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Your Child

Safety Recalls: Finger Paints, Baby Bathtubs, Strollers and More

2:00

The American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) online Gateway issue has listed several children’s products that have been recalled due to health and safety concerns.

The list includes

·      Sargent Art tempera finger paints, Lil’ Luxuries Whirlpool, Bubbling Spa & Shower

·      Peg Perego’s 850 Polaris Sportsman ATV-style ride on toy

·      Mamas & Papas’ Armadillo Flip and Armadillo Flip XT strollers

·      Fiddle Diddles LullaBelay adjustable car seat strap system

·      Chimparoo brand Trek baby carriers

Sargent Art tempera finger paints: About 2.8 million units of paint have been recalled. The paint can contain harmful bacteria, putting children with weak immune systems at risk of serious illness. Those with healthy immune systems may not be affected.

Recalled are 13 types of Sargent Art tempera and finger paints. All colors and sizes of the following types of paints are recalled: Art-Time brand of tempera paint, washable finger paint, washable fluorescent finger paint, washable fluorescent tempera paint, washable glitter finger paint, washable paint and fluorescent tempera paint.

Sold at: Hobby Lobby, Wal-Mart and other stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com and ShopSargentArt.com from May 2015 to June 2016 for $1 to $8.

Stop using the paints and contact the company for a refund at 800-827-8081 or visit www.sargentart.com.

Lil’ Luxuries Whirlpool, Bubbling Spa & Shower: About 86,000 units have been recalled. Fabric slings can come off the infant bathtubs, and infants can fall or drown.

Lil’ Luxuries Whirlpool, Bubbling Spa & Shower is a battery-operated whirlpool bath with motorized jets intended for use with children from birth to 2 years. The product has a fabric sling on a plastic frame onto which the infant is placed for bathing. The fabric sling on the tub does not have a white plastic clip to attach the headrest area of the fabric sling to the plastic frame. Recalled bathtubs have numbers 18840, 18850, 18863 or 18873 with date codes starting with 1210, 1211, 1212, 1301, 1302, 1303, 1304, 1305, 1306, 1307 or 1308, which stand for the two-digit year followed by the two-digit month, on the fabric sling.

The products were sold at Toys R Us/Babies R Us and other juvenile product specialty stores nationwide from October 2012 through October 2013 for about $60. The tubs also might have been sold secondhand.

Stop using the fabric sling in the tub, and contact the company for a replacement sling with a white plastic attachment clip. You can call 844-612-4254 or visit http://bit.ly/2f1wQNG.

Peg Perego’s 850 Polaris Sportsman ATV-style ride on toy, About 3,000 toys were recalled. A relay on the circuit board can fail causing the vehicle’s motor to overheat and catch fire.

Recalled are Peg Perego’s 850 Polaris Sportsman ride-on, 24-volt battery-operated toy vehicles for children ages 5 to 7 years. The ATV-style vehicles for two people are silver, red and black and have four wheels, a flip-up backrest for the back passenger and a front and rear luggage rack. Vehicles with date codes 651016, 651017, 651020, 651021, 651022, 651023, 651024, 651027, 651028, 651029, 651030, 660304, 660305, 661123, 661124, 661125 and 661130 are recalled. The date code is under the vehicle seat. Sportsman Twin and 850 EFI are printed on the side and Polaris is on the side of the seat.

Items were sold at online retailers including Amazon.com, Cabelas.com, Target.com, ToysRUs.com and Walmart.com from October 2014 through April 2016 for $500 to $600.

Remedy is to Contact Peg Perego for a replacement circuit board with instructions, including shipping. Call 877-737-3464, email 850recall@pegperego.com or visit https://us.pegperego.com/cs/recalls/.

Mamas & Papas’ Armadillo Flip and Armadillo Flip XT strollers: About 3,000 strollers have been recalled. A loose latch on the stroller can cause the infant in the seat to tip back unexpectedly and possibly fall out when facing the parent.

