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Daily Dose

Button battery Dangers

1.15 to read

I saw a patient the other night who was having difficulty swallowing and her parent’s thought that she had swallowed something. She was a toddler and had been playing with her sister and then suddenly started coughing and having a hard time swallowing. When  saw her she seemed to be “ok” but looked like she was having a hard time swallowing and wouldn’t eat or drink.  Fortunately she was not having any respiratory distress. 

Her parents were not sure of what she might have swallowed, but the first thing that comes to mind is that she might have swallowed a button battery.  Button battery ingestions are on the rise as more and more devices like remote controls, games and other household objects use the 3 volt 20 millimeter lithium batteries.  

An article in the May issue of Pediatrics reported that there were nearly 66,000 battery related ER visits by children under the age of 18 during a 20 year span. More than 75% of all battery related hospital visits involved children 5 or younger. 

Because of the article and her presentation I immediately sent her to the ER for an x-ray to look for a possible ingestion of a foreign body.  Ingestion of a button battery is considered a medical emergency so it is important that the diagnosis is made quickly. In most cases the battery will pass into the stomach and then be “pooped” out. 

There are reports of parents finding a battery in the stool and never knowing that the child had ingested a foreign body. But, if the battery lodges in the esophagus it may result in alkaline burns and corrosion and perforation of the esophagus. The longer the battery remains in the esophagus and GI tract the greater the chance for complications. 

Good news is that this little girl had swallowed a foreign object, but it was not a battery but a barrette used for her sister’s hair.  The pediatric ENT doctors were able to scope her and remove the barrette without problems and she is as good as new! 

But, if you ever think your child may have swallowed “something” make sure to consider those button batteries. Better yet, childproof all of those devices in the house by taping them shut and keep all batteries up and out of reach of children.   You know a toddler, they will put anything in their mouths, just not the foods that you are trying to get them to eat! 

That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

 

Daily Dose

Water Safety

1:30 to read

Memorial Day weekend is almost here and that means summer water activities. While the pool is a great place to stay cool it is also unfortunately associated with drowning.  Drowning is the leading cause of death in children between the ages of 1-4 years and is the second leading cause of accidental death for children under the age of 14.  

 

Drownings are more likely to happen not at the child’s own home, but while a child is at a swim party, or a neighbors house.  Drowning is a SILENT event. While most people think of drowning being noisy with lots of splashing and screaming (as depicted on TV and movies), children rarely scream, call for help or thrash around. They quietly go under water…..and don’t come back up.

 

Statistics show that in 35% of drownings there is no adult supervision, and 57% of drownings occur in residential pools.  About 40% of children drown when not swimming , but after accidentally falling into the water. I have witnessed this myself when filming a segment on pool safety at my own pool! The toddler, who was standing right next to me, slipped and fell right into the pool….but I was literally standing less than an arm’s length away, witnessed the entire event and pulled him right back out of the pool…both of us wet and scared!!! It only takes a second for this to happen.

 

The AAP now recommends that children begin formal swim lessons at younger ages as the risk of drowning is reduced by 88% with formal swim lessons.  The AAP does not endorse “survival swimming” lessons for young children. 

 

Drowning is preventable!! Make sure that your children have adult supervision whenever they swim, and don’t let children swim alone. Even teens can drown and should not swim alone….

When attending pool events, whether at home or away, designate an adult to be the “water watcher” so that no one assumes someone else is responsible. The “water watcher “is dedicated to one task, supervising the children…so no texting, socializing, drinking etc. while on duty.

 

Protecting children around the pool also means having the correct equipment!  Pools should all be enclosed by a non-climbable fence with a self locking gate, which ensures that no one can wander into the pool before there is adult is on duty!  Children who do not know how to swim should wear a Coast Guard approved personal flotation device , and not water wings or floaties. The pool deck should also have appropriate water rescue equipment ready, which includes pool noodles, safety rings and a first aid kit. Keep a phone nearby as well for ready access to call 911 if an emergency should occur. 

 

Swimming is fun and a great way to exercise. Don’t forget the sunscreen and make sure to re-apply throughout the day. Have a good Memorial Day and a safe start to summer!!! 

Daily Dose

Stranger Danger

1.30 to read

We had a question via our iPhone App from an aunt who wanted to talk to her twin 4 year old nephews about “stranger danger”. Unfortunately, this topic has been in the news quite frequently lately with child abduction cases being reported all around the country.

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children has numerous resources for educating children about safety.  Interestingly, most perpetrators are not actually strangers, but are often someone the parents or another adult knows and may have been around the child on occasion. So, it seems that “stranger danger” may not be the appropriate term to use when teaching our children, especially younger, children about safety. It is important that the conversation about safety begins with children at young ages. It is often easier to use teachable moments to begin the conversation with young children. 

