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Your Baby

Recall: Otteroo Baby Floats Due to Drowning Risks

1:00

Babies and young children can drown in less than 2 inches of water.  That’s why it is  vital that parents and caregivers never leave a baby or young child unattended while they are near or in water.

When bathing their infant, parents will sometimes attach a bath float to their child to help keep his or her head above water. While the float may offer some assistance, critics warn that the device can give parents a false sense of security that their child is protected from drowning.

Otteroo Corporation makes inflatable baby floats that are specifically designed for babies 8 weeks and up.

The company is recalling about 3000 units of their inflatable Baby Floats after receiving 54 reports of broken seems on the product. No injuries have been reported.

The Otteroo Inflatable Baby Float is an inflatable round ring made of clear and blue plastic material. It has two air chambers that fasten around a baby’s neck with a white buckle. The floats have a chin rest, two handles and two circular openings on the back of the ring to allow the device to expand as the child grows with age. There are three colorful balls that move freely around inside the ring.  The name “Otteroo” is imprinted on the top of the float in large, orange letters with an Otter logo.

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled inflatable baby floats and contact the firm to receive a free replacement.

The floats were sold online at Otteroo.com and Amazon.com and Zulily.com from January 2014 through July 2014 for about $35.

Consumers can contact Otteroo Corporation at (415) 236-5388 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. PT Monday through Friday or online www.otteroo.com and click on “Safety” at the bottom of the page for more information.

According to their website, Otteroo is offering a free replacement for those who purchased the product manufactured in 2014 (NO: 002013001).

Sources: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/Recall-Alerts/2015/Otteroo-Corp-Recalls-Inflatable-Baby-Floats/

http://otteroo.com/pages/safety-info

Parenting

Labor Day Safety Tips!

2:30

Traditionally, Labor Day is the fond farewell to summer and a welcomed hello to autumn. Lots of people will be on the roads, having backyard or park reunions, grilling, swimming and basically enjoying family and friends get-togethers.

To make this Labor Day a safe one, here are some tips that can help keep you from having to make a trip to the ER on this special weekend:

Road Safety.

-       Before you start out on a trip, make sure that your vehicle is in good condition, and see that any necessary maintenance is performed.

-       Just as adults and kids should always wear a seat belt, infants should always be properly secured in car seats.  

-       Be sure to follow all traffic laws while on the road, and use extra caution while driving in construction zones.

-       Be vigilant about paying attention to the road, and avoid distractions such as cell phones. Even just a momentary look away from the road can drastically increase your chances of a crash.

-       Be mindful of other vehicles on the road and remember to keep a safe distance between your vehicle and others. Keep in mind that semi-trucks, for example, require more time to come to a stop than cars do, and have large blind spots.

-       Keep an eye out for motorcyclists. Motorcycles are more difficult to see because they are smaller and can swiftly move in and out of traffic.

-       Even though you may have GPS, keep a map in the car and road flares in the trunk.

Food Safety. Picnics, barbeques, and neighborhood potlucks are plentiful and that means so is the chance of food-borne illness. To minimize the chance of cross-contamination:

-       Wash your hands before and after you touch raw meat.

-       Dry your hands on paper towels instead of cloth towels, and discard immediately. Refrigerate meat that’s waiting to hit the grill.

-       Never leave food that requires refrigeration (think potato salad, coleslaw or chicken salad) out in the sun. Instead, set the item the bowl is in on top of a pan filled with ice, and serve from a shaded area.

-       Return the item to the refrigerator as soon as guests have been served.

Boat Safety. Lots of folks will be heading to the lake for a family and/or friends boating adventure over the Labor Day weekend. Make it a safe one with these suggestions:

-       Have your boat in good mechanical condition and have all safety equipment on board such as personal flotation devices, an emergency kit and a first aid kit.

-       Stay away from restricted areas.

-       Make sure someone on land knows when you leave, about what time you’re expecting to return, where you’re headed and who all is on board.

-       Take a fully charged cell phone with you.

-       Everyone should have a life-vest on, including infants.

-       Maintain safe speeds and keep a lookout for hidden objects below the waterline

-       Maintain a 50-foot distance from other boats, swimmers, docks and the shore unless operating at an idle speed.

-       Install a marine-grade CO detector in your boat

-       Keep a flashlight and fresh batteries available.

-       Choose a designated driver before launching. Passengers that drink alcohol should drink in moderation.