Recalled are Mamas & Papas’ Armadillo Flip and Armadillo Flip XT strollers. All models are folding strollers for one infant. They come in black, teal and navy and weigh about 22 pounds. Lot number ranges for recalled Armadillo Flip strollers are 00814 through 00416. Lot number ranges for the Flip XT are 01214 through 00416. The number is printed on the sewn-in label on the stroller.

Strollers were sold at Albee Baby, Babies ‘R’ Us, Buy Buy Baby and other stores nationwide and online at www.mamasandpapas.com and www.amazon.com from December 2014 through July 2016 for $500.

Stop using the strollers and contact the company for a repair at 800-309-6312 or visit www.mamasandpapas.com/us.

Fiddle Diddles LullaBelay adjustable car seat strap system: About 250 units have been recalled. The carabiners attached to the strap system have small parts inside that can come loose and be swallowed and choked on by young children.

The Fiddle Diddles LullaBelay adjustable car seat strap system with model number LB1001 includes two fabric straps, carabiner hardware, a mesh car seat cover and a tote bag. The carabiners are used to hang a car seat from a shopping cart. The model number is printed on the straps.

They were sold at Amazon.com from November 2015 through June 2016 and Fiddlediddles.com from May through June 2015 and at Zoolikins stores in Arizona from November 2015 through June 2016 for about $40.

You can contact the company for a repair kit with three new carabiners. Call 888-741-2957, email info@fiddlediddles.com or visit http://fiddlediddles.com/replacement-kit.html.

Chimparoo brand Trek baby carriers: About 130 units are being recalled. The carriers’ side strap can loosen unexpectedly from the buckle, and the child can fall out.

Recalled are Chimparoo brand Trek baby carriers that allow the user to carry a baby tummy to tummy, on the hip or on the back. The 100% twill fabric carriers were sold in 18 solid, striped and pattern color combinations. The carriers attach to the wearer’s body with adjustable straps made of polypropylene webbing and plastic buckles. “Chimparoo” is printed on the upper right hand corner of the carrier. “Trek” is embroidered on the belt.

The carriers were sold at Children’s boutique stores, such as Granola Babies, of Costa Mesa, Calif., Eat/Sleep/Play, of Summerville, S.C., and Top to Bottom, of Omaha, Neb., and online at www.Amazon.com and www.Chimaparoo.ca from May through July 2016 for about $170.

Contact the company for a replacement buckle for the baby carrier’s side-buckle. Call 855-289-5343, email safety@Chimparoo.com or visit www.Chimparoo.ca/en/recall.

Story source: Trisha Korioth, at http://www.aappublications.org/news/2016/11/17/HealthAlerts111716

Daily Dose

Giving Your Child Medicine

1:15 to read

Since I recently wrote an article about teaching young children to swallow pills, here is another reason to teach this to children sooner than later. The American Academy of Pediatrics has a new policy statement encouraging parents, physicians and pharmacists to use only metric measurements on prescriptions,medication labels and dosing cups to ensure that kids receive the correct dose of medication.

In other words, no measuring medications with teaspoons or tablespoons and especially not the ones in the cereal drawer.  Because spoons come in many sizes, they are not precise enough to measure a child’s medication.  For infants, toddlers and young children, a small error in dosing, especially if repeated for many doses, may be toxic.  

These recommendations also mean that doctors, like myself, need to prescribe medications in metric units like milliliters rather than teaspoons. We also need to instruct parents to use metric dosing devices, and not any measuring devices that have confusing markings with both teaspoons, tablespoons and milliliters. The medication should also come with an appropriate sized dosing device to avoid the possibility of two and three fold dosing errors.

The recommendations also call for manufacturers of over the counter medications to eliminate labeling, instructions and dosing devices that contain units other than metric units...no more 1 teaspoon, but rather 5 milliliters.

I am going to make a conscious effort to make sure that I am now writing my prescriptions with the correct units and help make dosing errors less of a problem and all medications safer for my “little” patients.

No more kitchen spoons!!!

