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Your Child

Young Kids Still Being Injured or Killed in ATVs Accidents

2:30

Despite safety warnings from pediatricians and child health experts, children under 16 are still driving or riding as passengers on all-terrain vehicles.  The number of young kids being injured or killed in ATV accidents has not changed much in recent years, according to a new study.

Since 2000, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has recommended that ATV use be restricted to youth aged 16 years and older who wear helmets, don’t take passengers and steer clear of roads.

“Too many young children are driving these machines - equivalent to a motorcycle in many ways,” said senior study author Dr. William Hennrikus, medical director of the Pediatric Bone and Joint Clinic at Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, Pennsylvania. 

“Children should not drive an ATV until they’re over 16, just like driving a motorcycle,” Hennrikus said by email to Reuters. “Helmets should always be worn, just like a motorcycle.”

For the study, researchers examined data on 1,912 patients under age 18 who were injured while using an ATV and treated at trauma centers in Pennsylvania from 2004 to 2014. 

During this period, 28 children died in ATV crashes, a mortality rate of roughly one per every 100,000 kids in the population, researchers calculated.

Fewer than half of the children were wearing helmets and a street or roadway was were 15% of the crashes happened. Rural areas tend to have more ATV crashes.

Being a passenger or being pulled by the ATV was a factor in almost one in four injuries, the study also found. 

Half of the kids involved in ATV crashes were 14 or younger, and about 6 percent were no more than 5 years old. 

Boys accounted for three in every four patients.

Limitations of the study include the possibility that researchers underestimated injuries and deaths because they only looked at trauma center patients, not children who were treated elsewhere or died before they ever reached a trauma center.

Experts agree that age isn’t the only factor parents should consider when letting their child drive an ATV.

“Parents need to think not just about their child’s size, but also their ability to think, to react to emergency situations and to maintain safe, cautious control of a very powerful vehicle,” said David Schwebel, a sports injury researcher at the University of Alabama at Birmingham who wasn’t involved in the study.

All across the country children are riding on or driving ATVs with sometimes-serious consequences. Just in the past few months a 12-year old boy from New York died from injuries in an ATV crash. A 15-year old boy in Illinois was killed and his passenger, his 12-year old sister, was seriously injured when he lost control of the ATV. A 14-year old boy was killed in New Jersey after losing control and crashing his ATV into another 14-year olds ATV; 2 other children were seriously injured from that crash. None of the children were wearing helmets or seatbelts. 

“Helmets absolutely have to be used for any ride, even short, apparently safe ones,” Schwebel said by email. “Passengers should never ride on ATVs unless the ATV is designed for more than one person.”

While ATVs can be dangerous for adults, they pose a much higher risk for children.

“Children are not developmentally capable of operating these heavy, complex machines,” Sandra Hassink, president of the AAP, said. “The American Academy of Pediatrics warns all parents that no child under the age of 16 should drive or ride an ATV.”

Story source: Lisa Rapaport, http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-children-atv-injuries-idUSKBN1A422F

https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/pages/AAPCFAATVs.aspx

 

Your Baby

Gerber Recalls Two Batches of Organic Baby Foods

1:30

Gerber Products Company is voluntarily recalling specific Organic pouch products after identifying a packaging defect that may result in product spoilage during transport and handling.

The two kinds of Gerber Organic 2nd Foods Pouches being recalled are: Pears, Carrots and Peas and the other is Carrots, Apples and Mangoes, the company said.

“Consumers may notice that, in some cases, the pouches are bloated and product inside may have an off taste or odor. There have been three consumer reports of temporary gastrointestinal symptoms, however, we have been unable to confirm that these are related to the product. Consumers should not use the product, since it does not meet our high quality standards,” the company said in a statement.

The products were distributed at U.S. retailers nationwide and through on-line stores. Consumers who purchased pouches with UPCs, batch codes and expiration dates listed below, are encouraged to contact the Gerber Parents Resource Center at 1-800-706-0556 anytime day or night for a replacement coupon.

Replacement coupons are being offered for the following products:

GERBER® Organic 2ND FOODS® Pouches –Pears, Carrots & Peas, 3.5 ounce pouch UPC 15000074319

Best By dates/batch codes

•       12JUL2016 51945335XX

•       13JUL 2016 51955335XX

GERBER® Organic 2ND FOODS® Pouches- Carrots, Apples and Mangoes, 3.5 ounce pouch UPC 15000074395

Best By dates/batch codes

•       13JUL2016 51955335XX

•       14JUL2016 51965335XX

Consumers can also find more information on the Gerber Products Company website at https://www.gerber.com/recall-march-2016

Story source: http://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls/ucm492260.htm#recall-photos

Your Baby

How Safe is Your Baby’s Teething Ring?

