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Daily Dose

Talk To Your Child At Every Opportunity

1.30 to read

A frequent subject among us “older moms “ is the observation that parents with young children are not talking to their children.  Now, what do I mean by that?

It seems that the parents are busy talking on their cell phones, or texting or replying to e-mails on their iPhones or Blackberry’s. I often see young mothers strolling their children around the neighborhood, but the child is in their stroller and the mother is talking away on her cell phone, or listening to her iPod oblivious that this is a perfect opportunity to be talking with her child. There are so many subjects to talk about while strolling an infant or young child. The sun, wind, flowers, trees, squirrels, lawnmower noises, different colors of flowers, the list is endless. All of these conversations are important to developing language for infants and toddlers. As you probably know, it is not as important what you are talking about with an infant, but that you are talking, all of the time. As your child is a little older it is important to talk to children about things around them, describing objects and events, and telling them stories. What better place to discuss how squirrels find acorns that might one day become a tall oak tree. Now that we are the “wired” generation the opportunities to just have idle chatter and conversation with your child seem to be limited. I have even noticed this in my office as parents and their children are waiting for the doctor (I apologize for running late!). In years gone by (now I really sound old) I would walk into an examining room and the mother or father and their child would be playing hangman on the exam table paper, or they might be playing “I spy” in the room, or even playing patty cake or “where’s your eyes, where’s your nose” with a one-year-old. There was interaction and conversation. Now it is not uncommon for the parent to be answering the phone and texting while the child is “hooked up” to a DVD player watching anything from Baby Einstein, to a Disney movie. I understand that waiting for the doctor is boring and nerve wracking, so that may not be the best example, but the point is the same, interact with your child at every opportunity. The importance of talking to your children to encourage language acquisition was supported by a recent study in Pediatrics. Dr. Zimmerman, the lead author, looked at not only the importance of reading, and talking to your child to promote language skills, but actually showed that conversing with children is important in acquisition of language. Not surprisingly, they found that children who had increased exposure to adult speech had higher preschool language scores than children who had greater amounts of television viewing. Interestingly, they also found that preschool language scores significantly improved the more an adult and child conversed back and forth. By using dialogue rather than just talking to children, parents could better foster their children’s developing language skills. Zimmerman showed the importance of getting back to the basics. Not only is it important for parents to read to their children, or to tell stories and limit television viewing, it is also important to engage their children in discussions, on just about subject. It doesn’t have to be rocket science. So, the next time you have the opportunity to talk with your child , turn off the hardware and have a conversation, whether it is through babble or a lengthy discussion. We don’t want the next generation to forget that language is an inherent tool for engagement with others. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

Mom Judging

1:30 to read

This whole “mommy judging” is really becoming too much!  The latest involves Christy Teigen and her decision to go out to dinner 2 weeks after the birth of her daughter.  Why is she being judged about going out with her husband?  Even a new mother needs to eat!

When I am seeing a newborn for their first visit to the pediatrician I spend a great deal of time talking with the baby’s parents about the stress of having a newborn. While there are so many “highs” after bringing a new baby home, there are also the “lows” of feeling overwhelmed, sleep deprived, and feeling as if you aren’t prepared to be a parent (even after taking every class and reading every book).  For many parents just hearing that they are experiencing “normal” emotions is reassuring.  

During these discussions (while I am usually rocking that sweet newborn) I also inquire as to whether there are family or friends nearby,  or any other help in the home…knowing that “all hands on deck” can be a wonderful feeling when you just need a break, and yes, every parent, especially new parents need to have “a break”.  Whether that is a nap, or a long shower, or a quick trip to the store to pick up that special “sleep sack” you know will help your baby sleep…a break is healthy.  

A new mother also needs to eat and sleep to ensure that she is making milk in order to successfully breastfeed her newborn.  I remember being a new mother, even 30 years ago, and skipping meals because I was either “too tired”  to eat or “too busy” and my husband being wonderful and saying, “your Mom is going to keep the baby for an hour or two while we go out for a quick dinner!”.  While I am sure that I had a bit of trepidation about leaving our son,  and also figuring out how to nurse him just before we darted out the door,  I went!  The good news was that there were no cell phones or social media to interfere with our “new parent” quiet dinner out. i did not have to call home or text every 30 seconds to check on the baby, and my mother was quite capable of babysitting for an hour or two. No one was posting a picture of us leaving our baby, or commenting that I was “ a bad mother” for leaving my home….in fact, the whole event went unnoticed.  What I also remember is the feeling of re-connecting with my husband (who was also a new father), and having a quiet, nutritious dinner which re-energized us for another long day or night….