Your Teen

Websites May Encourage Self-Injury

1.45 to read

The videos may be a focus for communities of youth in which self-injury is encouraged and viewed as normal and exciting, which could potentially increase the risk for self-injury.Some at-risk teens are finding new ways to hurt themselves thanks to a popular website with videos that glorify self-injury.

Young adults and teens may believe that hurting themselves is normal and acceptable after watching videos and other media on Web-sharing sites like YouTube, new research indicates. The findings, published in the journal Pediatrics, warn professionals and parents to be aware of the availability and dangers of such material for at-risk teens and young adults. Deliberate self-injury without the intent of committing suicide is called “non-suicidal self-injury” or NSSI. An estimated 14% to 24% of youth and young adults engage in this destructive behavior, according to the study. NSSI can also include relationship challenges, mental health symptoms, and risk for suicide and death, the study noted. Common forms of self-injury include cutting, burning, picking and embedding objects to cause pain or harm. While other studies have looked at the availability of online information about self-injury, the authors focused on the scope of self-injury in videos uploaded on YouTube and watched by youth. They described their work as the first such study and noted that their findings could be relevant in risk, prevention and managing self-injury. The authors focused on YouTube because, according to the site, since its inception in 2005 “YouTube is the world's most popular online video community, allowing millions of people to discover, watch and share originally-created videos.” Using the site’s search function the researchers looked for the terms “self-harm” and “self-injury,” identifying the site’s top 50 viewed videos containing a live person, and the top 50 viewed videos with words and photos or visual elements. The top 100 items that the study focused on were viewed over 2 million times, according to the analysis, and most – 80% - were available to a general audience. The analysis of the self-injury content found that 53% was delivered in a factual or educational tone, while 51% was delivered in a melancholic tone. Pictures and videos commonly showed explicit demonstrations of the self-harming behavior. Cutting was the most common type of behavior; more than half of the videos did not contain warnings about the graphic nature of the behavior. The average age of uploaders of the self-injury material was 25.39 years, according to the findings, and 95% were female. The authors surmise that the actual average age is probably younger because many YouTube users say they are older in order to access more content. The study concludes that the findings about the volume and nature of self-injury content on YouTube show "an alarming new trend among youth and young adults and a significant issue for researchers and mental health workers." The videos may be a focus for communities of youth in which self-injury is encouraged and viewed as normal and exciting, which could potentially increase the  risk for self-injury. The study warns that health professionals need to be aware of this type and source of content, and to inquire about it when working with youth who practice self-injury because sites like YouTube can reach youth who may not openly discuss their  behavior. Self-harming is not typical behavior for otherwise untroubled teens and young adults, explained Dr. Charles Raison, an Emory University psychiatrist and CNNHealth.com's mental health expert. It’s an action that kids with psychiatric problems may try. “NSSI is a young person’s affliction…one in ten will kill themselves," he said.   "A lot of people will outgrow the behavior.” Raison said that it’s common for troubled young people to share information about hurting themselves. Treatments can include antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs and psychotherapy.

Your Child

Talking to Your Child About Tragic News Events

2:00

Another tragedy has taken place, this time a terrorist attack in Paris, France.  Children, adolescents and adults have lost their lives or been seriously injured while out for an evening of fun, errands or romance.  Media outlets have been covering the events, sometimes showing graphic video or photos from the bloody scenes.

When children view these images or hear the stories, they can become scared and worried that the same thing will happen to them. 

Whenever catastrophic local, national or global events take place, it’s easy to assume that your child doesn’t really know what is going on or understand the gravity. But, in this age of instant and abundant information, they most likely do. Children are very sensitive to their parents and friends’ feelings. They are more tuned in than you might think.

Children sense when their parents are really worried, whether they're watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a crisis, it's especially disconcerting for them to realize that their parents are scared, angry or shocked.

When bad things happen, children want to know what is going on.  It doesn’t have to be an international event. Local tragedies such as a flood, tornado, shooting, kidnapping, suicide, house fire or car wreck can be more frightening to children than events taking place across the world or in another state.

