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Daily Dose

Remember the Rules of Boating Safety

A tragic boating accident in our area during a Boy Scout outing to the lake has reminded me and many other parents of the necessity of following safe boating rules. While summer is here many families may have the opportunity for a boating outing. The best time to discuss boating safety and rules with your children is prior to even going on a boat.

Then another review of boating safety, (I would include jet skis in this too) should happen just before launching the boat on the water. Children of all ages should be taught boating safety and there should never be assumptions that they have heard all of the rules before. With the excitement of the day, many children and adolescents need to be continuously reminded of safe boating rules to ensure an accident free experience. All children and adults should have a Coast Guard certified life preserver (personal flotation device, PDF) and children should wear them at all times. In my opinion, adults should too, and model behavior for the kids. Whistles

Your Child

Powerful Narcotic Approved for Children

1:45

OxyContin is a powerful narcotic that is typically prescribed for adults who are in moderate to severe pain. It’s an opioid, similar to heroin that is the long-released formula of oxycodone. It can be highly addictive and is tightly regulated as a prescription.  For people who suffer from chronic or severe pain it is a potent drug that offers temporary relief.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved limited use of OxyContin for children as young as 11 years old. Children with moderate pain are sometimes prescribed smaller doses of morphine or non-opioid drugs. Fentanyl patches (Duragesic) , a synthetic opioid analgesic, is prescribed for severe pain relief to children.

Dr. Sharon Hertz, director of new anesthesia, analgesia and addiction products for the FDA, said studies by Purdue Pharma of Stamford, Connecticut, which manufactures the drug, "supported a new pediatric indication for OxyContin in patients 11 to 16 years old and provided prescribers with helpful information about the use of OxyContin in pediatric patients."

Because of OxyContin’s highly addictive properties, it is popular among addicts and drug dealers. Five years ago, Purdue reformulated the drug to make it more difficult for patients or users to crush the pills for a quick high.

Hertz noted that the FDA was putting strict limits on the use of OxyContin in children.  Unlike adults, children must already have shown that they can handle the drug by tolerating a minimum dose equal to 20 milligrams of oxycodone for five consecutive days, she said.

"We are always concerned about the safety of our children, particularly when they are ill and require medications and when they are in pain," she said. "OxyContin is not intended to be the first opioid drug used in pediatric patients, but the data show that changing from another opioid drug to OxyContin is safe if done properly."

 Parents, understandably, are concerned about giving their child such strong medications. Addiction and overdose are the two main worries parents specifically express when faced with the possibility of their child being put on these types of drugs. However, when children are given opioids to relieve pain, they are not seeking the "high" associated with the medication, they are given the medication in safe, consistent and controlled amounts. Generally, children look forward to reducing or stopping the medication as this indicates improvement in their pain control.

If children develop a physical dependence over several weeks, easing off the medication gradually as the pain diminishes can prevent withdrawal symptoms. Physical dependence should not be confused with addiction.

Overdose is extremely rare in children taking opioids for pain relief. If overdose does occur, it can be treated with an antidote called naloxone.

Children as well as adults sometimes need a strong drug to ease or stop severe pain associated with disease or surgery. The approval of limited OxyContin use for children gives them the benefits of pain relief when overseen and provided by the physicians in charge of their care.

Sources: M. Alex Johnson, http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/fda-approves-oxycontin-children-young-11-n409621

Michael Jeavons, MD, http://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/en/resourcecentres/pain/treatment/pages/opioids-safety-and-side-effects.aspx

 

Your Child

Frito-Lay Recalls Pretzels Due to Peanut Residue

2:00

Many children, who are allergic to peanuts and other nuts, consume pretzels as a snack.

Frito-Lay announced they are voluntarily recalling certain Rold Gold Tiny Twists, Rold Gold Thins, Rold Gold Sticks and Rold Gold Honey Wheat Braided due to a potential undeclared peanut allergen.

