, when putting space between yourself and a dog that might bite, never turn your back on him and run away. A dog's natural instinct will be to chase you.

Sources: Jim McVeigh. http://www.tri-cityherald.com/2015/05/27/3579702_dog-bite-study-shows-familiarity.html?rh=1

http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/dogs/tips/avoid_dog_bites.html

 

 

Daily Dose

Food Allergies at Halloween

1:30 to read

Halloween is just around the corner and for children with food allergies or sensitivities it is sometimes challenging to go trick or treating.  In the United States 1 in 13 children has a food allergy and for some children even the tiniest bit of their allergen can cause a severe reaction!!

So…have you heard about the Teal Pumpkin Project? It was introduced several years ago to enable children with food allergies to enjoy a fun and safe trick or treating experience….with no fear of being exposed to allergens.  

Nuts, milk, soy, wheat and egg are a few of the most common allergens in children  and adults). So many Halloween candies may contain many of these ingredients, and many of the miniature versions of popular candy that is given out on Halloween may not be labelled as to their ingredients. At times the “snack” size treat may even contain a different ingredient than the usual size candy bar.  Even with diligence it may be difficult for parents to determine if the candy in question is safe.

The Teal Pumpkin Project promotes having non-food treats available for children with food allergies. By putting a teal colored pumpkin on your front porch along with the traditional pumpkins and jack o lanterns, you let families know that you have special treats for a food allergic child, or for any child where candy may present a problem. In this way trick-or-treating is inclusive for everyone and the teal pumpkin ( or a poster with a teal pumpkin ) is an easy way for kids and parents to spot the houses that are participating.

Children love to get stickers, glow sticks, pencils, chalk and small toys are all suitable options for kids who have food allergies or intolerances, or for any child who prefers not to have candy. Kids get so much candy you may be the hit of the block by having a different basket for them to choose from.

Remember, if you are getting a food item for another child in your family to make sure that all candy has been unopened and to avoid choking hazards (like nuts and popcorn) for younger children

Be safe, have fun and look for a teal pumpkin….I am going to go buy some spray paint to turn one of my orange pumpkins into blue!!!  Fun project for a family and neighborhood to do together - a block of teal pumpkins!

 

Daily Dose

Leaving Your Child Home Alone

1.00 to read

I get asked the questions a lot "At what age can I leave my child home alone?"  There is no simple answer but a progressibe one.

I tend to think most children are ready to spend 20-30 minutes alone at home between the ages of 10-11, but every child is different.  It depends on a number of things including how your child feels about being alone, the length of time, and if you and your child have discussed how to handle emergencies and getting a hold of you or a neighbor in case there is an emergency or even just a question that needs to be answered.  

Well, this topic brought up an interesting question, what do you do when you leave your child alone and there is not a home phone?  I have never even given that a thought as I am “old school” and still have that landline in my house. It just gives me a “good feeling” to know that it is there, even if it rarely rings. (although the kids know to call the home number as I typically turn off the cell as soon as I hit the door from work).   

More and more families have given up a home phone and I think this brings up so many different topics for discussion, but for starts how does your child call you when you leave them alone?  Or how do they call the trusty neighbor if they need something.  Do you get them a cell phone? Do you have to have an extra cell phone to have at home?  It seems to me that a home phone is important for just that reason. In case of an emergency, your child can pick up the phone and call for help, assistance or just a friendly voice. I don’t think they need a cell phone!  

Also, landlines are relatively inexpensive. Cell phones for 8,10, 11 year olds?  Sounds inappropriate and expensive.  Wouldn’t it be easier to keep a home phone so children can learn to answer a phone, use good phone manners, and when you are ready to let them stay at home by themselves for a few minutes, there is always a phone available. I don’t know, just seems easy solution to me.    

What do you think? I would love to hear from you!

 

Daily Dose

Remember the Rules of Boating Safety

A tragic boating accident in our area during a Boy Scout outing to the lake has reminded me and many other parents of the necessity of following safe boating rules. While summer is here many families may have the opportunity for a boating outing. The best time to discuss boating safety and rules with your children is prior to even going on a boat.

Then another review of boating safety, (I would include jet skis in this too) should happen just before launching the boat on the water. Children of all ages should be taught boating safety and there should never be assumptions that they have heard all of the rules before. With the excitement of the day, many children and adolescents need to be continuously reminded of safe boating rules to ensure an accident free experience. All children and adults should have a Coast Guard certified life preserver (personal flotation device, PDF) and children should wear them at all times. In my opinion, adults should too, and model behavior for the kids. Whistles

Your Child

Tips for Grandparents Caring for Grandkids

2:00

Summers often provide grandparents the opportunity to spend extra time with the grandkids. While parents continue their work schedule, grandpa and grandma lovingly spoil their little ones. Many grandparents are actually raising their grandkids or providing year-round part time care.

Grandparents are are more than just babysitters, they provide a unique generational connection.  Their stories and life experiences can provide a treasure trove of valuable links to the family’s past. Hard-earned wisdom can offer guidance when youngsters are searching for answers. They are unique.

If you’re a grandparent caring for your grandkids – God bless you! What a wonderful gift you are giving to your kids and their children. 