-       Have plenty of water on board to avoid dehydration.

Pool and Water Safety. Pools and lakes are another place you’ll find plenty of people this Labor Day. That means lots of children will be in the water as well. It’s always best if someone knows CPR, if you don’t know it now – make a point of the family taking CPR classes together soon.

-       Appoint a “designated watcher” to monitor children during social gatherings at or near pools or water.

-       Have a fully charged cell phone with you. Call 911 immediately if a child is found unconscious in water.

-       Keep rescue equipment poolside or with you at the lake. Don’t wait for the paramedics to arrive because you will lose valuable life-saving seconds. Four to six minutes without oxygen can cause permanent brain damage or death.

-       Have a first-aid kit close by.

-       Maintain constant visual contact with children in a pool or lake or near a pool or lake. If a child is missing, check the water first; seconds count in preventing death or disability.

-       Never use flotation devices as a substitute for supervision. 

-       Don’t assume you’ll hear a child who’s in trouble in the water; child drowning is a silent death, with no splashing to alert anyone that the child is in trouble.

-       At public pools, use one that has a lifeguard. While not a substitute for parental or caretaker supervision, the more eyes available, the better.

Whether you’re splashing in a pool, enjoying the ultimate picnic or enjoying a ride on a boat, we want you to stay safe this Labor Day weekend. Remember: An accident is never planned. But keeping out safety tips in mind may help prevent one.

Story sources: http://www.cooneyconway.com/blog/road-safety-labor-day-weekend

https://www.safewise.com/blog/7-safety-tips-for-an-injury-free-labor-day/

http://www.nationalwatersafetymonth.org/water-safety-tips

Parenting

Hobby Lobby Recalls 43,000 Light-Up Spinner Toys

1:00

Hobby Lobby is recalling about 43,000 children’s battery-powered, light-up spinner toys sold in two themes: Easter and July 4th. The Easter-themed toys were sold in blue with a pink bunny on the dome and yellow with a yellow and orange chicken on the dome. The July 4th spinners are red with white stars painted on the blue dome. “Hobby Lobby” and item number 9130033 or 9130082 is printed on the spinner handle. Three LR44 coin cell batteries power the spinners.

The battery cover can detach and expose the small coin cell batteries, posing choking and ingestion hazards to young children.

Hobby Lobby has received one report of a 14-month-old child who ingested the battery.

Consumers should immediately take the recalled spinners away from children and return them to the nearest Hobby Lobby or Mardel store. Consumers with a receipt will receive a full refund and consumers without a receipt will receive a store credit.

The spinners were sold at Hobby Lobby and Mardel stores nationwide from February 2017 to April 2017 for about $5.

Consumers can contact Hobby Lobby Stores at 800-326-7931 between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or online at www.hobbylobby.com and click on the Recall tab for more information.

Story source: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/Hobby-Lobby-Recalls-Easter-and-July-4th-Light-Up-Spinner-Toys

Daily Dose

Importance of Booster Seats

The Texas Legislature is sending a bill to Governor Rick Perry that will change booster seat laws. The current law requires that children under five years of age and 3 feet 9 inches tall be in a car seat. The new law will require that children under the age of eight years or 4 feet 9 inches tall be restrained in a car seat. Car accidents are the leading cause of death for children in this age group and experts testified that changing the booster seat law would reduce the risk of life threatening injury by up to 60%.

The extra height provided by a booster seat allows the seat belt to be positioned correctly, across the child's pelvis. Without the booster the seat belt is often placed across the child's abdomen or neck, or even behind the shoulders and neck and puts them at risk for head, neck and abdominal injuries. Correct positioning of the belt is essential for maximum protection. Forty other states have similar laws requiring booster seat use. This bill will not go into effect in Texas until 2010, but don't wait until then to get your child a booster seat. Many parents already have their children in booster seats, but if not, put this at the top of your "to do list". If your children balk at the idea, tell them that it is for their protection and it is now a law! That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow.

Your Toddler

Recall: 1.6 million Unstable Mainstays Chest of Drawers

2:00

Ameriwood Home is recalling about 1.6 million Mainstays chests of drawers sold in the U.S. and Canada because they can easily tip-over if not anchored to the wall, posing serious tip-over and entrapment hazards that can result in death or injuries to children. The chests do not comply with the performance requirements of the U.S. voluntary industry standard.

