Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Daily Dose

Vaccine Safety

The MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine and Varivax (chickenpox) vaccine have both been licensed and recommended for many years. These vaccines are typically given to children between the ages of 12-15 months, and then again between 4-5 years.

In 2005, a new vaccine was released which combined MMR and Varivax  (MMRV) which reduced the number of needle sticks a child would receive from their routine immunizations. Vaccine safety is always a paramount concern and even after a vaccine is FDA approved there continues to be “post licensing” monitoring of the vaccine, looking for any reported adverse events. After the release of MMRV in 2005, there were noted to be an increase in the number of febrile seizures occurring within 10 days of receiving the combination vaccine.  As a result, the use of this combination vaccine was suspended in 2008 and then resumed in early 2010. A study released in the July issue of Pediatrics now looks at the vaccine safety data that was accumulated on MMRV post licensure,  and analyzed data on over 459,000 children who had been vaccinated between 2000 and 2008. In the retrospective study, 83,000 children received MMRV and 376,000 with separate MMR and Varivax vaccines. The study found that children between the ages of 12–23 months have about double the risk of developing a febrile seizure 10 days after receiving MMRV than those children that received separate MMR and Varicella vaccines. MMRV vaccination was associated with an estimated 4.3 additional seizures per 10,000 doses during the 7–10 days post vaccine. As discussed in previous blogs, febrile seizures are fairly common and are typically harmless to a child, but cause a lot of anxiety and fear for parents.  (my own son had a febrile seizure as a toddler).  The American Academy of Pediatrics endorses the use of single or combination vaccine for MMR and Varivax. The fact that there may be a greater likelihood (albeit small) for a child to develop a febrile seizure post MMRV vaccination needs to be discussed with parents as there is not going to be a “right” answer as to vaccine preference. Some parents would prefer minimize needle sticks and would opt to receive MMRV, while others would prefer to have MMR and Varivax given separately to minimize any risk of  an adverse event. Due to the fact that the increased seizure risk was seen in children between 12-23 months, one might advocate to use the separate vaccines for the initial series and the combination vaccine in the older child (who would probably vote to get one less STICK). Protecting against measles, mumps, rubella and chickenpox is the most important issue at hand.  Discuss the pros and cons of the combination vaccine with your own doctor, but be reassured that vaccines are continually being monitored for safety as well as efficacy. That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue.

Daily Dose

Water Safety

1:15 to read

I was reminded of the importance of pool safety after watching the news and hearing that 3 children were found in a nearby apartment pool, under water and unresponsive.  

There are about 3,500 fatal unintentional drownings per year, which is about 10 deaths per day.  Drowning is the second leading cause of death in children ages 1-14 years.  For every child who dies from drowning, there are 4 non-fatal drowning victims who suffer severe and life changing injuries.

Drowning is preventable!!  Although many people think of drowning victims screaming and yelling, drowning is actually quick and silent.  It only takes seconds (the time to grab a towel, or answer the phone) and a child may become submerged. Most drownings also occur in family pools.  Because I have always had a fear of drowning we did not build a pool until our boys were all older than 10 years and were excellent swimmers ( was I a bit over zealous with swim lessons and swim team, maybe...)?  Children as young as 2-3 years can safely begin swim lessons and begin the process of mastering how to tread water, floating and basic swim strokes. 

Another rule for safe swimming is “never swim alone!”.  Teach your children the importance of the buddy system when they are swimming, even in a backyard pool. Adults need to be designated “water watchers” and know that they are responsible for watching the children in the pool and will never leave them unattended. The “water watcher” should regularly scan the bottom of the pool, and will need to have a phone at the pool for emergency use only.  Adult water watchers have only 1 job...to watch the pool, no poolside chatting or distractions. It is a big job!

Anyone with a pool or who is a caregiver of children who are swimming needs to become CPR certified.  CPR skills can save lives and prevent brain damage.   