But now fast forward to 2016 and the CONSTANT connection with the world!!  Add in a celebrity who is being photographed day and night and whose every move is discussed and dissected. In this case being judged as a new mother for going out to dinner.  Christy did not take her new baby out to a crowded restaurant (you know how I feel about that), nor did she leave her baby home unattended.  She did not put her baby at risk at all. What she did do, was go out for dinner with her husband, albeit with lots of paparazzi following her. Going to dinner does not mean she “is an unfit mother”, it has nothing to do “with bonding with her baby” or “neglecting a newborn”.  So, she didn’t get to make a choice on her own, she didn’t put the issue out there for public comment either….she simply went out to dinner. Enough…leave her and other new mothers alone.

 

 

Daily Dose

Your Child's Sitter

1:30 to read

Do you ever leave your child with a babysitter or caregiver? Weird question right? But some parents never want to leave their child with someone else....and I am not sure that is healthy for either parent or child.   

I recently had this discussion with parents of a 3 year old child who was having a terrible time with separation anxiety. While many children go through stages of separation anxiety, by the time a child is 3-4 years they are typically past this stage. When I was talking with this family they told me their child had never been left with anyone.  

I guess as a working mother I was incredulous. What? Had the parents never gone out to dinner or to a party, a concert, lecture  or even on a night away for some much needed “couple” time?  They told me that they would occasionally call in grandparents but typically took their child everywhere with them.  (I think there are many places such as movies, adult restaurants, and other venues that might not want the 2 year old in tow).   I suppose some would say the child was fortunate, but I really believe that as a child reaches age 2ish they need to begin learning to separate from their parent. Not for days or weeks, but for either a play group, a pre school program, the gym nursery or something where the child is learning a bit of independence.   

While some parents are quite fortunate that they don’t have to leave their child to go to work every day, the concept of leaving your child for any hour or two with a trusted babysitter should not cause anxiety for the parent and ultimately not the child. Separation is an important milestone, as your child learns that while you may leave for an hour or two, you always return. There is security in that knowledge. They will also learn how to interact with  other adults and children, which is often different than they do with their own parents.  (Ask any teacher about that phenomena). 

Autonomy and independence are typically traits that parents desire for their children.  Parents also need to have some autonomy as well.....I think this makes for a better parent child relationship in the long run.  Little steps in separating become bigger steps as a child grows older....starting with a babysitter or nursery for an hour or two on occasion is often the beginning. 

Parenting

Bedwetting Accidents

1:45

I’ll admit it; I was a bed-wetter on and off until I was about 6 years of age. The biggest hurdle I faced in getting past leaving a little puddle of urine in the bed during the night, was visually realistic dreams. I would actually see myself get out of bed, walk to the bathroom and sit on the toilet. Unfortunately, I was only dreaming and would awaken after feeling a wet spot in the bed. It was quite embarrassing.

An accident in a friend’s bed during a sleepover was the last straw.

It took several pre-bedtime experiments to finally help me make it through the night dry; but eventually I was able to tell reality from dreams.

How common is bedwetting? Nocturnal enuresis (the medical name for bedwetting) is involuntary urination that happens at night during sleep after the age when a child should be able to control his or her bladder.

About 13 percent of 6 year olds wet the bed, while about 5 percent of 10 year olds.

Bedwetting sometimes runs in families – if one or both parents wet the bed when they were children, odds are that their children will too.

Most of the time, bedwetting goes away on its’ own. Until that time, it can test a parent’s patience and cause a child plenty of anxiety.

To help a child cope with this uncomfortable time, reassure your child that bedwetting is a normal part of growing up for many kids, and that it will not last forever. If you have stories of your own experiences, this would be the time to share them with your little one.

My child also wet the bed and one sure way to stop her tears of embarrassment was to tell her one of my own personal experiences.  It didn’t take long to switch from sobbing to laughing over our shared nighttime horror.

Kidhealth.org offers these tips for breaking the bedwetting spell:

- Try to have your child drink more fluids during the daytime hours and less at night (and avoid caffeine-containing drinks). Then remind your child to go to the bathroom one final time before bedtime. Many parents find that using a motivational system, such as stickers for dry nights with a small reward (such as a book) after a certain number of stickers, can work well. Bedwetting alarms also can be helpful.