This recall is the direct result of a recent recall by a Frito-Lay supplier of certain lots of flour for undeclared peanut residue. The Rold Gold products subject to the recall may have been produced using the recalled flour and, as a result, these Rold Gold products may contain low levels of undeclared peanut residue. More information about the flour recall can be found on the FDA’s website at: http://www.fda.gov/Food/RecallsOutbreaksEmergencies/SafetyAlertsAdvisories/ucm504002.htm.

The affected Rold Gold packages are sold in retail stores and via foodservice and vending customers throughout the United States, and have “guaranteed fresh” dates ranging from June 28, 2016 - August 23, 2016 on the front of the package. Directly underneath the “guaranteed fresh” date is a 9-digit manufacturing code that includes the numbers “32” in the second and third position (example: x32xxxxxx).

The following products with the above-described “guaranteed fresh” dates and manufacturing codes are impacted:

•       Rold Gold Tiny Twists - 1 oz. , 2 oz., 16 oz. and 20½ oz.

•       Rold Gold Thins - 4 oz. and 16 oz.

•       Rold Gold Sticks - 16 oz.

•       Rold Gold Honey Wheat Braided - 10 oz.

It is important to note that products that do not include 32 in the second and third positions of the manufacturing code are not impacted.

The Rold Gold Tiny Twists are also included in select multipack offerings. The impacted multipacks have “use by” dates on the front of the package. Directly next to or underneath the “use by” date is a 11-digit manufacturing code that will include the letter combination AM, TO, QH, QC or SW in the second and third position (example: xAMxxxxxxxx). The impacted products have different, varying “use by” dates, including:

•       20 count Baked & Popped Mix -- “use by” dates ranging from May 31 - July 26, 2016

•       20 count SunChips & Rold Gold Mix -- “use by” dates ranging from June 14 - August 9, 2016

•       32 count Fun Times Mix -- “use by” dates ranging from June 14 - August 9, 2016

•       30 count Baked & Popped Variety Pack -- “use by” dates ranging from June 14 - August 9, 2016

•       30 count Home Town Favorite Variety Pack -- “use by” dates ranging from May 31 - July 26, 2016

To date, Frito-Lay has received no reports of illness related to the products covered by this recall. No other Rold Gold products or flavors are impacted. Frito-Lay has informed the FDA of our actions.

Consumers with any product noted above can return the product to retailer for a full refund, or contact Frito-Lay Consumer Relations (9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. CST, Mon.-Fri.) at 1-888-256-3090 or www.pretzelrecall.com.

Story source: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm505365.htm

 

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Daily Dose

Get Rid Of Drugs Safely

1.15 to read

Got drugs???  Saturday, April 26 is National Take Back Day.  This day is set aside to help you clean out your medicine cabinet and dispose of your old, unused and expired prescription medications safely.  This is a “no questions asked” opportunity to dispose of your medication, without contaminating the environment or throwing away medication improperly.

With teen prescription drug abuse on the rise and over 50% of teens reporting that they have obtained prescription drugs from a family medicine cabinet, what better time to check out your own family medicine cabinet.  It is surprising how many medications you might find that are either expired, or no longer being used. Rather than flush them down the toilet or throw them away, take them to a location (you can find a site on line at www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov) that will dispose of medications properly while protecting our environment and our water sources.

Accidental poisoning from medications in the medicine cabinet (or left on a kitchen shelf or table) is another problem for our children. It sometime seems that young children are better at opening “child proof caps” than many adults, and with many medicines being colorful children will eat a handful before deciding they may not taste so great. In some cases it only takes a few pills to cause toxicity. 

So, let’s all head to the medicine cabinet (or cabinets) and do a thorough spring cleaning.  Then, take that sack to your local drop off spot and feel a sense of accomplishment. We all should mark our calendars to do this every year.  

Parenting

Prepackaged Caramel Apples Linked to Listeria Outbreak

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This is the time of year when people eat food combos that they might not typically eat. One holiday treat is caramel coated apples, however, this year there is a warning to avoid pre-packaged caramel coated apples due to the possibility of contamination with Listeria.