Lastly, if you have a pool you need layers of protection - which  means a barrier around your pool. I have heard many a family tell me that their child “could never get out the door to the pool, it has several locks and an alarm”.  Despite the best of intentions, no parent can watch their child 24 hours/day.  Toddlers have been known to push a stool over to unlock a door, or a door is inadvertently left unlocked or ajar. Remember, it only takes seconds for a child to become submerged. 

By the way, I am following my own advice and a pool fence is going up to protect our granddaughter...the bigger the better.

Daily Dose

Pay Attention Around The Pool

With summer heat spread across the country, many families seek relief by a pool. The first thing to think of is safety!With the summer heat enveloping the entire country, it certainly is time for trips to the pool.  The first thing that comes to my mind when I think of swimming pools is safety!!

Knowing that over 900 children between the ages of 1–14 years die each year from drowning,  the discussion of water safety is a necessary part of summer.  Astoundingly, reports show that 9 out of 10 of those children who drowned were “under supervision”. The AAP has recently endorsed allowing children between the ages of 1-4 to take swimming lessons. It was previously thought that encouraging swimming lessons for children under the age of 4 years might actually contribute to increased drowning. In fact, recent studies have suggested that children ages 1–4 may be less likely to drown if they have had formal swimming instruction. The AAP has not gone so far as to routinely recommend mandatory swimming lessons for this age group, but does endorse swimming lessons in younger children who are frequently exposed to water and are emotionally and physically able to participate. Just as with any childhood milestone, different children will become more adept swimmers at different ages.  The AAP does not recommend formal “infant survival swimming lessons” for children under the age of 1 year. I have heard many parents discuss infant swimming classes and I believe that parent- child pool time is great, but infant survival swimming has not been proven to be beneficial. The AAP continues to recommend that most children ages 4 and older should learn to swim.  Swimming is a life skill that everyone should attempt to master, just like jumping rope, riding a bike and swinging. When I am discussing water safety with my patients and families, I emphasize that drowning continues to be the second leading cause of death for children ages 1–19.  Because I practice in Texas, many families have a backyard pool of some sort, whether it be in ground, above ground or even a very large portable inflatable pool. All of these pose the risk of drowning. I often have interesting discussions with parents who have a backyard pool who do not believe that it is necessary to have a barrier around the pool. They will say, “we never let our child outside alone” or “he or she is always being supervised by an adult”.  As you might expect, these are usually first time parents who have yet to experience the cunningness of a toddler. Just as our children watch us and learn how to feed themselves, or drink from a cup or climb out of a bed, they too watch us open a door, or take a stool out to reach something. A toddler is more than capable or figuring out how to reach a door handle even with a lock, or climb out a window to go outside and head straight for the pool. Drowning is also SILENT!!  It is not like the movies with screaming and yelling. The child quietly goes beneath the water and sinks.  It only takes minutes and the consequences of drowning are devastating. Even for a child who is found and resuscitated there may be a life-long brain injury and the worst case scenario, death.  All families with a pool should install a 4 sided fence that is at least 4 feet high to limit pool access. It must be difficult to climb and have a self-latching, self-closing gate. The arguments I hear about “landscape aesthetics” fall on deaf ears. Every family should also know CPR. So sign your child up for swimming lessons, and have fun practicing flutter kicks and arm strokes. Just do it with an adult within arm’s reach of all new and novice swimmers and a fence around the pool! That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue!

Your Baby

Recall: Otteroo Baby Floats Due to Drowning Risks

1:00

Babies and young children can drown in less than 2 inches of water.  That’s why it is  vital that parents and caregivers never leave a baby or young child unattended while they are near or in water.

When bathing their infant, parents will sometimes attach a bath float to their child to help keep his or her head above water. While the float may offer some assistance, critics warn that the device can give parents a false sense of security that their child is protected from drowning.

Otteroo Corporation makes inflatable baby floats that are specifically designed for babies 8 weeks and up.

The company is recalling about 3000 units of their inflatable Baby Floats after receiving 54 reports of broken seems on the product. No injuries have been reported.

