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Daily Dose

Summer Series: A Lesson in Pool Safety

Every year 900 children 14 years and younger drown in swimming pool mishaps. Unfortunately, most of these drownings are totally preventable.Swimming pool season is in full swing so it is a good time to reiterate pool safety. Every year, 900 children 14 years and younger drown in swimming pool mishaps. Unfortunately, most of these drownings are totally preventable.

Studies have shown that nine out of the 10 children over the age of 1 who died were “supervised”.  The best way to prevent any drowning is by having fencing surrounding all pools. That means four feet high on all four sides. It is amazing how even a young toddler can unlock a door, or climb on a chair and undo a latch or climb out of an open window into a yard with direct access to a pool. Children are clever, quick and quiet when they want to be. Drownings are silent, and many times the last place a parent looks for their missing child is at the bottom of the pool, long after it is too late. So, after fencing a pool with a locking gate, you also need to have the appropriate equipment at the pool while your children are swimming. The first thing that should always be nearby is a telephone. There should also be an appropriate rescue floatation ring available. Anyone supervising a child should be a “designated supervisor” so that they are totally aware that they are in charge and should be within arm’s reach of the “non swimmer” child at all times. Optimally, the supervising adult is also CPR trained (a good summer activity for all, go take CPR). Lastly, “The Virginia Graeme Baker Law” which is federal legislation passed in 2007, requires all pools to be retrofitted with new drains to avoid suction entrapment and drowning. Despite this act, it seems that not all pools, both public and private, have complied. It might be wise to inquire if your pool is updated, and new drains have been installed. At the same time it is a good idea to teach children to stay away from drains in general. Swimming is one of the highlights of summer for all ages, and safety is paramount to that. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

Your Child

Zip Lining Safety Tips

1:45

From the mountains of Costa Rica to over waterfalls in Hawaii, zip lining has become a vacation acivity destination. Zip lining operations can also be found in  summer camps, zoos, fields in the middle nowhere, people’s backyards and lots of other exotic and not-so- exotic locations.

Here’s how they work. A zip line consists of a pulley suspended on a cable, typically made of stainless steel and mounted on an incline. A rider sits in a harness attached to a pulley. At the top of the slope, the user propels forward and gravity does the rest. Depending on your location, it can be quite a thrilling ride to the base.

One of the keys to a safe zip lining experience is knowing something about the company and the operator of the ride. Before you harness your child into a zip line at camp or during a family vacation, ask the operator questions about the ride’s safety and look around. Not every company follows the same safety rules. Though there are currently no national standards for zip line construction and operation, many states have them, and any legitimate operator should also adhere to the standards set by the Association for Challenge Course Technology or the Professional Ropes Course Association.

Here are some questions you can ask:

·      If the operation is inspected, how often and by whom.

·      What is the company’s safety record?

·      What training the operators have.

·      Is a safety demonstration included?

Check the area out once you arrive. Do the operators look professional? Look at the equipment provided, including carabiners, ropes, harnesses and helmets. Are they well maintained? Look at the course itself. Do the lines look free from wear and tear? How about the platforms? Do they look sturdy? Do they have guardrails?

Once on the course, make sure you're strapped onto a safety line at all times — not just while you're zipping through space. (Some places require that you have two safety lines hooked on.) Many accidents occur by a simple step off a platform. So if you're on the course (which often means many feet off the ground), you should be safely attached to a line that will catch you if you fall. Also, watch out for other adventurers and the guides. Don't get in their way.

Make sure everyone in the family who is zip lining wears a helmet and has closed-toe shoes.

Nearly 17,000 zip line injuries were treated in emergency rooms from 1997-2012, and most of those injuries were in the last four years, according to a 2015 study by Gary A. Smith, M.D., Dr.P.H., FAAP, and colleagues at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. About half the injuries involved children under 10 years old. Another 33% involved children ages 10-19 years. The study noted that many zip lines are not regulated, and there are no uniform safety standards.

The increase in the number of zip line injuries in children is “an epidemic by any definition,” according to Dr. Smith, past chair of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Council on Injury, Violence and Poison Prevention.

“If kids are using them, you really need to make sure they’re using them in places where people are trained, they know what they’re doing and the zip lines have been constructed in a way that they’re not going to fail,” said Dr. Smith.

Backyard zip line kits sold online and in stores also have been linked to injuries. Earlier this year, the Consumer Product Safety Commission recalled a backyard zip line kit (http://1.usa.gov/1XoHrFs) because of a design flaw that made it easy for the cable to separate from the line, causing riders to fall. Riders suffered head injuries and bruises. Another recall was issued in 2014 for backyard zip line trolleys (http://1.usa.gov/1RT6uaY) that released unexpectedly. No injuries were reported. Authors of the 2015 study warned against buying and installing backyard zip lines.