Listeria can cause a serious, life-threatening illness.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is working with public health officials in several states and with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), investigating an outbreak of Listeria monocytogenes infections (listeriosis) linked to commercially produced, prepackaged caramel apples.

Out of an abundance of caution, CDC recommends that U.S. consumers do not eat any commercially produced, prepackaged caramel apples, including plain caramel apples as well as those containing nuts, sprinkles, chocolate, or other toppings, until more specific guidance can be provided.

Although caramel apples are often a fall seasonal product, contaminated commercially produced, prepackaged caramel apples may still be for sale at grocery stores and other retailers nationwide or may be in consumers’ homes.

Investigators are working quickly to determine specific brands or types of commercially produced, prepackaged caramel apples that may be linked to illnesses and to identify the source of contamination.

As of December 22, 2014, a total of 29 people infected with the outbreak strains of Listeria monocytogenes have been reported from 10 states:

·      Arizona (4)

·      California (1)

·      Minnesota (4)

·      Missouri (5)

·      New Mexico (5)

·      North Carolina (1)

·      Texas (4)

·      Utah (1)

·      Washington (1)

·      Wisconsin (3).

Illness onset dates range from October 17, 2014, to November 27, 2014. Nine illnesses have been associated with a pregnancy (occurred in a pregnant woman or her newborn infant).

Among people whose illnesses were not associated with a pregnancy, ages ranged from 7 to 92 years, with a median age of 66 years, and 41% were female.

Three invasive illnesses (meningitis) occurred among otherwise healthy children aged 5–15 years.

All 29 ill people have been hospitalized and, five deaths have been reported. Listeriosis contributed to three of these deaths and it is unclear whether it contributed to a fourth.

The fifth death was unrelated to listeriosis.

At this time, no illnesses related to this outbreak have been linked to apples that are not caramel-coated and not prepackaged or to caramel candy.

These products could have a shelf life of more than one month. CDC, the involved states, and FDA continue to work closely on this rapidly evolving investigation, and new information will be provided as it becomes available.

Source: http://www.cdc.gov/listeria/outbreaks/caramel-apples-12-14/index.html

Your Child

PetSmart Expands Fish Bowl Recall Due to Lacerations

1:30

PetSmart is expanding its recall of fishbowls after several injury reports.

The glass fishbowls can crack, shatter or break during normal handling, posing a laceration hazard to consumers.

This recall involves the 1.75-gallon glass fishbowl that is shaped like a brandy snifter. These fishbowls were sold under the Grreat Choice or Top Fin brand names with SKU number 5140161 and UPC code 737257187092. The SKU and UPC codes are printed on a white sticker on the bottom of the fishbowl.

PetSmart has received 20 new reports of the glass fishbowl breaking during normal use, including 14 additional reports of cuts to fingers and hands. Seven cuts required stitches and three others required surgery for lacerated tendons.  

About 81,300 of these fishbowls were sold exclusively at PetSmart stores and online from March 2010 through September 2013 for about $20.

This recall comes on the heal of a previous recall involving the Top Fin Betta Bowl Kit.

Bowls can break, crack or shatter with normal use.

The Top Fin Betta Bowl Kits with LED Lights include a 0.6-gallon glass betta bowl and a base with an LED light. The plastic bases come in black, blue, pink, purple and silver. The following UPC numbers are located on the packages of recalled items.

Colors:

Black- UPC: 73725752848

Blue- UPC: 73725747577

Blue- UPC: 73725747577

Pink-UPC:  73725747595 

Purple            - UPC: 73725752855

Silver- UPC: 73725747598

The firm has received seven reports of incidents, including five reports of cuts to fingers and hands.

About 148,000 bowls were sold in the United States.

The fishbowls were sold exclusively at PetSmart stores nationwide and online at www.petsmart.com from September 2013 through October 2015 for about $25.

Consumers should immediately stop using the fish bowls and return the fish bowl to any PetSmart store for a full refund. Use caution when handling the fish bowl for return due to the hazard. 

Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/recalls/2016/petsmart-expands-recall-of-fish-bowls/

Your Child

McDonald’s Recalls Kid's “Step-iT” Wristbands Due to Burns, Skin Irritations

1:30

About 29 million of McDonald’s “Step-iT” activity wristbands have been recalled in the U.S. due to skin irritations or burns to children.

The recall involves “Step-iT” activity wristbands, which come in two styles—“Activity Counter” and a motion-activated “Light-up Band.” The Activity Counter comes in translucent plastic orange, blue or green and features a digital screen that tracks a child’s steps or other movement. The Light-up Band comes in translucent plastic red, purple, or orange and blinks light with the child’s movement. Both styles of activity wristbands have a square face with the words “STEP-iT” printed on them and a button to depress and activate the wristband. The back of the square face contains the etched words “Made for McDonald’s.” 

The company has received more than 70 reports of incidents, including seven reports of blisters, after wearing the wristbands.

Consumers should immediately take the recalled wristbands from children and return them to any McDonald’s for a free replacement toy and either a yogurt tube or bag of apple slices.

The wristbands were distributed exclusively by McDonald’s restaurants nationwide, from August 9, 2016 to August 17, 2016 with Happy Meals and Mighty Kids Meals. 

Consumers can contact McDonald’s at 800-244-6227 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. CT daily, or online at www.mcdonalds.com and click on “Safety Recall” for more information. 

You can see all the models recalled on http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2016/McDonalds-Recalls-Step-iT-Activity-Wristbands/

Daily Dose

Parents Ignore New Car Seat Recomendations

1.45 to read

I have been surprised at the number of parents I have seen lately, who are either unaware or choose to ignore the changes in car seat recommendations for children under the age of two.I have been surprised at the number of parents I have seen, who are either unaware or choose to ignore the changes in car seat recommendations for children under the age of two.

I try to discuss car seat safety at each check-up appointment, and have always been especially mindful of doing this at the one-year check up. A new policy (April 2011) by colleagues at the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends what I have been discussing for a while now: children up to age two should remain in rear-facing safety seats. The new policy is supported by research that shows children younger than 2 are 75% less likely to die or be severely injured in a crash if they are rear-facing. So how did we get here? Original recommendations (established in 2009), I had followed with my own patients. I discussed turning the car seat to a forward facing position if the child had reached 12 months and 20 pounds. Then in April, an article was published (Inj Prev. 2007;13:398-402), which was the first U.S. data to substantiate the benefits of toddlers riding rear facing until they are two years of age. This study showed that children under the age of two are 75 percent less likely to die or experience a serious injury when they are riding in a rear-facing. That is a fairly compelling statistic to keep that car seat rear-facing for another year! Studies have shown that rear-facing seats are more likely to support the back, neck, head and pelvis because the force of a crash is distributed evenly over the entire body. Toddlers between the ages of 12 and 23 months who ride rear facing are more than five times safer than toddlers in that same age group who ride forward-facing in a car seat. There has also been concern that rear-facing toddlers whose feet reach the back of the seat are more likely to suffer injuries to the lower extremities in a car accident. But a commentary written by Dr. Marilyn Bull in Pediatrics (2008;121:619-620) dispelled the myth with documentation that lower extremity injuries were rare with rear-facing seats. So, it has now been over two years since this data was published and recommended, and parents continue to say, “I just turned the seat around any way” or “I didn’t know.” I did go look at car-seats the other day and I noted that the labeling on the boxes had all been changed to recommend rear facing until two years or until a toddler reaches the maximum height and weight recommendations for the model. I take this to mean that some “small” toddlers could even rear face longer as they do in some European countries. For safety sake, rather than convenience, keep that car seat in the rear facing position. I wonder if they will begin putting DVD players and cup holders facing toward these toddlers, as that seemed to be a concern of many parents. Maybe this will make it “okay” to listen to music or talk while in the car rather than watching TV, at least until a child is older!! If you need references on car seats go to http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov or http://www.seatcheck.org Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue!

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