The Otteroo Inflatable Baby Float is an inflatable round ring made of clear and blue plastic material. It has two air chambers that fasten around a baby’s neck with a white buckle. The floats have a chin rest, two handles and two circular openings on the back of the ring to allow the device to expand as the child grows with age. There are three colorful balls that move freely around inside the ring.  The name “Otteroo” is imprinted on the top of the float in large, orange letters with an Otter logo.

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled inflatable baby floats and contact the firm to receive a free replacement.

The floats were sold online at Otteroo.com and Amazon.com and Zulily.com from January 2014 through July 2014 for about $35.

Consumers can contact Otteroo Corporation at (415) 236-5388 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. PT Monday through Friday or online www.otteroo.com and click on “Safety” at the bottom of the page for more information.

According to their website, Otteroo is offering a free replacement for those who purchased the product manufactured in 2014 (NO: 002013001).

Sources: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/Recall-Alerts/2015/Otteroo-Corp-Recalls-Inflatable-Baby-Floats/

http://otteroo.com/pages/safety-info

Your Child

Zip Line Injuries Soaring

2:00

There’s definitely something thrilling about standing high above the ground, hooking oneself onto a pulley and launching off the edge of safety, then soaring through the air on a steel cable. It’s called zip lining.

A new study finds, as the adventure sport’s popularity has increased, so have associated injuries requiring treatment at an emergency room.

Researchers found the injury rate from zip lines rose by more than 50 percent between 2009 and 2012, with kids 9 and under accounting for 45 percent of the injuries.

"One of the things that really struck us about this study is how serious the injuries were. Almost 50 percent of them were fractures or broken bones, and over 10 percent actually had to be admitted to the hospital," said Tracy Mehan of Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, who led the study.

"These are much higher and more serious injuries than we see with a lot of studies, and it shows us that this activity is much more like an adventure sport," Mehan told NBC News.

Mehan and her team looked at a national database of emergency room visits. They found that since 1997, close to 17,000 people have been injured badly enough from zip line activities to need care from an emergency room.

There were not enough annual cases until 2009 — when zip lines really began to be popular — to put a good, solid rate on the number of injuries.

"Seventy percent of them were in the last four years, which shows us that this is a growing trend," Mehan said. "In fact, in 2012 alone, there were over 3,600 injuries, which was about 10 a day."

What was once an adventure only found in a remote part of the world has become big business in rural areas and suburbs throughout the country.  If you have the space, you can even buy a kit and assemble a zip line in your own backyard.  What could possibly go wrong?

"In 2001 there were about 10 commercial zip line outfits in the United States," Mehan said. "By 2012 this had grown to over 200. And when you add in all of the publicly accessible zip lines that you see now, it's over 13,000."

Most of the injuries happened when people fell off or crashed into something like a tree or a zip line structure.

"The injuries really happen when you fell off the zip line from a high height, or when you went careening into a tree at a high speed or a support structure and had a collision. Those types of injuries are very serious," she said.

"The most common injury by far that we see are broken bones. That was almost 50 percent of our injuries. Other injuries can be bruises, sprains and strains, or concussions."

Head injuries account for 7 percent of the hospital visits says Mehan, and wearing a helmet doesn’t guarantee your head will be protected. A fall from a short height can damage the head and neck, even with a helmet.

While zip line popularity may be increasing, safety standards are pretty much non- existent says Mehan.

"I think a lot of families assume that if there is a zip line out there, that it is following industry safety standards and it's being kept up and maintained in a way that is safe, but that's not always the case," she said.

"Not a lot of states actually have standards in place. Some do, some don't, and even among those that do, it can even vary among jurisdiction," she added.

"We would like to see one universal set of safety standards adopted by each state."

When 12-year-old, Bonnie Sanders Burney, fell to her death in a zip line accident in North Carolina this year, the state’s General Assembly quickly passed a law requiring research for possible regulations. While some states have codified regulations, others allow operators of zip lines and high ropes courses to self-regulate.