So, how do you talk with your child about such unhappy and threatening things? I’ve turned to Mr. Rogers to share with you his calming and thoughtful insights. The first time he addressed this topic was after Robert Kennedy’s assassination. Parents and educators turned to him for guidance then and his advice still holds true today.

In times of crisis, children want to know, "Who will take care of me?" They're dependent on adults for their survival and security. They're naturally self-centered. Their world is small and their life experience is limited. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to know that people in the government, in their community and in the world, and other people they don't even know, are working hard to keep them safe, too.

One of the ways young children express feelings is through play. However, sometimes events that happen are violent, so parents need to be nearby to redirect play if it takes a turn in that direction. More nurturing play can help children process the different activities and needs that happen around certain types of events. Play involving being a doctor or nurse in a hospital setting or creating a pretend meal for emergency workers or families can help children understand that there are good people and helpful actions that also take place when something bad happens.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet accidents may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as we adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children can experience a more calming sense of security.

When shocking event happens, it’s easy to get drawn into watching the news for hours and hours. Think back to 9-11 when there was non-stop coverage for days with repeated video of the towers being hit and falling. It created post-traumatic stress disorder, nation-wide. As hard as it is for adults to assimilate, it’s even harder for children. Once you have the information, turn the TV off or find something else for your kids to watch. Monitor their online activity as well to see if they are seeing too much graphic information or too many stories of “What if this happened here?”

Exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed, feelings that even young children can sense. We help our children-and ourselves-if we're able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them-away from the frightening images on the screen.

Limiting our child’s media exposure doesn’t mean we don’t talk about what has happened with them.

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If very young children ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, "What do you think happened?" If the answer is, "I don't know," then the simplest reply might be something like, "I'm sad about the news, and I'm worried. But I love you, and I'll take care of you."

If we don't let children know it's okay to feel sad and scared, they may try to hide those feelings or think something is wrong with them whenever they do feel that way. They certainly don't need details of what's making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Your child’s age and emotional IQ should be your guide on how much detail you go into when discussing tragic events. Very young children do not need a lot of detail. Children 7 and under are most concerned with safety. They need to know that you and they are secure. That’s why it important to keep the TV at a minimum for kids in this age group. They can identify strongly to pictures of other young children in peril or crying because they’ve lost someone dear to them. At this age, kids are most concerned with separation from you.  Assure them that you are watching out for them and will protect them.

Children between the ages of 8 and 12 will often notice the morality of events.  You may have to explain the basics of prejudice, bias, and civil and religious strife. But be careful about making generalizations, since kids will take you at your word. This is a good time to ask them what they know, since they'll probably have gotten their information from friends, and you may have to correct facts. This age group will most likely be online more. While it’s still important to keep news viewing under control, online viewing and searching should be monitored as well. It’s a good age to discuss lots of views and opinions about events. Read stories together and then ask them what they think.

Teens will probably get their news independently of you. Talking to them can offer great insights into their developing senses of justice and morality. It will also give you the opportunity to throw your own insights into the mix, but don’t dismiss their opinions or insights just because they may not be the same as yours. They will shut down communication quickly if they feel their ideas are not being valued.  Discuss the ways that different media covers events. Again, ask them what they think.

Having to discuss tragic or scary events with our children isn’t new. Generations of parents have had to address various topics from volcano eruptions that wiped out an entire city to the Holocaust to the cold war. But how we get our information has changed dramatically. Media in one form or another is prolific with gory images and misinformation available at the touch of finger. So parents have to react quicker and with more assurance and details than they would probably like. But that’s what we do. We protect our children in all ways, as best we can, with loving and clear information.

Sources:  http://pbskids.org/rogers//parentsteachers/special/scarynews-thoughts.html

Carolyn Knorr, https://www.commonsensemedia.org/blog/explaining-the-news-to-our-kids

 

Daily Dose

Codeine & Children

1:30 to read

I order to keep us all safe, the FDA is constantly monitoring drugs and their side effects.  For many years codeine was prescribed for children for pain relief as well as to suppress coughs.  Over the last few years there has been more and more discussion about limiting the use of narcotics in children, but I continue to see some children who come from seeing other physicians and have received a prescription that contains codeine.