Talk to your child about “safe” strangers, as it is hard for a child to understand why you are talking to grocery store clerks, or people on the playground in the park, and yet they are strangers. It may be best to teach a child to watch out for dangerous behaviors from adults, rather than saying “never talk to strangers”.  Talk about adults who might approach them for directions, or to find a missing pet and role play as to what they should  do. At the same time, teach them that they can turn to “strangers” such a store clerks or mothers with children for help if they are scared.

While talking about this subject use a calm reassuring manner.  You do not want to make your child “too” anxious as most people they will meet are not dangerous, and children do need to interact and trust numerous people around them that they will meet in  different situations.

Another good way to discuss the issue of “stranger danger” is by reading books to young children that deal with the issue. Several good books that I like are:  The Berenstein Bears Learn About Strangers; A Stranger in the Park; I  Can Play it Safe.  There are many other books out there too, so head to your library  or your local bookstore to get some more recommendations. The librarians are often helpful with finding “age appropriate” books.  Lastly, this is not a one time conversation, but should be discussed at different ages and stages of your child’s life.

That's your daily dose.  We'll chat again tomorrow.

Parenting

Hobby Lobby Recalls 43,000 Light-Up Spinner Toys

1:00

Hobby Lobby is recalling about 43,000 children’s battery-powered, light-up spinner toys sold in two themes: Easter and July 4th. The Easter-themed toys were sold in blue with a pink bunny on the dome and yellow with a yellow and orange chicken on the dome. The July 4th spinners are red with white stars painted on the blue dome. “Hobby Lobby” and item number 9130033 or 9130082 is printed on the spinner handle. Three LR44 coin cell batteries power the spinners.

The battery cover can detach and expose the small coin cell batteries, posing choking and ingestion hazards to young children.

Hobby Lobby has received one report of a 14-month-old child who ingested the battery.

Consumers should immediately take the recalled spinners away from children and return them to the nearest Hobby Lobby or Mardel store. Consumers with a receipt will receive a full refund and consumers without a receipt will receive a store credit.

The spinners were sold at Hobby Lobby and Mardel stores nationwide from February 2017 to April 2017 for about $5.

Consumers can contact Hobby Lobby Stores at 800-326-7931 between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or online at www.hobbylobby.com and click on the Recall tab for more information.

Story source: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/Hobby-Lobby-Recalls-Easter-and-July-4th-Light-Up-Spinner-Toys

Daily Dose

National Safety Month

1:30 to read

June is National Safety Month…just in time for summer! It is a good reminder for all of us to try and prevent any injuries in our children. I do know from my own pediatric office that we see more injuries during the summer months. Whether it is from falls, bike accidents, pool incidents, household poisonings or burns, our phones stay busy.

 

So..this is the perfect time to re-think child proofing your home. Make sure that stairs are gated, both top and bottom. Cabinets need to have child proof latches to protect children from getting into breakable or sharp objects as well as medicines or household products that may be poisonous.  Put the number for Poison Control in your phone….1-800-222-1222. I am often surprised that a parent calls our office about a child who has “gotten into “ a possible poison…the first call should be to Poison Control. Keep the number posted in the house as well so a babysitter may also have it if necessary.

 

Learning to ride a bike a is “life skill” for sure….but that also includes learning to wear your helmet. I see most young children in our neighborhood who are still under the eye of a parent with a bike helmet, but once they are older I often see kids without helmets. Just saw a neighbor’s child ride down the street this evening..no helmet!!  Bike helmets are like a seat belt…not optional. Many “tween” boys will “debate” with me during their check ups about the need for a helmet,  as they tell me “ I am a great bike rider and don’t have wrecks”. Teach your children what the word ACCIDENT means and that just like a car…you never know what “the other guy may do”.  Accidents are NEVER planned and a bike helmet protects the head and brain. We can “fix” the broken arm or stitch a leg…but cannot “fix” a brain injury.

 

Texting and driving is unsafe and may even be illegal in your state. Texas just passed a law prohibiting texting and driving….but teens (and adults)  need to be reminded on a regular basis that texting is not allowed!!  Texting while driving is a leading cause of accidents and I just saw a mother who is pregnant, and was in the office with her 1 year old…she had just been involved in accident that totaled her car.  She was hit from behind by a teen who had been texting and never slowed down.  Fortunately both mother and child were buckled up and were not seriously injured.  If your child is found to be texting while they are driving you should have some serious consequences with both revoked driving privileges and no phone for a while. 