Mehan and her team hope the information from this study will spur a tougher look at creating a national code of safety regulations pertaining to zip lines.

Source: Maggie Fox and Erika Edwards, http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/zipline-injuries-soar-study-finds-n438876

 

 

 

Your Baby

Gerber Recalls Two Batches of Organic Baby Foods

1:30

Gerber Products Company is voluntarily recalling specific Organic pouch products after identifying a packaging defect that may result in product spoilage during transport and handling.

The two kinds of Gerber Organic 2nd Foods Pouches being recalled are: Pears, Carrots and Peas and the other is Carrots, Apples and Mangoes, the company said.

“Consumers may notice that, in some cases, the pouches are bloated and product inside may have an off taste or odor. There have been three consumer reports of temporary gastrointestinal symptoms, however, we have been unable to confirm that these are related to the product. Consumers should not use the product, since it does not meet our high quality standards,” the company said in a statement.

The products were distributed at U.S. retailers nationwide and through on-line stores. Consumers who purchased pouches with UPCs, batch codes and expiration dates listed below, are encouraged to contact the Gerber Parents Resource Center at 1-800-706-0556 anytime day or night for a replacement coupon.

Replacement coupons are being offered for the following products:

GERBER® Organic 2ND FOODS® Pouches –Pears, Carrots & Peas, 3.5 ounce pouch UPC 15000074319

Best By dates/batch codes

•       12JUL2016 51945335XX

•       13JUL 2016 51955335XX

GERBER® Organic 2ND FOODS® Pouches- Carrots, Apples and Mangoes, 3.5 ounce pouch UPC 15000074395

Best By dates/batch codes

•       13JUL2016 51955335XX

•       14JUL2016 51965335XX

Consumers can also find more information on the Gerber Products Company website at https://www.gerber.com/recall-march-2016

Story source: http://www.fda.gov/safety/recalls/ucm492260.htm#recall-photos

Play
431 views in 2 months
July 4th

Have a safe & fun July 4th!

Your Baby

“Hard” Tap Water and Eczema in Infants

1:30

Previous studies have noted an association between “hard” tap water and eczema in schoolchildren, but a new study out of the U.K. suggests it may be linked to eczema in babies as well.

Water described as “hard” contains a high degree of minerals - specifically calcium, magnesium and manganese. It’s not considered hazardous, but it comes with a variety of unpleasant effects such as soap scum in sinks and bathtubs, spots on dishes and shower glass, clogged pipes from buildup and clothes that are left dingy after washing.

By some accounts, 85% of U.S. households have hard water.

If your child has eczema, then you know that it is a chronic condition marked by itchiness and rashes. It typically starts at about 6 months old and can last into adulthood.

The study included 1,300 3-month old infants from across the United Kingdom. Researchers checked hardness -- the water's mineral content -- and chlorine levels in the water supply where the babies lived.

Babies who lived in areas with hard water were up to 87% more likely to have eczema, the study found.

"Our study builds on growing evidence of a link between exposure to hard water and the risk of developing eczema in childhood," said lead author Dr. Carsten Flohr, from the Institute of Dermatology at King's College London.

One way to change the composition of hard water is by adding a water softener system to your household

There are several types of systems including salt-based Ion exchange softeners, salt-free softeners, dual tank and magnetic water softeners plus others.

While the other studies focused on school aged children, this is the first to look at the connection with eczema, hard water and babies, the researchers said.

The study wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship, so further research is needed to learn more about this apparent link, Flohr added.

"We are about to launch a feasibility trial to assess whether installing a water softener in the homes of high-risk children around the time of birth may reduce the risk of eczema and whether reducing chlorine levels brings any additional benefits," Flohr said in a college news release.

The study was published recently in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

Story sources: Robert Preidt, https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159150.html

http://extoxnet.orst.edu/faqs/safedrink/hard.htm

 

 

Your Child

Lawn Mower Safety Rules Haven’t Prevented Kid's Injuries

2:00

Spring, summer and fall are the times of year when you are most likely to hear the monotonous hum of mower blades echoing throughout neighborhoods.