- When your child wakes with wet sheets, don't yell or punish. Have your child help you change the sheets. Explain that this isn't punishment, but it is part of the process. It may even help your child feel better knowing that he or she helped out. Offer praise when your child has a dry night.

Sometimes, bedwetting can be a signal that there is a medical condition that should be checked out. If it begins suddenly or is accompanied by other symptoms, talk to your pediatrician.

The doctor may check for signs of a urinary tract infection (UTI), constipation, bladder problems, diabetes, or severe stress.

Call the doctor if your child:

•       Suddenly starts wetting the bed after being consistently dry for at least 6 months

•       Begins to wet his or her pants during the day

•       Snores at night

•       Complains of a burning sensation or pain when urinating

•       Has to pee frequently

•       Is drinking or eating much more than usual

•       Has swelling of the feet or ankles

•       Is 7 years of age or older and still wetting the bed

Bedwetting can be a sign that a child is under a lot of stress. Often, when a child loses a family member or pet, is doing poorly in school or is frightened about something, they will suddenly start wetting the bed – even if they’ve never done it before or have mastered the art of getting through the night dry.

Your support and patience can go a long way in helping your child feel better about and overcome the bedwetting.

Remember, the long-term outlook is excellent and in almost all cases, dry days are just ahead.

As for me, I had to find a touchstone to let me know the difference between dreaming and actually getting up to go the bathroom. It was the bathroom light switch. If I actually touched the light switch and turned it on, then counted to five before moving, I was really awake. If the light was already on and I walked to the toilet and sat down- I was dreaming.

Story source: http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/enuresis.html#

 

 

Your Baby

Baby's Healthy Dental Habits Begin at Birth!

1:45

Did you know that your baby’s teeth are at risk for decay as soon as they first appear?  Typically, a baby’s first tooth starts pushing up through the gums around 6 months of age. You can actually help prevent tooth decay by beginning an oral hygiene routine as early as the first few days after birth. Start by cleaning your baby’s mouth by wiping the gums with a clean gauze pad. This helps removes plaque that can harm erupting teeth. When your child's teeth begin to come in, brush them gently with a child's size toothbrush and a small amount of fluoride toothpaste, about the size of a grain of rice.

Tooth decay in infants and toddlers is often referred to as Baby Bottle Tooth Decay. It most often occurs in the upper front teeth, but other teeth may also be affected. In some cases, infants and toddlers experience decay so severe that their teeth cannot be saved and need to be removed.

Use only formula or breast-milk if bottle-feeding. An infant should finish their bottle before naptime or bedtime.

Most children will have a full set of 20 baby teeth by the time they are 3-years-old. As your child grows, their jaws also grow, making room for their permanent teeth.

Here are some cleaning tips to help prevent cavity formation and to help develop good oral hygiene at an early age.

·      Begin cleaning your baby’s mouth during the first few days after birth by wiping the gums with a clean, moist gauze pad or washcloth. As soon as teeth appear, decay can occur.

·      For children younger than 3 years, caregivers should begin brushing children’s teeth as soon as they begin to come into the mouth. Brush teeth thoroughly twice per day (morning and night) or as directed by a dentist or physician. Supervise children’s brushing to ensure that they use of the appropriate amount of toothpaste.

·      As children get a little older, increase the amount of toothpaste. For children 3 to 6 years of age, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Continue to make sure your child’s teeth are brushed twice a day and remind them not to swallow the toothpaste.

·      Once your child has two teeth that touch – you can teach them how to gently floss to remove any food that might get stuck between the teeth.

Teething is one of the first rituals of life. As your little one’s teeth begin to appear he or she may become fussy, have trouble sleeping and is irritable. Infants sometimes lose their appetite or drool more than usual. Diarrhea, rashes and a fever are not normal symptoms for a teething baby. If your infant has a fever or diarrhea while teething or continues to be cranky and uncomfortable, call your physician.

When should you plan on your baby’s first dental appointment? As soon as the first tooth appears! The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends that the first dental visit take place within six months after the first tooth appears, but no later than a child’s first birthday. Don’t wait for them to start school or until there's an emergency. Get your child comfortable today with good mouth healthy habits.

During the dental visit you can expect the dentist to:

•       Inspect for oral injuries, cavities or other problems.

•       Let you know if your child is at risk of developing tooth decay.

•       Clean your child’s teeth and provide tips for daily care.

•       Discuss teething, pacifier use, or finger/thumb-sucking habits.

•       Discuss treatment, if needed, and schedule the next check-up.