 

Lastly, this is a good month to remember to check your medicine cabinet and throw away any expired or unused medication.  There are some pharmacies that are having events where you can bring in expired medications and they will dispose of them properly. The number one place that  teens find drugs is in the home…keep all narcotics locked up and dispose of any unused medications!! I have had more than several parents who have told me that “drugs” had disappeared from their medicine cabinets after their own kids had had a lot of friends over…and who knows who may be “seeking” prescription medications. Locks on medicine cabinets and liquor cabinets are a must for families. 

What about taking a family first aid course at your local YMCA or Red Cross and spend a day getting your own family first aid kit together.  This is a great way to spend some time together and a productive activity. Have a fun and safe summer!!

Daily Dose

Teen Drivers

1:30 to read

As you know, when teens start to drive, I am a huge advocate for parent - teen driving contracts. I wrote my own contracts for my boys but I recently found a website that all parents who are getting ready to have teen drivers need to be aware of.

Injuries from motor vehicle crashes are the #1 cause of death for teens in the United States.  Studies have shown that having limits and boundaries in place for new drivers reduces the number of motor vehicle accidents that new drivers experience. Although not all states have “graduated driver’s licenses”, all parents can have discussions about the privilege and responsibility of driving and set their own guidelines for their new teen driver.

The website www.youngdriverparenting.org was developed by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and is an interactive site for both parent and teen.  The program is entitled “Checkpoints”.  The website includes teen driving statistics to help parents keep their teen drivers safe as well as giving information about state-specific teen driving laws.

The site has a great interactive component to help parents create their own parent-teen driving “contract” that addresses such things as teen driving hours, number of passengers allowed, and boundaries for driving. These parameters can be modified as the teen becomes more experienced and meets the “checkpoints” that were agreed to.  It is a great site as it not only gives you a template for the agreement, but sends emails as the allotted amount of time has passed for each step of the contract.  You don’t have to remember what you and your teen agreed to, they email you and then you and your child can revisit the agreement and expand it over time as your driver becomes more experienced.

Instead of handing out my “dog eared” old driving contracts that I wrote for my boys, I am now going to send my patients to this site (which is also being sustained by the American Academy of Pediatrics).  

Teen drivers whose parents are actively involved in monitoring their driving are not only less risky drivers but know ahead of time what their parent’s expectations are. Having a teen involved proactively with driving rules is far preferable to regretting that limits, boundaries and parental rules were not discussed prior to allowing your new driver on the road.

The website is not only free it is also evidence based, and within 5 - 10 minutes of reviewing the site a family is set to go with their own checkpoint agreement.  Here’s to teen driver safety!

Daily Dose

Swim Lessons Can Reduce Risk of Drowning

1:15 to read

Now that hot weather is with all of us, the issue of childhood drowning is an ever-present concern. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that after the age of five years, all children be taught to swim. The AAP does not recommend for or against swimming lessons as a measure to prevent drowning in children younger than five years. Between 2000 and 2005, 6,900 children died from non-boating accidental drowning. The rate of drowning was almost four times higher for children one to two years of age, and twice as high for those younger than five.

An article in Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine looked at the association between swimming lessons and risk of drowning specifically in the one to four year old age groups. Previous concerns had been raised about the potential for swimming lessons to increase the risk for drowning in younger children. This study provided good news that kids aged one to four who have taken formal swimming lessons have an 88% less risk of drowning. Researchers found that only three percent of the children who had drowned had taken swimming lessons. So with this news, it might be prudent to start swimming lessons at a younger age than previously thought.

But swimming lessons alone will not prevent drowning and even in this study, many of the older children who drowned were noted to have been proficient swimmers. It is still important to have other drowning prevention strategies in place including pool fencing (some parents with pools feel like their child will not be able to unlock a door and head to the pool and do not have a fence in place, and I totally disagree with that argument), constant and age appropriate adult supervision and training in CPR. Children are amazing at finding ways to unlock doors, and windows that lead outside and no parent can know where their child is for every minute of the day. If you have a pool and a child is missing always check the pool first, as a child can quietly slip into the water and lose consciousness in as little as two minutes and drown in five minutes.

That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow.

Your Child

Recall: MZB Children’s Watches Due to Rash, Chemical Burns

1:00

They are cute, keep time and appeal to children who want to own a watch. But, these watches have a defect that can expose children to serious skin irritations including chemical burns.

Nearly two million MZB Children’s “Light Up” Watches have been recalled because the case-back of the watch can detach and expose the interior to water posing a risk of skin irritation, redness, rashes or chemical burns.