 

The FDA just issued new warnings against using prescription codeine in children and adolescents. The FDA reviewed adverse event reports from the past 50 years and found reports of severe breathing problems and 24 deaths linked to codeine in children and adolescents. Genetic variation in codeine metabolism may lead to excessive morphine levels in some children.

 

The FDA also performed a literature review which noted excessive sleepiness and breathing problems, including one death, in breast-fed infants whose mothers used codeine.

 

Due to these findings the FDA is now recommending that “codeine should not be used for pain or cough in children under 12 years of age”. They have also issued a warning that codeine should not be used in adolescents aged 12-18 “who are obese or have conditions associated with breathing problems, such as obstructive sleep apnea or severe lung disease”. In retrospect, codeine was prescribed to more than 800,000 children younger than11 years in 2011. Amazingly, codeine is currently available in over-the-counter cough medicines in 28 states.  

 

Lastly, the FDA “strengthened the warning” regarding codeine and breast feeding. They now recommend that breast- feeding women do not use codeine…which may change the post delivery pain protocol. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (Ibuprofen) and acetaminophen (Tylenol) are preferred and are effective for mild to moderate postpartum pain. As a pediatrician it is important that I discuss this with new breast-feeding mothers as well. 

Daily Dose

Life Lessons

1.30 to read

I recently spoke to a group of mothers with sons who were in high school. I was discussing “boys to men....the high school years”.   As I was writing my remarks I was thinking about the many lessons I learned while parenting my sons through their high school years.  Funny how it sometimes seems like long ago, and at other times it seems as if it was just yesterday. 

I think one of the biggest lessons I learned while raising teens is something that my mother and father both told me.  There were so many occasions when I begged my parents for “something”. I can remember telling them, “it’s not fair, eryone else has a phone in their room!”  But, being the good parents that they were, they explained all of the reasons that I didn’t need to have my own phone.  I thought that my parents could afford to put a phone in my room, but they said that wasn’t the point.  Their reply was often “just because we can doesn’t mean we should”. 

That statement has probably been made by parents for hundreds of years. But I must say, it is often hard for some parents to follow this adage. We all want to give our children as much as we can, but sometimes by not giving, we are all being better parents. 

Just because you can give your toddler an iPad doesn’t mean that you should. Just because you can give your elementary school child and I-phone doesn’t mean you should.  The same for giving your child a TV in their room, or a car for turning 16.  I really admire the parents who can truly give their child “most anything”, but know that their children need to learn to wait.  

So, I spoke to the parents group about trying to follow my own parents statement when raising my sons. They would probably tell you that we were sometimes “mean and strict” and that they would get upset when we would say “just because we can doesn’t mean we should”.   I think it worked well for our family.....waiting is a hard but necessary lesson. It often makes you more appreciative as well.  

Daily Dose

Social Media & Parenting

1.30 to read

I just finished watching a YouTube video (not a usual past time) that one of our staffers forwarded to me. The subject was “parenting” and my interest was “piqued” as it showed it had received over 13 million hits!  So…I sat down and started to watch.

The 8 minute video is of a father (unfortunately talking while smoking a cigarette) who opens the discussion with the admission that he had been on his daughter’s Facebook and found a lengthy letter written by her to her friends . He is shocked and appalled not only with the content of the letter but with her language. The letter is essentially “parent bashing” as his daughter complains about her “hard life” and all of the things that her parents make her do, which she describes as “slave labor”.

The letter is rather lengthy and itemizes her every complaint peppered with expletives as well.   As the father reads the letter directly into the camera he occasionally ads his own editorialization, but you can tell from his body language that he is about at the end of his rope. He also comments that this is not the first time his daughter has gotten into trouble over her Facebook postings.

After finishing her letter he responds to her comments, again point by point, addressing how “easy” her life really is. He makes the argument that her daily chores take about 5 - 10 minutes to complete, sans complaining. He states that her most important daily task is getting to school each day. 