It’s often the first job a young boy or girl acquires to earn a little extra money, but lawn mowing can come with high risk of injuries when kids and parents don’t follow some simple guidelines.

Despite recommendations presented by AAP, the incidence of lawn mower-related injuries in children has remained unchanged over the last two to three decades.

From 2004-’13, an average of 9,351 youths ages 20 years and younger suffered lawn mower-related injuries each year, according to a review of data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

About one-third of the wounds occurred in children younger than 12. Two age groups sustained the most injuries, 3 years old and 16 years old and predominately male.

Areas of the body most commonly injured involved hand/fingers ((30%), lower extremity (17%) and face/eye (14%). Amputations and fractures combined accounted for 12.5% of injuries and were more likely to require hospitalization.

Although the incidence of injuries caused by ride-on mowers was 2.5 times higher than those caused by walk-behind mowers, the type of mower was not specified in over 70% of cases, making a true determination of relative risk nearly impossible.   

While fractures and amputations are the most dramatic injuries, they certainly are not the only ones reported. An analysis of NEISS data from 1990-2004 showed the majority of lawn mower injuries were cuts, other soft-tissue injuries and burns.

Also reported in the study were foreign body injuries. It’s hard to imagine, but the rotation of the blades on a typical 26-inch riding lawn mower is similar to the energy required to fire a bullet through the engine block of an automobile, according to the authors. The force certainly is enough to impale objects into a child’s body, even from a good distance away.  

The AAP warns that kids and parents should be aware of the precautions one should take before and during mowing to keep everyone safer.

Here are some mower-safety tips from the AAP:

•       Before learning how to mow the lawn, your child should show the maturity, good judgment, strength and coordination that the job requires. Kids should be at least 12 years of age to operate a walk-behind power mower or hand mower safely and 16 years of age to operate a riding lawn mower safely.

•       Children should be supervised until you are sure he or she can handle the job alone.

•       Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes with slip-proof soles, close-fitting clothes, safety goggles or glasses with side shields, and hearing protection.

•       Watch for objects that could be picked up and thrown by the mower blades, as well as hidden dangers. Tall grass can hide objects, holes or bumps. Use caution when approaching corners, trees or anything that might block your view.

•       If the mower strikes an object, stop, turn the mower off, and inspect the mower. If it is damaged, do not use it until it has been repaired.

•       Do not pull the mower backwards or mow in reverse unless absolutely necessary, and carefully look for children behind you when you mow in reverse.

•       Use extra caution when mowing a slope.

•       When a walk-behind mower is used, mow across the face of slopes, not up and down, to avoid slipping under the mower and into the blades.

•       With a riding mower, mow up and down slopes, not across, to avoid tipping over.

•       Keep in mind that lawn trimmers also can throw objects at high speed.

•       Remain aware of where children are and do not allow them near the area where you are working. Children tend to be attracted to mowers in use.

Stop the engine and allow it to cool before refueling. Always turn off the mower and wait for the blades to stop completely before:

•       Crossing gravel paths, roads or other areas

•       Removing the grass catcher

•       Unclogging the discharge chute

•       Walking away from the mower

Some of the most heartbreaking accidents occur when small children – even infants- are allowed to “ride along” while their parents or grandparents are using a riding mower or small tractor.  U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission statistics show that each year, 800 children are run over by riding mowers or small tractors and more than 600 of those incidents result in amputation; 75 people are killed, and 20,000 injured; one in five deaths involves a child. For children under age 10, major limb loss is most commonly caused by lawn mowers. Never allow a child on a lawn mower or small tractor while you’re using it.

Mowing can be fun, a good source of income for adolescents and a help to families; so make sure to give an ounce of prevention to avoid having to receive a pound of cure.  

Story sources: http://www.aappublications.org/news/2016/08/11/LawnMowers081116

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-home/Pages/Lawnmower-Safety.aspx

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

Why do some kids have birthmarks?

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.