This recall involves Mainstays four-drawer chests of drawers with plastic drawer glides and a single decorative pull on each drawer. The composite wood chests were sold in six colors: alder, black forest, white, weathered oak, walnut and ruby red. The chests measure 40- 5/16 inches high by 27-11/16 inches wide by 14-11/16 inches deep.

Model numbers included in the recall are 5412012WP, 5412301WP, 5412328WP, 5412015WY, 5412301WY, 5412012PCOM, 5412015PCOM, 5412026PCOM, 5412213PCOM, 5412214PCOM, 5412301PCOM, 5412317PCOM, and 5412328PCOM.

The model number is printed on the instruction manual. 

CPSC has received one report of an injury after a chest of drawers tipped over onto a four-year-old.

The chests of drawers were sold at Walmart stores and other retailers nationwide and online at Walmart.com from April 2009 through May 2016 for about $60.

Consumers should immediately stop using any recalled chest that is not properly anchored to the wall and place it into an area that children cannot access. Contact Ameriwood for a free repair kit that includes a wall anchoring device and feet for the unit. Consumers who require additional installation guidance should contact Ameriwood for further assistance.

Consumers can contact Ameriwood toll-free at 888-222-7460 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. CT Monday through Friday, or online at www.Ameriwood.com and click on Support for more information. 

More images of the recalled chests of drawers can be found online at: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/Ameriwood-Home-Recalls-Chests-of-Drawers#

 

Your Baby

Recall: Tommee Tippee Electric Bottle and Food Warmers Due to Fire Hazard

1:30

Mayborn USA is recalling about 255,000 Tommee Tippee electric bottle and food warmers because they could overheat and catch fire, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

This recall involves Tommee Tippee® Closer to Nature® electric bottle and food warmers, sold separately or as an accessory with the Complete Starter Kit or the All in One Newborn Set. The bottle and food warmer is white with a gray adjustable control dial located next to the on/off light. Tommee Tippee is stamped in gray on the front of the unit. It measures about 5 inches high, 5 ½ inches wide and 5 inches long. Bottle and food warmers included on this recall have “Min” or “0” stamped on the left-hand side of the control dial and have the UL logo and a six alpha-numeric batch code that begins with a number and ends with “GY” stamped on the underside. Consumers should visit www.tommeetippee.us/bottle-warmer to complete the free replacement registration form.

The firm has received six reports of bottle and food warmers overheating, melting, smoking and catching on fire; which resulted in $16,000 in property damage.

Consumers should immediately unplug and stop using the recalled bottle and food warmers and contact Mayborn for free replacement warmers.  

The product was sold at merchandise stores including Baby Depot, Baby Heaven, Bealls Outlet, BuyBuy Baby, CVS, Giant, Ideal Baby and Kids, Kohl’s, Marco Baby, Marshalls, Meijer, Ross Stores, Sam’s Club, Target, TJ Maxx, Toys R Us, Walgreens and Wal-Mart nationwide and online at Amazon.com, Diapers.com, Drugstore.com and Quidsi.com from July 2011 through April 2016 for about $21 for the individual bottle and food warmer and about $120 for the starter kit or newborn set.

Consumers can contact Mayborn online at www.tommeetippee.us and click on the recall button at the bottom of home page or toll-free at 844-340-3420 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Saturday for more information.

This Mayborn recall follows another recent recall from the company. In May 2016, over 3 million Tommee Tippee Sippee Spill-Proof Cups were recalled due to the possibility of mold build-up in the removable, one-piece white valve.

Mayborn USA had received 3,066 reports of mold in the removable, one-piece, opaque valve of the Sippee cups, including 68 reports of children experiencing diarrhea, vomiting or other symptoms associated with drinking from a cup with mold in the valve.

Story sources: https://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2016/Tommee-Tippee-Electric-Bottle-and-Food-Warmers-Recalled-by-Mayborn-USA/

http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2016/Tommee-Tippee-Sippee-Cups-Recalled-by-Mayborn-USA/

Your Baby

Never Leave a Child Unattended in a Car Seat, Swing or Bouncer

2:00

Placing an infant in a car seat, swing or bouncer as a substitute for a crib can be a fatal decision. These objects work fine when used properly for their intended purpose, but when a child is left unattended – they can quickly turn deadly according to a new study.

Using these devices as directed and not as substitutes for a crib would reduce the risk of death, according to lead author Dr. Erich K. Batra of Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, Pennsylvania.