1:30

Millions of American babies suck on teething rings to ease the discomfort of emerging teeth. Many of those rings contain banned chemicals that can be hazardous to their health, according to new study.

Researchers in the United States, who tested five-dozen baby teething rings, found all of them contained bisphenol-A (BPA) and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

Studies in animals have shown that endocrine disruptors interfere with hormones and cause developmental, reproductive and neurological harm, according to the study authors.

Labeling on the teething rings was deceptive, with most of the products characterized as BPA-free or non-toxic. All of them contained BPA, the study found. BPA is banned from children's drinking utensils in the United States and much of Europe.

BPA was not the only banned chemical found; the rings that were tested also contained parabens and the antimicrobial agents triclosan and triclocarban, which are also endocrine disruptors, the researchers said.

"The findings could be used to develop appropriate policies to protect infants from exposure to potentially toxic chemicals found in teethers," said study author Kurunthachalam Kannan and colleagues from the N.Y. State Department of Health's Wadsworth Center.

Because babies suck on teething rings, the presence of potentially harmful chemicals on the surface is concerning, the researchers said. The study authors said this is especially true since they found that BPA and other chemicals leached out of the rings into water.

The 59 teething rings analyzed were purchased online in the United States and tested for 26 potential endocrine-disrupting chemicals, the researchers said.

There are alternatives to teething rings. Frozen mini-bagels, wet washcloths, silicone toys and wooden spoons are just a few examples. Never leave your baby unattended with any of these alternatives. While they are very effective, you should make sure to keep an eye on your little one anytime they have something in their mouth.

The results of the study were published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Story source: Robert Preidt, https://consumer.healthday.com/environmental-health-information-12/chemical-health-news-730/is-that-baby-teether-safe-717512.html

 

 

Daily Dose

Car Seat Safety

1:30 to read

I recently received a text from a patient who asked if she could turn her 17 month old child’s car seat around and have it forward facing in the back seat. She said that her car seat instructions read “may forward face after the child weighs 20 lbs”.

 

Not long after that, another patient came in for her 18 month check up and during the course of the check up I always ask about car seat position.  I remind them that they should continue to have their child in a rear facing car-seat until they 2 years of age.  The child’s mother said that she had turned the car seat around to forward facing because the child “did not like rear facing”.  Interesting discussion with a toddler.

 

So, this just so happens to be Child Passenger Safety Week and National Car Seat Check Saturday as well. What a better time to remind parents that the safest way to restrain your child who is under the age of 2 years (depending on your carseat height and weight restrictions)  is in a rear facing car seat.  

 

In a recently published article in the journal Pediatrics, about 38% of 17-19 months olds were not following AAP recommendations to ride in a rear-facing car seat. The recommendations were changed in 2011 as studies found that young children in a forward-facing car seat were 5 times more likely to be seriously injured than those in a rear-facing seat. 

 

In the study many of the families involved who had their children forward-facing often said that they “thought their child was too tall or too heavy to be rear-facing”. Others commented that “their feet were touching the back seat and they looked uncomfortable”. 

 

Interestingly, your child has been in a rear-facing car seat since birth, so it is strange that they “prefer” to forward face.  Kind of like being in the middle seat of an airplane, if you have never been seated on the aisle you don’t know the difference in seats.

 

If you are concerned about the appropriate car seat for your child or how to install it, this is a good week to have a car seat expert help make sure that your child is riding in the safest car seat possible. If your child is under the age of 2…that also means rear facing!  

 

 

 

 

 

  

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Your Baby

CDC Warning: Dangerous Germ Found in Powdered Infant Formula

2:00

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a new warning about Cronobacter contamination in powdered infant formulas.

Because powdered infant formula is not sterile, it can sometimes contain Cronobacter — formerly known as Enterobacter sakazakii — a germ found naturally in the environment that can survive in very dry conditions, the CDC reports.

Cronobacter bacteria can cause severe blood infections or meningitis, an inflammation of the membranes that protect the brain and spine. If infected, infants two months of age and younger, are most likely to develop the infection.

Infants born prematurely and those with weakened immune systems are also at increased risk for serious sickness from Cronobacter, the CDC warns.

In infants, the sickness generally starts with fever and usually includes poor feeding, crying or very low energy. Very young infants with these symptoms should be taken to a doctor.

In some outbreak investigations, Cronobacter was found in powdered infant formula that had been contaminated in the factory. In other cases, Cronobacter might have contaminated the powdered infant formula after it was opened at home or elsewhere during preparation, according to the CDC.

Because Cronobacter lives in the general environment, it’s likely there have been other sources of this rare sickness.

Using current methods, manufacturers report that it is not possible to get rid of all germs in powdered infant formula in the factory. Powdered infant formula can also be contaminated after the containers are opened. Very young infants, infants born prematurely, and infants whose bodies have trouble fighting off germs are at highest risk.