As you can see, the road to healthy teeth starts early! Starting good oral hygiene habits as soon as your baby’s first tooth comes in can help prevent tooth decay later and spot any jaw or alignment issues before they become a problem.

Story source: http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/babies-and-kids/healthy-habits/

Your Teen

Parenting Tweens & Teens

2.15 to read

As a mother or father, who hasn’t wished that their child came with a “How To Be The Perfect Parent” handbook? It would be nice if for every stage of emotional and physical growth there was a clear –one size fits all- plan that would take the stress and confusion out of developing good parenting skills. Alas though, there’s no such thing, but there are experts who can help guide you. 

With children come different personalities that respond uniquely to his or her situations. It’s part of the challenge of raising a mature, thoughtful and self-sufficient adult.

The tween and teen years can be some of the most challenging times for child and parent relationships.

What is a “tween?” The tween years are approximately 9-14. It is less an age category than a developmental stage when your son or daughter is no longer a child and not yet a teen. Today puberty is statistically happening at younger ages on the average and that could be confusing to parents who think that their kids will be childlike until they’re 12.

More focus is placed on tween behaviors now than just 2 or 3 generations ago. Society has changed dramatically during the last decade.  Media images that encourage “grown-up” looks and behaviors as well exposure to sexualized fashion, music, and even dolls has had an enormous impact on this generation of youngsters.  The tween years aren’t what they used to be.

Everything is in flux as your little one strives for more independence, and you try your best to help them avoid making mistakes that can last a lifetime. And then there is the “generational gap” that puts a strain on being able to even have a civil conversation. Fashion, music, drugs, alcohol, sex, movies, cars, celebrities, school and peers begin to play a larger role in their life than you can possibly imagine.

And then there are teenagers, the adolescent years between 13 and 19. 

There may not be a one size fits all easy-peasy guide to parenting available, but there are tips from experts that can help parents navigate the rough waters of the tween and teen years.

WebMD.com delves into 5 common mistakes parents make as their children hit the unpredictable tween and teen years. Let’s take a look at some recommendations.

Parenting Mistake # 1- Expecting the worse from your child.

Although the tween and teen years can be difficult, expecting the worse from your child can lead to self-fulfilling behaviors. 

Teenagers get a bad rap, says Richard Lerner, PhD, director of the Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development at Tufts University. Many parents approach raising teenagers as an ordeal, believing they can only watch helplessly as their lovable children transform into unpredictable monsters. Expecting the worst sets parents and teens up for several unhappy, unsatisfying years together.

“The message we give teenagers is that they’re only ‘good’ if they’re not doing ‘bad’ things, such as doing drugs, hanging around with the wrong crowd, or having sex,” Lerner tells WebMD. Raising teenagers with negative expectations can actually promote the behavior you fear most. According to a recent study conducted at Wake Forest University, teens whose parents expected them to get involved in risky behaviors reported higher levels of these behaviors one year later.

Lerner urges parents to focus on their teenagers’ interests and hobbies, even if you don’t understand them. You could open a new path of communication, reconnect with the child you love, and learn something new.

Parenting Mistake # 2 – Reading too many parenting books.

What was I just saying about wanting a book to provide all the parenting answers? It appears that is not only impossible, but it’s not even a good idea.

Rather than trusting their instincts, many parents turn to outside experts for advice on how to raise teens. “Parents can tie themselves into knots trying to follow the advice they read in books,” says Robert Evans, EdD, executive director of the Human Relations Service, Wellesley, Mass., and author of Family Matters: How Schools Can Cope with the Crisis in Child Rearing.

“Books become a problem when parents use them to replace their own innate skills,” Evans tells WebMD. “If the recommendations and their personal style don’t fit, parents wind up more anxious and less confident with their own children.”

Use books (and articles like this) to get perspective on confusing behavior and then put them down. Spend the extra time talking with your spouse and children, getting clear about what matters most to you and your family.

Parenting Mistake #3 - Sweat the Small Stuff 

Too often, we all sweat the small stuff, and sometimes ignore the big stuff. It’s certainly much easier to focus in on a behavior that we don’t like instead of trying to deal with a behavior that is frightening or dangerous.

Maybe you don’t like your daughter’s haircut or choice of clothes. Or perhaps she didn’t get the part in the play you know she deserves. Before you intervene, look at the big picture. If a certain mode of self-expression or set of events does not put your child at risk, give her the leeway to make age-appropriate decisions and live with the results.