He also points out all of the trouble and expense that he had recently gone to to get her computer up and working again after she had recently been grounded (which included banning Facebook for some time). 

He sounds like so many frustrated parents who are concerned that their own children have a sense of entitlement and do not have any perspective as to how hard their parents work to provide them with not only food and shelter, but with the computer that allows them to have a Facebook page.

I think many parents would like to write a rebuttal letter to their own children’s complaints and many probably have, but those are not typically shared on U-tube or posted on Facebook. These discussions are usually family matters within each teen’s own home.  His disappointment in her behavior is real and raw. While it may be riveting, is this really an appropriate means of addressing his daughter’s behavior?  His own comments are also peppered with expletives. What about a parent’s need to model behavior they expect in their children?

But just when you think he is finished venting, he takes out a gun and shoots her computer, not once or twice, but numerous times. It is almost as if he cannot stop himself. Really, a gun?  How about taking away the computer again rather than destroying it?

There are many moments in the video where I share his frustration and anger, as I have had those moments with my own teens (more than once.)

But, his posting on her Facebook page seemed both immature and bullying rather than a conversation that should have occurred in the privacy of their home.

A parent cannot discipline with “an eye for an eye”.  His point would have been better taken had he showed more self-control, which at times is difficult but necessary for a parent. Remember, when you are the parent it is not about you, rather it is about your child.

What do you think? I would love your feedback.

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Your Child

Pre-teen Football Linked to Brain Changes in NFL Players

2:00

The start of a new school year also brings after-school sports programs. Late summer and fall is prime football season for many middle and high schools. In some states, it’s a hallowed tradition that boys and girls look forward to participating in whether it’s running down the field or cheering on the team.

While school football doesn’t typically offer the same ferocious body beating and brain –rattling that are seen in the National Football League (NFL), a new study shows that brain development can still be affected by playing football at a young age.

The study looked at the possible connection between a greater risk of altered brain development in NFL players who started playing football before the age of twelve as opposed to those players who began playing later in life.  The study is the first to show a link between early repetitive head trauma and future structural brain variations.

The study was small but interesting. It included a review of 40 former NFL players between the ages of 40 and 65 who played over 12 years of structured football with a minimum of 2 years at the NFL level.

One half of the players took up football prior to the age of 12 and half started at age 12 or later. The number of concussions suffered was very similar between the two groups. All of these players had a minimum of six months of memory and cognitive issues.

"To examine brain development in these players, we used an advanced technique called diffusor tensor imaging (DTI), a type of magnetic resonance imaging that specifically looks at the movement of water molecules along white matter tracts, which are the super-highways within the brain for relaying commands and information," study author Dr. Inga Koerte, professor of neurobiological research at the University of Munich and visiting professor at Harvard University, said in a press release.

The researches believe their findings add to the growing amount of scientific evidence that shows the brain may be especially vulnerable to injury between the ages of 10 and 12.

"Therefore, this development process may be disrupted by repeated head impacts in childhood possibly leading to lasting changes in brain structure," said study author Julie Stamm, currently a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.

Despite finding a link to the brain development window where kids are more likely to suffer brain injury by repeated head impacts, the small size of the study means the results may not necessarily apply to non-professionals.

"The results of this study do not confirm a cause and effect relationship, only that there is an association between younger age of first exposure to tackle football and abnormal brain imaging patterns later in life," said study author Martha Shenton, a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Because of the intense publicity about and the findings of many studies on the short and long-term dangers of concussions, many school sports programs are looking at changing how they allow students to play in games associated with head injuries.  Where it was once common for coaches to let players continue playing after a particularly rough tackle or head butting, they are more likely now to insist that a field medical professional examine the child. Some schools are also implementing no tackle policies to protect very young players.

While traditional football isn’t likely to become extinct, parents and coaches can educate themselves about brain injuries and learn how to best protect young players from the chances of long and short-term disabilities.

Source: Brett Smith,  http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/1113407634/pre-teen-football-linked-to-more-severe-brain-changes-in-nfl-players-081115/

 

 

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