The CDC offers these tips on protecting your infant:

·      Breastfeed: Breastfeeding helps prevent many kinds of sicknesses among infants. Almost no cases of Cronobacter sickness have been reported among infants who were being exclusively breastfed.

·      If your baby gets formula, choose infant formula sold in liquid form, especially when your baby is a newborn or very young. Liquid formulations are made to be sterile and therefore should not contain Cronobacter germs.

·      If you use powdered infant formula, follow these steps:

1      Clean up before preparation

Wash your hands with soap and water.

Clean bottles in a dishwasher with hot water and a heated drying cycle, or scrub bottles in hot, soapy water and then sterilize them.

Clean work surfaces, such as countertops and sinks.

2      Prepare safely

Keep powdered formula lids and scoops clean and be careful about what they touch.

Close containers of infant formula or bottled water as soon as possible.

Use hot water (158 degrees F/70 degrees C and above) to make formula.

Carefully shake, rather than stirring, formula in the bottle.

Cool formula to ensure it is not too hot before feeding your baby by running the prepared, capped bottle under cool water or placing it into an ice bath, taking care to keep the cooling water from getting into the bottle or on the nipple.

3      Use up quickly or store safely

Use formula within two hours of preparation. If the baby does not finish the entire bottle of formula, throw away the unused formula.

If you do not plan to use the prepared formula right away, refrigerate it immediately and use it within 24 hours. Refrigeration slows the growth of germs and increases safety.

When in doubt, throw it out. If you can’t remember how long you have kept formula in the refrigerator, it is safer to throw it out than to feed it to your baby.

Story Source: http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2016/04/125714/#.VyJvoat5ylA

 

Parenting

Have a Family Plan for Disasters

2:00

Would your family members know what to do if faced with a disaster?  Thousands of families learned the answer to that question with the recent hurricane catastrophes. 

"The biggest issue that we as first responders run into is that people fail to plan. Then things that could have been simple issues become big problems," said Scott Buchle, program manager for Penn State Health Life Lion EMS. The emergency service operates throughout south central Pennsylvania.

While hurricanes may be somewhat limited in their geographical impact, other types of disasters are far more common. Countless Americans live in areas prone to blizzards, wildfires, tornadoes or earthquakes. Even severe thunderstorms or ice storms can bring flash floods or widespread power outages. 

Having a plan on what to do if faced with any of these disasters can save lives, as well as lower the amount of anxiety and unpreparedness that comes with a natural or man-made calamity.

If you live in an area where the weather can challenge your safety, you should have enough water, non-perishable food, medications and a medication list, battery backups, a generator and other supplies to get through 48 to 72 hours, Buchle said in a Penn State news release.

Research your neighborhood and find out how close fire and police stations are.  Do you know in what direction you would need to go to find higher ground, where a tornado shelter is located or an emergency room? Is there a municipal building with a generator nearby?

Discuss and come up with a plan with your family the best way to respond during an emergency. Have a contact list of state and federal emergency agencies, and decide where you will meet up if separated.

You should also understand how your house is built and where you can go to be safe in case of flooding or a tornado. Many homes these days are “open concept” and don’t have sheltered inner rooms. Consider purchasing a tornado shelter if you live in areas prone to tornados.

"You also need to know who your emergency contacts are and the numbers," says Russell Knapp, supervisor of fire safety for the Penn State Health Medical Center campus.

What if you lose your cell phone – would you know the numbers off the top of your head? A laminated contact list that is in your wallet or purse is helpful to have when faced with an emergency.

It's also important to keep a current list of medications you take, the dosage, and how often you take each one, in case you have to seek safety in a shelter.

"You can give that [information] to people who can help you get the medicine you need," Buchle said.

People who use home medical equipment that requires electricity should consider what they would do if the power is out for several days. Plan ahead and if necessary have a generator and fuel on standby.

If you require medications that must be refrigerated, keep a cooler and ice packs on hand in case of power outages, these experts suggested.

Families with young children can also have a stash of diapers, formula, bottles, clean water and wipes ready to grab and run.

And don’t forget the pets. For many people, these animals are part of the family. Keep an adequate supply of pet food on hand and extra kitty litter.

In the middle of an emergency is not the time to try and find all these things. Have a separate location where your emergency supplies are located and in bags, ready to grab and leave with. Most of these supplies can be packed; medicines will need to be easily accessible.

Having an emergency plan that everyone is aware of in case of a disaster can help immensely when time is of the essence.

Story source: Robert Preidt, https://consumer.healthday.com/public-health-information-30/safety-and-public-health-news-585/how-would-your-family-weather-a-disaster-726589.html

Your Baby

Skip Hop recalls 130,000 Nightlight Soothers

1:45

Skip Hop makes adorable little nightlights that are often placed in infants and children’s bedrooms to help lull them to sleep. Two models of the popular nightlights are being recalled due to shock hazard.