“A lot of parents don’t want growing up to involve any pain, disappointment, or failure,” Evans says. But protecting your child from the realities of life robs her of the opportunity to take chances and learn from her mistakes while she’s still under your roof. Step back and let your child know you’re there when she needs you.

Parenting Mistake # 4 - Ignore the Big Stuff 

The big stuff is where things get dicey.

If you suspect your child is using alcohol or drugs, do not look the other way. Parents should address suspected drug or alcohol use right away, before it escalates into a bigger problem, says Amelia M. Arria, PhD, director of the Center on Young Adult Health and Development at the University of Maryland School of Public Health.

“The years when kids are between 13 and 18 years old are an essential time for parents to stay involved,” Arria tells WebMD. Parents might consider teen drinking a rite of passage because they drank when they were that age. “But the stakes are higher now,” she says.

More drugs are available today, illegal drugs and legal medications. For example, cough remedies with DXM (dextromethorphan) have become a new drug of choice for some teens. DXM is easy to get and teens and parents alike underrate its potential dangers. Studies show that between 7% and 10% of U.S. teens have reported abusing cough medicine to get high. Although safe when used as directed, DXM can cause hallucinations and disassociations similar to PCP or ketamine (Special K) when used in excessive amounts, as well as rapid heartbeat, unconsciousness, stomach pain, and vomiting.

Watch for unexplained changes in your teen’s behavior, appearance, academic performance, and friends. If you find empty cough medicine packaging in your child’s trash or backpack, if bottles of medicine go missing from your cabinet, or if you find unfamiliar pills, pipes, rolling papers, or matches, your child could be abusing drugs. Take these signs seriously and get involved. Safeguard all the medicines you have: Know which products are in your home and how much medication is in each package or bottle.

Drugs are not the only “Big stuff” to keep an eye on; too much time on the computer or texting, sexual activities and interests, distracted driving habits are just a few other categories that require more attention from parents.

Tweens and teens make mistakes and get themselves in over their head with drugs and alcohol, sexual behaviors, poor school grades and more. These risk behaviors can become real problems in your teen's life and be hurdles in the way of their success. While it's important for a parent of a teenager to allow privacy, we also have to be monitoring what our teens are into so we can help guide them away from risk taking behaviors. Your teen needs to have limits in your home. When you allow your teen to do anything they want, they will begin to take control and you are no longer the parent.

Parenting Mistake #5 - Rule With an Iron Fist, or Kid Gloves

Some parents, sensing a loss of control over their teens’ behavior, crack down every time their child steps out of line. Every day brings a new punishment. The home becomes a war zone. By contrast, other parents avoid all conflict for fear their teens will push them away. They put being a cool parent ahead of setting limits and enforcing rules. For these parents, discipline is a dirty word.

This style of parenting focuses on obedience above all else. Although the house may run like a tight ship, teens raised in rigid environments don’t have the opportunity to develop problem-solving or leadership skills.

Yet too little discipline does a disservice to teens as well. Teenagers need clear structure and rules to live by as they start to explore the world outside. It is up to parents to establish their household’s core values and communicate these to their children through words and consistent actions. Lerner calls this being an authoritative parent, an approach that “helps children develop the skills they need to govern themselves in appropriate ways.”

 

One key thing to remember about the tween and teen years is .. it’s not personal. It may feel very personal when your child yells that they hate you, can’t stand you, or never wants to see you again, but in most cases, it’s an angry outburst driven by not getting their way.  Remember your teen years?  We’ve all said things we regret later, learning to communicate effectively with your teen or tween smoothes a lot of bumpy roads.

Keep in mind that your influence runs deeper than you think. Most teens say they want to spend more time with their parents. And teens choose friends that have their parents’ core values. Keep making time for your child throughout the tween and teen years. Even when it doesn’t show, you provide the solid ground they know they can always come home to.

 

Daily Dose

Parenting is Hard Work!

1:30 to read

Being a mom (as well as a dad) is one of the hardest jobs in the world....and as many a person has pointed out, it pays a lot less than minimum wage.  But, it is also the best job in the world.

I have the privilege of seeing a lot of mothers everyday. From the time they come in with their brand new infant until their children have graduated from college....mothers worry about the “job” they are doing.  For a new mother who is already hearing that voice in her head...”am I doing this right?”, 

it is very reassuring for her to hear me say, “you can’t mess this up yet!” Your baby loves you unconditionally, just like you do them.