The AAP does not have a policy on zip lines and children. However, Dr. Smith suggested the following safety precautions:

·      Requiring riders to wear a helmet, harness and gloves;

·      Training operators;

·      Inspecting and maintaining equipment regularly; and

·      Posting rules and requiring participants to follow them.

“If done correctly, these and other types of outdoor amusements that are there for the thrill … can be done in a safe enough way that it’s reasonable for children to use them,” Dr. Smith said.

Story sources: Trisha Korioth, http://www.aappublications.org/news/2016/07/07/ZipLines070716

John Donovan, http://www.mnn.com/lifestyle/eco-tourism/stories/6-things-do-you-go-zip-lining

Parenting

Fourth of July Safety Tips

2:00

For Americans, it doesn’t get any more patriotic than Independence Day- or as most folks call it- July 4th.  The holiday celebrates the adoption of the Declaration of Independence, drafted by Thomas Jefferson, in 1776.

It’s traditionally been a high-spirited holiday with fireworks, casual family and friends’ gatherings, parades, lake and pool parties, music and lots of food. 

All these activities help build life’s memorable moments, however, the one memory you don’t want is a visit to the emergency room.

Here are some safety tips to keep in mind while enjoying the Fourth:

Fireworks: It’s really best to leave fireworks to the professionals, but if you’re planning on setting off some during the Fourth of July celebrations, follow these tips:

1. Be sure fireworks are legal in your area before using or buying them

2. Always have an adult supervise fireworks activities and never allow children to play with or ignite fireworks. Sparklers alone account for one quarter of emergency room fireworks injuries

3. If you set off fireworks, keep a bucket of water or fire extinguisher handy in case of malfunction or fire.

4. If fireworks malfunction, don’t relight them! Douse and soak them with water then throw them away.

5. Never ignite fireworks in a container, especially one that is glass or metal.

Grilling: Malfunctioning gas grills cause the majority of grill fires. In addition, thousands of people visit emergency rooms every year because they have burned themselves while barbecuing.

1.     Use your grill well away from your home and deck railings, and out from under branches or overhangs.

2.     Open your gas grill before lighting.

3.     Periodically remove grease or fat buildup in trays below your gas or propane grill so it cannot be ignited.

4.     Declare a three-foot "kid and pet-free zone" around the grill to keep them safe.

5.     Avoid loose clothing that can catch fire when cooking on the grill.

Water Safety: According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, about one in five people who die from drowning are children 14 and younger. For every child who dies from drowning, another five receive emergency department care for nonfatal submersion injuries.

1.     Never leave a young child unattended near water and do not trust a child’s life to another child; teach children to always ask permission to go near water.

2.     Have young children or inexperienced swimmers wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets around water, but do not rely on life jackets alone.

3.     Establish rules for your family and enforce them without fail. For example, set limits based on each person’s ability, do not let anyone play around drains and suction fittings, and do not allow swimmers to hyperventilate before swimming under water or have breath-holding contests.

4.     Even if you do not plan on swimming, be cautious around natural bodies of water including ocean shoreline, rivers and lakes. Cold temperatures, currents and underwater hazards can make a fall into these bodies of water dangerous.

5.     If you go boating, wear a life jacket! Most boating fatalities occur from drowning.

6.     Avoid alcohol use. Alcohol impairs judgment, balance and coordination; affects swimming and diving skills; and reduces the body’s ability to stay warm.

7.     Always keep a charged cell phone with you for emergency use, but do not get distracted using your phone to text, surf the net or reading emails.

July 4th is a historic holiday and one that holds a special place in America’s heart.  Make sure your 4th is memorable for all the right reasons.

Happy Independence Day!

Story sources: https://www.fema.gov/news-release/2016/06/30/ten-safety-tips-4th-july

https://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/water-safety/waterinjuries-factsheet.html

http://www.iii.org/article/grilling-safely

 

Your Teen

Headlines: Another Teen Suicide

On September 6, 2007, the Centers for Disease and Prevention reported suicide rates in American adolescents (especially girls, 10 to 24 years old) increased 8%, the largest increase in 15 years.The sad and desperate story of a college student who killed himself after a roommate secretly videotaped him having sex, and streamed it live on the web has made headlines across the world.