This recall involves 303 styles of “Light Up” watches that are identified by style number. A complete list of the serial numbers is listed on the firm’s website http://www.regcen.com. The watches have a flexible plastic wristband sold in multiple colors including pink, pink with white snowflakes, green, blue and navy blue. “MZB” and the style number are printed on the case-back of the watches.

The firm has received 11 reports of skin irritations or chemical burns. Six of these consumers have required medical treatment.

The watches were sold at Kmart, Kohl’s, Walmart and other retailers nationwide from October 2012 through June 2015 for between $5 and $20.

Consumers should immediately take the recalled watches away from children and contact MZB for a refund.

MZB can be reached by calling their toll free number at (888) 770-7085 from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at www.mzb.com and click on Product Safety Notice tab at the top of the homepage for more information.

Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2015/MZB-Recalls-Childrens-Watches/

Parenting

Happy July 4th!

1:30

This July Fourth marks 240 years since the adoption of the Declaration of Independence and a new nation was formed. It’s one of the biggest and most commemorative holidays of the year. For many American families, the day will be celebrated with friends, flags, good food, parades, music, reunions, water play, fireworks displays and numerous other festive activities.

It’s a great day for patriotic fun with family and friends, but don’t forget about safety and the pets.

Food preparation, sun exposure, water activity, fireworks and our precious pets all require extra attention on this very special holiday!

Drink plenty of water and limit alcohol consumption- especially if children need looking after.

Protect against food poisoning by following these simple rules:

•       Clean: Make sure you clean all surfaces, utensils, and hands with soap and water.

•       Separate: When grilling, use separate plates and utensils for raw meat and cooked meat and ready-to-eat foods (like raw vegetables) to avoid cross-contamination.

•       Cook: Cook foods to the right temperature by using a food thermometer. That’s the only way to know it’s a safe temperature. Remember, burgers should be cooked to 160°F.

•        Chill: Chill raw and prepared foods promptly if not consuming after cooking. You shouldn’t leave food at room temperature for longer than two hours (or 1 hour if outdoor temperatures are above 90° F), so if you’re away from home, make sure you bring a cooler to store those leftovers.

Lots of families will be enjoying water activities at the beach or lake on July Fourth. Make sure your family plays it safe by:

•       Making sure the children – and even adults – always have a life jacket on when in the water or on a motorized water vehicle (boat, jet ski, etc.)

•       Never letting your children swim alone. An adult should always be present and paying attention.

•       Always stepping feet first into shallow water and never try to dive.

•       Reviewing safe boating practices.

•       Always having a phone handy should an emergency arise.

•       Knowing your limits when it comes to water.

Daylight hours are longer during the summer and the sun’s rays can be intense. If possible, limit your exposure to the sun between 10:00 am and 4:00 pm. Children are particularly susceptible to sunburn, so make sure they have plenty of sunscreen on. And once again, make sure you and the kids are drinking plenty of water! Watch for signs of heat stroke – rapid, weak pulse, fast, slow breathing, and hot, red skin.

Fireworks and the Fourth of July go hand-in-hand. The best way to protect the family from fireworks injuries is by attending a sponsored and controlled city or community fireworks event. Leave the explosions to the experts and enjoy the nighttime display!

If your city or county allows personal fireworks and you plan on having a few at the house, make sure safety is your first priority.

Fireworks can be dangerous, so in order to prevent injuries and deaths that are related to fireworks, here are a few firework safety tips to follow this Fourth of July:

·      Children should never be allowed to ignite or play with fireworks.

·      An adult should always be supervising firework activity.

·     A fire extinguisher, garden hose or bucket of water should always be on hand in the event of a mishap or fire.

·     No one should ever try to pick up or re-ignite a firework that did not ignite properly or fully the first time around.

·     Fireworks should only be lit one at a time and the person lighting them should immediately move away from the firework after lighting it.

And don’t forget about the four-legged family members! Pets don’t associate fireworks with celebrations and most are terrified of the loud explosions and whistles they produce.  Board or keep your pets indoors.

Make sure that lighter fluid and matches are out of your pet’s reach. While it’s tempting to feed your pets left over scraps, keep them on their regular diet. Keep citronella candles, insect coils and tiki torch oil products out of reach. These products can be poisonous to pets. And make sure that your pets have identification tags on them in case they escape. Having your pet chipped is inexpensive and provides a good way for owners to be tracked down in the event that a pet does run away.

July Fourth is a true American tradition. Here’s to having a fun and safe celebration!

Story sources: http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/general-pet-care/fourth-july-safety-tips

http://www.armymwr.com/july4th-safety.aspx

http://blogs.usda.gov/2012/07/02/four-food-safety-tips-for-the-fourth-how-to-protect-your-family-from-a-surprising-july-4th-danger/

 

 

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