“The overarching advice goes back to a more basic message of safe sleep,” Batra told Reuters Health. “In an infant, a safe sleep environment includes the ABCs: they sleep alone, not in bed between parents, on their backs, and in a crib or bassinet without any loose bedding.”

The study reviewed young children’s death in devices like car seats, swings and bouncers and found that most were due to suffocation by improper positioning or strangulation in straps.

The researchers reviewed the reports of 47 deaths of children under two years old that happened in car seats, bouncers, swings, strollers or slings and were recorded by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission between 2004 and 2008.

The study used only reports submitted by consumers or manufacturers, so the number of deaths may actually be higher.

Most of the deaths occurred in car seats (31 of 47). Five happened in slings, four each in swings and bouncers and three in strollers.

About half of deaths in car seats were due to strangulation by the straps, while the other half were caused by suffocation due to positioning, the authors reported in The Journal of Pediatrics.

Strap strangulation usually happens when the restraints are not fastened as directed, Batra said. Whenever a child is in a car seat, the harness should be secured.

“If people leave an older infant or young toddler in a car seat and undo the straps thinking that it makes them more comfortable, that’s a significant hazard,” he said.

“A child properly secured in a car seat is in very little risk of danger,” he said.

However, many times the child falls asleep in the car seat and a parent or caregiver decides to bring the car seat, with baby still attached, into the home.

Dr. Shital N. Parikh, an orthopedic surgeon at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Ohio, has studied the risk factors for injury in these devices in infants up to age one. He also found car seats to be the most common setting.

“The commonest mechanism of injury was infants falling from car seats when not used in the car, used in the home,” Parikh told Reuters Health. Often parents would bring the car seat in the house while the infant still slept, undo the straps and place it on an elevated surface, he said.

Even four-month-old babies are mobile enough to wiggle out of the top straps and fall, or topple the whole seat from an elevated surface, he said.

“These are very simple things, very basic things,” Parikh said. “The basic idea is that you use (the devices) for their intended purpose only. For infants, you should not use it to make them sleep or carry them around if it’s not intended for that.”

Batra notes that baby in slings need to be “visible and kissable,” as a sling may put baby’s head in a hazardous position.

It only takes four to five minutes for an unattended baby to suffocate in one of these devices.

“That is one of the things we need to draw attention to,” Batra said. Sometimes a few minutes unattended is all it takes.

“If your infant is sleeping and you’re not observing them, then they need to be in a safe sleeping environment,” adhering to the ABCs, he said.

While it may seem safe to leave a baby in a car seat, swing, sling or bouncer for a few minutes unattended, go ahead and place the child in his or her crib. It may wake them up if they are sleeping, but it’s much safer than allowing them to continue to sleep in a device that was never intended for that purpose.

Source: Kathryn Doyle, http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/04/29/us-car-seat-infant-safety-idUSKBN0NK21E20150429

Parenting

Norovirus Prevention: Tips for Swimming in Untreated Waters

2:00

With summer around the corner, lots of families will be headed to the lake for picnics, fishing and swimming. And not to rain on anyone’s parade, but every parent should be aware that the Norovirus loves untreated waters just as much as you and the kids do.

What is Norovirus? Noroviruses are a group of viruses that cause inflammation of the stomach and large intestine lining. They are the leading cause of gastroenteritis in the U.S.; In other words, severe vomiting and diarrhea.

Noroviruses are the same viruses that give you food poisoning – but they can also be active in waters that are untreated with chlorine such as lakes and ponds.

A norovirus outbreak in July 2014 was linked to a lake near Portland Oregon, and sickened 70 people. Those who swam in the lake were 2.3 times more likely to develop vomiting or diarrhea than those who visited the park but didn’t go in the water. More than half of those who got ill were children between 4–10 years old.

Experts believe the outbreak began after a swimmer infected with norovirus had diarrhea or vomited in the water and other swimmers swallowed the contaminated water. To prevent other people from getting sick, park officials closed the lake to swimmers for 10 days.

“Children are prime targets for norovirus and other germs that can live in lakes and swimming pools because they’re so much more likely to get the water in their mouths,” said Michael Beach, Ph.D, CDC’s associate director for healthy water. “Keeping germs out of the water in the first place is key to keeping everyone healthy and helping to keep the places we swim open all summer.”

Swimmers can help protect themselves, their families and friends by following a few easy and effective steps: 

Keep the pee, poop, sweat, and dirt out of the water!