This recall involves 130,000 of Skip Hop’s Moonlight & Melodies owl and elephant nightlight soothers that play melodies or nature sounds and project images. They have a USB wall power adapter and cord. The white and gray owl soothers measure about 5.5 by 4.5 by 6 inches. The white elephant soother measures about 7 x 4.2 x 5.7 inches. The soothers have a sound speaker on each side and operation buttons at the top or the back. The Skip Hop logo is on the underside of the soother.

Skip Hop is aware of reports that the power adapter can break, including one electrical shock incident.

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled nightlight soothers and contact Skip Hop for instructions on returning the USB wall power adapter with a prepaid shipping label and receive a free repair kit which includes a free USB wall adapter.

The Skip Hop products were sold at Babies R Us, Buy Buy Baby, Target and other retailers nationwide and online at Skiphop.com and Amazon.com from July 2016 through August 2017 for approximately $40.

Consumers can contact Skip Hop toll-free at 888-282-4674 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, email at recall@skiphop.com or online at www.skiphop.com and click on Product Recalls at the bottom of the page for more information.

Story source: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/Skip-Hop-Recalls-Nightlight-Soothers#

Daily Dose

Pool Safety

1:15 to read

As you know, water safety is paramont this time of year so I want to make sure your children are safe this summer.  Drowning is the leading cause of death for children between the ages of 1- 4 and the second leading cause of unintentional death for children under the age of 14.  Over 390 children die each year in their own backyard pools...tragically drowning is typically a SILENT event.

The first thing all pools need is a at least 4 foot tall fence surrounding all 4 sides of the pool. Now is the time to make sure that not only is your pool fenced but that it also is “tuned up” after the winter. That means that the self latching gate is working, that all pool furniture and toys are  moved away from the fence in order that children cannot climb up and over a fence, and you might even add a pool alarm that goes off if anyone enters the pool without supervision. 

If you have a door from the house to the pool there should be an alarm on the door as well as having a fence around the pool…this ensures “layers of protection”..the more layers to keep your child away from an unsupervised pool the better!  Children are clever, fast and tenacious.

Now once you decide to enjoy a day poolside you need to have several things on hand which include a portable phone, a flotation ring or hook, and always an adult within arms reach of a toddler or young child who has not yet learned to swim.  If there are several “non swimmers” in the pool with only 1 adult,  it is best to put all of the children in an approved flotation device as well.  The adult who is supervising the pool should ideally know CPR. I think that all “pool owners” should take CPR.

The person in charge of watching a child or children in the pool need to be identified and vigilant. That means staying off a cell phone or any electronics that might be distracting. It is also not the time for adults to be partying and alcohol is discouraged.  

Most children over the age of 4 years are ready for swimming lessons, but the AAP does recognize that there are some younger children between 1 -4 years who may be ready for swimming lessons, especially those that are frequently around water ( home pool, lake , beach). Each child will develop at differently.  Even a young child who has had swim lessons should not be considered “drown-proof” and never be unsupervised.

Lastly, don’t forget the sunscreen and remember to re-apply frequently to both you and your child!

 

 

 

   

Daily Dose

Baby Bling Can Be Dangerous!

1:15 to read

I recently saw a TV segment on “blinging” your baby and toddler. It seems that the latest craze is decking out not only little girls, but also little boys. Being the mother of three sons I can understand wanting to “dress up” boys as well (little boy clothes can be a bit boring) but a few of the models on TV were wearing necklaces. 

Now, a boy wearing a necklace doesn’t bother me at all, but a baby or toddler with a necklace worries me!  This isn’t about gender, rather about safety.  

A necklace is a real choking and strangling danger for babies and young children. I know that many parents receive necklaces for their babies on the occasion of a baptism and in some cultures an infant is given a necklace made of string or beads to wear soon after birth. 

But, whenever a baby comes into my office with a necklace on I discuss the possibility, even if remote, of the child suffocating if the necklace gets caught or twisted around the child’s neck. There is no reason to even risk it! 

Baby bling is great if you want to put your child in cute shirts, hats, or even trendy jeans. Go for it!  But I would never put a necklace on a child. It is akin to the adage about peanuts...when should a child be allowed to eat peanuts?  When they can spell the word!  

We pediatricians are no longer worried about peanut allergies in the young child, it is the choking hazard that is the real concern. It’s the same for a necklace. Let your child wear it when they can spell the word, or put it on when your 3 year old plays dress up, but take it off once finished. There is no need to ever have a young child sleep in anything like a necklace, or anything that has a cord until they are much older. 

Children ages 4 and under, and especially those under the age of 1 year, are at the greatest risk for airway obstruction and suffocation.  So, put the necklace back in the jewelry box for awhile. You can re-wrap for re-gifting and re-wearing at a later date. Safety before bling! 

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