18 year old, Tyler Clementi, was embarrassed and humiliated by the invasion of his privacy. He jumped to his death from the George Washington Bridge. Unfortunately, Tyler is not the only teen who thinks suicide is the only way to end his suffering. On September 6, 2007, the Centers for Disease and Prevention reported suicide rates in American adolescents (especially girls, 10 to 24 years old) increased 8%, the largest increase in 15 years. Amazingly, suicide is the third leading cause of death for 15-to-24-year-olds, and the sixth leading cause of death for 5-to-14-year-olds. The current headlines demonstrate that it is more important than ever that parents are aware of the symptoms of depression and substance abuse.  Suicides increase substantially when the two are combined. What symptoms should I look for? - Change in eating and sleeping habits - Withdrawal from friends, family, and regular activities. - Violent, rebellious behavior, or running away - Drug and alcohol use. - Unusual neglect of personal appearance - Marked personality change - Persistent boredom, difficulty concentrating, or a decline in the quality of     schoolwork - Frequent complaints about physical symptoms, often related to emotions, such as stomachaches, headaches, fatigue, etc. - Loss of interest in pleasurable activities. - Not tolerating praise or rewards. A teenager who is planning to commit suicide may also: - Complain of being a bad person or feeling rotten inside. - Give verbal hints with statements such as: “I won't be a problem for you much longer,”    “ Nothing matters,” “It's no use, and I won't see you again.” - Put his or her affairs in order, for example, give away favorite possessions, clean his or her room, throw away important belongings, etc. - Become suddenly cheerful after a period of depression - Have signs of psychosis (hallucinations or bizarre thoughts.) What should you do if you notice these symptoms in your child? If a child or adolescent says, "I want to kill myself," or "I'm going to commit suicide,"  always take the statement seriously and immediately seek assistance from a qualified mental health professional. People often feel uncomfortable talking about death. However, asking the child or adolescent whether he or she is depressed or thinking about suicide can be helpful. Rather than putting thoughts in the child's head, such a question will provide assurance that somebody cares and will give the young person the chance to talk about problems. If one or more of these signs occurs, parents need to talk to their child about their concerns and seek professional help from a physician or a qualified mental health professional. With support from family and appropriate treatment, children and teenagers who are suicidal can heal and return to a healthier mental outlook.

Daily Dose

Why Kids Should Wear a Helmet

1:30 to read

Accidents in children are always an ever present problem. From scraped knees, to bumped heads, broken arms and stitches there are always injuries in our children. Accidents in children are always an ever present problem. From scraped knees, to bumped heads, broken arms and stitches there are always injuries in our children. Thank goodness most of them are traumatic at the moment, usually more to the parent than the child, and the child quickly recovers and is on to the next thing.

One way to help protect our children is by using protective "gear" when appropriate. We are really good about using car seats, child proofing houses and pools for the toddler set, but as the children get older there are other dangers lurking around with the bicycles, scooters, skateboards and the newest rip stick. All of these "wheeled" devices pose dangers for falls and "wipe outs" that may lead to things as mild as cuts and scrapes or as serious as a head injury. The hardest thing to get a school age child to understand is the meaning of the word ACCIDENT.

They do not understand that even if they think they have mastered the bike or rip stick, an accident can happen at any time. When I am talking to the elementary school set and ask them about mastering a bicycle on two wheels they are so proud to tell me of their accomplishments. But when I ask them what they are wearing on their head while riding, I don't always hear "a helmet". Children and adults on bicycles need to wear helmets at all times. I see kids riding their bikes to school (great exercise), but not a helmet in sight on their head. Don't let your child on their bicycles without a helmet, insist on a helmet just like a seat belt. If they become accustomed to always putting on a helmet before hopping on that bike or skateboard it will just become second nature. If they choose not to wear their helmet, then put the bike in "time out" for awhile to let them know that you are not going to allow them to ride without protection. Knee pads and wrist guards are great, but we can usually set a wrist fracture, or stitch up a knee. A head injury is another story!

That's your daily dose, we'll chat tomorrow.

Your Toddler

High Chair Recall Due to Fall Danger

1:30

Nuna Baby Essentials has recalled eight models of their baby high chairs because the arm bar can bend or detach during use, posing a fall hazard to children.

Nuna has received 50 reports of the arm bar detaching, including six reports of children falling from the high chair. Four incidents resulted in injuries, including bruising and a cut on the forehead.

This recall includes ZAAZTM high chairs in eight models: HC-07-004 (pewter), HC-07-005 (carbon), HC-07-006 (plum), HC-07-009 (almond), HC-08-004 (pewter), HC-08-005 (carbon), HC-08-006 (plum) and HC-08-009 (almond). ZAAZ and the model number are printed under the high chair seat on a white sticker. These high chairs look like a regular kitchen table chair and have removable trays, arm bars footrests, seat pads and harnesses so that they can convert into toddler chairs. “Nuna” is printed above the footrest of the unit.

The high chairs were sold at Albee Baby, Giggle, Magic Bean, Nordstrom and other specialty stores nationwide and online at www.nuna.eu and www.wayfair.com and other online retailers from February 2013 through November 2015 for about between $250 and $300. 