•       Don’t swim if you have diarrhea or have been vomiting

•       Shower before you get in the water

•       Don’t pee or poop in the water

•       Don’t swallow lake or pool water

Every hour—everyone out!

•       Take kids on bathroom breaks

•       Check diapers, and change them in a bathroom or diaper-changing area–to keep germs away from the water.

Noroviruses, like other viruses, don't respond to antibiotics, which are designed to kill bacteria. No antiviral drug can treat noroviruses, but in healthy people the illness should go away on its own within a couple of days.

Children and the elderly are most susceptible to dehydration. Children should be given an oral rehydration solution (such as Pedialyte) to replace lost fluids and electrolytes. Avoid giving your child sugary drinks, which can make diarrhea worse, as well as caffeinated beverages, which can dehydrate them further.

Norovirus is very contagious and can be spread through contaminated food, water, or surfaces.

Summer is a time when families have more opportunities to have fun and spend time together. You can help make sure your picnic or day at the lake doesn’t include the side effects from a norovirus by adhering to the health safety prevention tips listed above.

Sources: http://www.physiciansbriefing.com/Article.asp?AID=699479

http://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2015/a0514-norovirus-from-swimming.html

http://www.webmd.com/children/norovirus-symptoms-and-treatment

Your Baby

Recall: Britax B-Agile and BOB Motion Strollers

2:00

About 676,000 Britax B-Agile and BOB Motion Strollers with Click & Go receivers have been recalled. A damaged receiver mount on the stroller can cause the car seat to disengage and fall unexpectedly, posing a fall hazard to infants in the car seat.

Britax has received 33 reports of car seats unexpectedly disconnecting from the strollers and falling to the ground, resulting in 26 reports of injuries to children, including scratches, bruises, cuts and bumps to the head. In addition, Britax is aware of 1,337 reports of strollers with damaged Click & Go receiver mounts.

This recall involves Britax B-Agile and BOB Motion strollers (when used as a travel system with a car seat carrier attached). All models are folding, single or double occupant strollers and have Click & Go receiver mounts that attach the car seat carrier to the stroller frame. All colors of the stroller are included. The model number can be found on the inside of the stroller’s metal frame near the right rear wheel for single strollers and in the front middle underside of the frame on double strollers.

Consumers should immediately stop using their Click & Go receiver mounts and contact Britax for a free repair kit for single strollers.  Owners of the recalled double strollers should stop using them with car seats attached. Consumers can continue to use their stroller or car seat independently without the car seat attached to the stroller.

Consumers can contact Britax online at www.us.britax.com and click on the Safety Notice on the homepage or visit us.britax.com/recall, call toll-free at 844-227-0300 from 8:30 a.m.to 7 p.m. ET Monday through Friday and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET Saturday or email Britax at stroller.recall@britax.com.

Recalled models numbers include:

B-Agile:

S01298600, S01298700, S01635200, S02063600, S02063700, S02063800, S02063900, S02064000, S03803400, S03803500, S03803700, S03803800, S03803900, S04144400, S04144500, S04144600, S04144700, S04144800, S04144900, S04145000, S04183700, S04183800, S04184000, S04281200, S04281300, S04402800, S04437700, S04628500, S04884200, S04884300, S04884400, S04884500, S04975600, S04978900, S05060600, S05260200, S05511600, S05511700, S865800, S865900, S874300, S874400, S874500, S877200, S890100, S896000, S896200, S896600, S907200, S907300, S907400, S907500, S907600, S910200, S910300, S910400, S910500, S912300, S914300, S914500, S914700, S914900, S915200, S915400, S917400, S921800, S921900, S923700, U341763, U341764, U341782, U341783, U341825, U341826, U341828, U341X82, U34X782, U361763, U361818, U361819, U361825, U391875, U451835, U451837, U451841, U461763, U461764, U461782, U461783, U461825, U461826, U461828, U471818, U471819, U491842, U491843, U491844, U491908, U491909, U491910, U511875, U511877, U551835, U551837, U551841, U551861, U551862, U551863, U551864, U551865, U551905, U551906, U691878, U691879, U691881, U691882, U691884, U691904, U691905, U721895, U721896

BOB Motion:

S888600, S890200, S890300, S890400, S890500, S909700, S910600, S910700, S910800, S910900, S912600, U391820, U391821, U391822, U481820, U481821, U481822, U501820, U501821, U501822, U501907

Images of the strollers can be seen below.

Story Source: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/Britax-Recalls-Strollers

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