But as your child gets older it takes a great deal of self-esteem to sometimes feel as if you are “doing it right”.  Children of all ages can sometimes bring us to our knees...how can a small child know just the right thing to say, and that teenager...well, enough said.So, I like to tell them my own stories about raising children and my days of feeling like a failure, or at the least an inadequate mother....especially as your children point this out to you.

When my oldest and very verbal son was about 6, he was riding in the front seat with me (crazy huh) and I stopped the car in front of our neighbor’s house where our 4 year old son was heading to play. I rolled down the window to give the 4 year old some instructions when the eldest son leaned over and started telling his younger brother what to do. So. in my best “mommy voice” I tell the 6 year old that I am the mother and will handle this, to which he doesn’t miss a beat and responds ”if you were doing a better job of being a mommy I wouldn’t have to help you!”  Enough said.

It takes a lot of self esteem and true grit to be a mom. Hang in there.  We all have those days when we know we are doing our best and our kids disagree. 

Your Baby

Formula-Fed Babies: How Much and How Often?

2:00

There are many reasons a mother may choose to use formula instead of breast milk when feeding her newborn. There are also times when mothers decide to switch from nursing to formula, as their baby gets a little older.  Whether you’re breastfeeding or giving formula, it’s generally recommended that babies be fed when they seem hungry.

What kind of schedule and how much formula do formula-fed babies need? It all depends on the baby. While each infant’s appetite and needs may be a little different – there are general rules of thumb that can be helpful for moms to know.

According to Healthychildren.org, after the first few days, your formula-fed newborn will take from 2 to 3 ounces (60–90 ml) of formula per feeding and will eat every three to four hours on average during his or her first few weeks.

Occasionally, you may have a sleeper who seems to like visiting dreamland longer than most babies. If during the first month your baby sleeps longer than four or five hours, wake him or her up and offer a bottle.

By the end of his or her first month, they’ll usually be up to at least 4 ounces (120 ml) per feeding, with a fairly predictable schedule of feedings about every four hours.

By six months, your baby will typically consume 6 to 8 ounces (180–240 ml) at each of four or five feedings in twenty-four hours.

Since babies can’t communicate with words, parents have to learn how to read the signs and signals baby uses to express wants.

How do you know your baby is hungry? Here are signs baby may be ready to eat:

•       Moving their heads from side to side

•       Opening their mouths

•       Sticking out their tongues

•       Placing their hands, fingers, and fists to their mouths

•       Puckering their lips as if to suck

•       Nuzzling against their mothers' breasts

•       Showing the rooting reflex (when a baby moves its mouth in the direction of something that's stroking or touching its cheek)

•       Crying

The crying signal can be confusing for parents. It doesn’t always mean the same thing. Crying is also a last resort when baby is hungry. Your baby should be fed before he or she gets so hungry that they get upset and cry. That’s why guidelines are helpful when starting out.

Most babies are satisfied with 3 to 4 ounces (90–120 ml) per feeding during the first month and increase that amount by 1 ounce (30 ml) per month until they reach a maximum of about 7 to 8 ounces (210–240 ml). If your baby consistently seems to want more or less than this, discuss it with your pediatrician. Your baby should drink no more than 32 ounces (960 ml) of formula in 24 hours. Some babies have higher needs for sucking and may just want to suck on a pacifier after feeding.

Eventually, baby will develop a time schedule of his or her own. As you become more familiar with your baby’s signals and sleep patterns, you’ll be able to design a feeding schedule tailored to your infant’s needs.

Between two and four months of age (or when the baby weighs more than 12 pounds [5.4 kg]), most formula-fed babies no longer need a middle-of-the night feeding, because they’re consuming more during the day and their sleeping patterns have become more regular (although this varies considerably from baby to baby). Their stomach capacity has increased, too, which means they may go longer between daytime feedings—occasionally up to four or five hours at a time. If your baby still seems to feed very frequently or consume larger amounts, try distracting him with play or with a pacifier. Sometimes patterns of obesity begin during infancy, so it is important not to overfeed your baby.

The most important thing to remember is that there is no “one schedule and formula amount fits all” when it comes to babies and their needs.

No one can tell you exactly how often or how much your baby boy or girl needs to be fed, but good communication with your pediatrician and learning how to read your baby’s body language will go a long way in keeping baby’s feedings on track.

Story sources: https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/feeding-nutrition/Pages/Amount-and-Schedule-of-Formula-Feedings.aspx

http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/formulafeed-often.html

 

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DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

Can you use homeopathic products to relieve your child's illness?

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Can you use homeopathic products to relieve your child's illness?

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