Now is a good time to educate yourself on the new medical discoveries made since you raised your own children by asking your grandchild's parents to share information.  The medical profession has learned a lot about having infants sleep safely on their backs and on safer over-the-counter medications for illnesses, as well as many other things. A child safety update can be enormously beneficial. 

It may have been a while since you’ve been in charge of a little one’s care; to help freshen up on child home safety, here is a list of safety recommendations by the American Academy of Pediatrics:

Nursery & Sleeping Area -

•       If you saved your own child's crib, stored in your attic or garage, per­haps awaiting the arrival of a grandchild someday, you should replace it with a new one. Guidelines for children's furniture and equipment have changed dramatically, and a crib that is more than a few years old will not meet today's safety standards. This is likely also true for other saved and aging furniture that could pose risks to children, such as an old playpen.

•       Buy a changing table, use your own bed, or even a towel on the floor to change the baby's diapers. As she gets a little older, and she becomes more likely to squirm, you may need a second person to help in changing her diaper.

•       Do not allow your grandchild to sleep in your bed.

•       Keep the diaper pail emptied.

Kitchen -

•       Put "kiddie locks" on the cabinets; to be extra safe, move unsafe cleansers and chemicals so they're completely out of reach.

•       Remove any dangling cords, such as those from the coffeepot or toaster.

•       Take extra precautions before giving your grandchild food prepared in microwave ovens. Microwaves can heat liquids and solids unevenly, and they may be mildly warm on the outside but very hot on the in­side.

Bathroom -

•       Store pills, inhalers, and other prescription or nonprescription medi­cations, as well as medical equipment, locked and out of the reach of your grandchild. Be especially vigilant that all medications of any kind are kept up and away from a child's reach and sight.

•       Put nonslip material in the bathtub to avoid dangerous falls.

•       If there are handles and bars in the bathtub for your own use, cover them with soft material if you are going to be bathing the baby there.

•       Never leave a child unattended in a tub or sink filled with water.

Baby Equipment Safety

•       Never leave your grandchild alone in a high chair or in an infant seat located in high places, such as a table or countertop.

•       Do not use baby walkers.

Toy Safety:

•       Buy new toys for your grandchild that has a variety of sounds, sights, and colors. Simple toys can be just as good. Remember, no matter how fancy the toys may be your own interac­tion and play with your grandchild are much more important.

•       Toys, CDs, and books should be age-appropriate and challenge chil­dren at their own developmental level.

•       Avoid toys with small parts that the baby could put into her mouth and swallow. Follow the recommendations on the package to find toys suitable for your grandchild's age.

•       Because toy boxes can be dangerous, keep them out of your home, or look for one without a top or lid.

Garage and Basements

•       Make sure that the automatic reversing mechanism on the garage door is operating.

•       Keep all garden chemicals and pesticides as well as tools in a locked cabinet and out of reach.

•       Make sure that freezers, refrigerator and washing machines are not accessible. 

These safety tips can help recharge your memory when it comes to caring for small children as well as offer some new ideas on making your home a safer place for them to visit.

Times have changed since your children were young. Your energy level may not be quite as high as it once was, so planning the day with rest breaks included can help you and the kids.

 While some things may have changed, love is still the universal ingredient that helps children thrive and grandparents have plenty of that!

Sources: http://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-home/Pages/A-Message-for-Grandparents-Keeping-Your-Grandchild-Safe-in-Your-Home.aspx

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/family-life/work-play/Pages/A-Message-for-Grandparents-Who-Provide-Childcare.aspx

 

 

Daily Dose

Pool Safety

1:15 to read

As you know, water safety is paramont this time of year so I want to make sure your children are safe this summer.  Drowning is the leading cause of death for children between the ages of 1- 4 and the second leading cause of unintentional death for children under the age of 14.  Over 390 children die each year in their own backyard pools...tragically drowning is typically a SILENT event.

The first thing all pools need is a at least 4 foot tall fence surrounding all 4 sides of the pool. Now is the time to make sure that not only is your pool fenced but that it also is “tuned up” after the winter. That means that the self latching gate is working, that all pool furniture and toys are  moved away from the fence in order that children cannot climb up and over a fence, and you might even add a pool alarm that goes off if anyone enters the pool without supervision. 

If you have a door from the house to the pool there should be an alarm on the door as well as having a fence around the pool…this ensures “layers of protection”..the more layers to keep your child away from an unsupervised pool the better!  Children are clever, fast and tenacious.

Now once you decide to enjoy a day poolside you need to have several things on hand which include a portable phone, a flotation ring or hook, and always an adult within arms reach of a toddler or young child who has not yet learned to swim.  If there are several “non swimmers” in the pool with only 1 adult,  it is best to put all of the children in an approved flotation device as well.  The adult who is supervising the pool should ideally know CPR. I think that all “pool owners” should take CPR.

The person in charge of watching a child or children in the pool need to be identified and vigilant. That means staying off a cell phone or any electronics that might be distracting. It is also not the time for adults to be partying and alcohol is discouraged.  

Most children over the age of 4 years are ready for swimming lessons, but the AAP does recognize that there are some younger children between 1 -4 years who may be ready for swimming lessons, especially those that are frequently around water ( home pool, lake , beach). Each child will develop at differently.  Even a young child who has had swim lessons should not be considered “drown-proof” and never be unsupervised.

Lastly, don’t forget the sunscreen and remember to re-apply frequently to both you and your child!

 

 

 

   

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