Consumers should immediately stop using these recalled high chairs and contact the firm to receive a free new arm bar and instructions on how to replace it.

For more information, Nuna Baby Essentials has a toll-free number at 855-686-2872 from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. ET Monday through Friday. Or consumers can go online at www.nuna.eu/usa/ and click on “Product Recall” under the “Support” section on the sidebar of the homepage for more information.

Source; http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2016/Nuna-Baby-Essentials-Recalls-High-Chairs/

Your Toddler

Anchor It!

1:45

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has launched “Anchor It”, a national public education campaign, to help make people aware of the dangers that free-standing furniture and TVs present, particularly to children.

The annual number of children injured or killed from furniture and TV tip-overs is astounding.

According to CPSC data, unstable and unsecured TVs and large pieces of furniture kill a child every two weeks, on average, in tip-over incidents that are easily preventable.  CPSC also reported that 38,000 Americans go to emergency rooms each year with injuries related to tip-overs of top-heavy furniture or televisions placed on furniture, instead of a TV stand.  Two-thirds of those injuries involved children younger than 5.  Additionally, between 2000 and 2013, 84 percent of the 430 deaths reported to CPSC involved children younger than 10.

A January 2015 CPSC report found that a television tipping over from an average size dresser falls with thousands of pounds of force. 

The impact of a falling TV is like being caught between two NFL linemen colliding at full-speed—10 times. 

“Every 24 minutes in the U.S. a child goes to the emergency room because of a tip-over incident involving furniture or a TV,” said CPSC Commissioners Marietta Robinson and Joseph Mohorovic. “We must take action now. CPSC’s new ‘Anchor It!’ campaign is a call to action for parents and caregivers to ‘get on top of it, before they do.’ If we can prevent one more death, it will be worth it.”

Cards and posters are being distributed parents and caregivers of toddlers at daycare centers and preschools. A list of safety steps parents and caregivers can take are printed on the handouts. They are:

·      Buy and install low-cost anchoring devices to prevent TVs, dressers, bookcases or other furniture from tipping.

·      Avoid leaving items, such as remote controls and toys, in places where kids might be tempted to climb up to reach for them.

·      Store heavier items on lower shelves or in lower drawers.

·      Place TVs on a sturdy, low base and push them as far back as possible, particularly if anchoring is not possible.

·      If purchasing a new TV, consider recycling older ones not currently used. If moving the older TV to another room, be sure it is anchored properly to the wall.

The “Anchor It” campaign’s website (www.Anchorit.gov) shows you how to anchor furniture and television sets properly, with easy to follow instructions. Keep your little one safe and Anchor It!

 

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Daily Dose

Thimerosal In Flu Vaccines

Confusion about thimerosal in flu vaccinesI received an email from a reader who “had a problem with my statement about vaccines being thimerosal free”.  Since 2001 all vaccines given to children under the age of 6 are thimerosal free, with the exception of the influenza vaccine.

She is correct in pointing out that influenza vaccines may contain a minimal amount of thimerosal (a mercury based preservative), but influenza vaccines are also available thimerasol free.  The LAIV (live nasal vaccine/flumist), is also thimerasol free and is available for use in children 2 and older.

Although injectable influenza vaccines may contain a minimal amount of thimerosal, the amount is negligible and is deemed safe by both the FDA and the CDC. Infants are not receiving a series of vaccines containing thimerasol, and at most would receive 2 influenza vaccines after they are 6 months of age during the first season that they are vaccinated, and subsequently would receive one dose per year thereafter.  There are also thimerasol free influenza vaccines available (this year both seasonal and “swine flu” vaccines) for use. By the time a child is 2 years of age, they would at most have received 3 doses of an influenza vaccine that had  0.01% thimerasol or less which would be between <1 mcg – 25 mcg/0.5ml vaccine dose. (Do you know how much mercury is in the fish you eat or other products you consume daily?)  After the age of 2 parents may choose to have their child immunized for influenza with the LAIV nasal vaccine that is also thimerasol free. As with many things in life one must weigh the risk benefit ratio, in this case of giving a vaccine that contains minimal thimerasol. In my opinion the science has quite eloquently proven that there is not a link between the preservative thimerasol and autism. With that being said,  I also believe that the risk of an infant developing flu and having complications from their infection, far outweighs any hypothetical or anecdotal concern about thimerasol. As I have said before, we know what does not cause autism and it was not thimerasol in vaccines. In fact the rate of diagnosis of autism has gone up, rather than down, since thimerasol was removed from vaccines. We need to continue to devote research dollars to finding the cause of autism. In the meantime, I stand corrected and wanted to give all of you more detailed information about thimerasol and influenza vaccines. That's your daily dose.  We'll chat again tomorrow! Send your question to Dr. Sue! (click here)

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Count your blessings this Thanksgiving!

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