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Daily Dose

Read To Your Kids

1:30 to read

I know that there seems to be a “national” day for almost everything these days…we just celebrated National Dog Day! (who doesn’t love a dog…but not all families want, have space or  extra income to care for a dog). But there is one thing all parents can do and celebrate very day regardless of socioeconomic background, ethnicity, or geographic location…they can read to their child in the first 5 years of life (and maybe even longer!) 

Try reading to your child 15 minutes a day. The benefits are endless!  Seems like an easy enough “to do” and something that all parents can start from the time their baby is an infant. Newborns need to hear their parents voices and  language early on as a baby’s brain grows exponentially and will actually double in size in the first year of life alone.

A recent study conducted by You.Gov for the Read Aloud Campaign found that only about 46% of parents read aloud with their child every day and only 34% do so for the recommended 15 minutes.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has also recommended that all children, beginning at birth, are read to every day. In another survey while six in 10 ( 62%) of parents admit to receiving advice to read aloud to their child only 8% actually followed through.  When asked why they have not read to their child parents site “I can’t find the time in the day”, while over half of the parents surveyed say “their child watches TV or uses a tablet at home rather than being read to”. Some parents say, “their child won’t sit still” to be read aloud to.  But if you realized the head start you are giving your child….could you find the time?

Scientists know that a baby’s and toddler’s brain is making huge connections among the 100 billion neurons they are born with.  By the age 3 there will be about 1,000 trillion connections between those neurons.  These are also the critical years in the development of a child’s language skills.   A child will quadruple the number of words they know between the ages of 1 and 2 years.  Yes, they will mimic everything….even words you wished they had not heard so be careful.

Reading aloud is one of the single most important things a parent or caregiver can do to help a child prepare for learning.  Children who have been exposed to books while listening and reading daily with a parent get a head start in language and literacy skills.  Unfortunately,  more than one in three children begin kindergarten without the necessary skills of listening and learning.  Some are at such a disadvantage that they may not be able to “catch up”.

So, I find myself giving books as baby gifts more and more these days - as who doesn’t have a favorite book or two that make timeless gifts (that may even be passed on to the next generation).  Nursery rhymes, Good Night Moon, Pat the Bunny are a few of my favorites as well as all books by Dr. Seuss and Eric Carle. 

So make it a new habit whether your child is 1 day, 1 month, 1 year or older….read aloud 15 minutes a day and before you know it your child will be reading to you!!!

Daily Dose

Flying With A Baby

1:15 to read

Overheard on the plane this week:  I am in row 15 and there is the cutest most precious 4-5 month old baby girl behind me in row 16.  Key point….she is sleeping as we are making our approach!

 

The mother of the baby is traveling with her mother so there are is a grandmother along to dote on this darling baby. The mother of the baby says to her mother…”we need to wake her up now!!!”  “Mom, please wake her up as we need to feed her NOW!”  At this point the mother takes out a whisk of some sort to put into the breast milk…do you have to mix with a whisk now?

 

So…of course they wake up the baby who starts to cry, but just a bit…and then the grandmother starts to feed the baby the bottle.  The mother is saying, “Mom, just make her eat”.  Now it is really bumpy as we are getting ready to land and I was wishing I had a bottle to calm me too!

 

The baby seems to be quietly eating, but then must have stopped eating as now the mother of the baby takes the baby from the grandmother and starts to try to give her daughter the bottle.  She starts talking to the baby saying, “ please keep eating so your ears will stay clear” followed by “Mommy is going to drink the bottle, so you can see me keeping my ears clear too”.  “If you keep sucking your ears will be pain free”. 

 

Everything seems to be going well…although we still have not landed, when the mother says “I am going to force feed you to keep your ears clear!”  Uh…oh I am thinking, I know where this may be going.  But it seems so far, so good. 

 

Just as we are about to touch down I hear this gurgling noise from behind me and then the mother saying, “Oh dear she is spitting up!!”   Really, are you shocked??

 

But…I must say, the baby was quiet and content…who knows, I would have never awakened that sweet baby girl, but then again, I still believe, “never wake a sleeping baby”, even on an airplane.

 

 

 

Your Teen

Young Male Athletes, Parental Pressure and Doping

1:45

When 129 young male athletes, whose average age was 17, were asked what would make them consider “doping” as a way to boost their athletic ability – the majority said parental pressure.

A new study from the University of Kent in England asked the young male athletes about their attitudes on "doping" -- the use of prohibited drugs, such as steroids, hormones or stimulants, to increase athletic competence.

These substances, sometimes called performance-enhancing drugs, can potentially alter the human body and biological functions. However, they can be extremely harmful to a person's health, experts warn.

The study group was also asked about four different aspects of perfectionism. The areas were: parental pressure; self-striving for perfection; concerns about making mistakes; and pressure from coaches.

Only parental pressure was linked to positive feelings about doping among the athletes, the study authors found. Although the study was small, it did point out how important demanding expectations from parents can be to kids. 

Lead author of the study, Daniel Madigan, a Ph.D. student in the university's School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, said the findings suggest that parents need to recognize the consequences of putting too much pressure on young athletes in the family.

"The problem of pressure from parents watching their children play sports is widely known, with referees and sporting bodies highlighting the difficulties and taking steps to prevent it," Madigan said in a university news release.

"With the rise of so-called 'tiger' parenting-- where strict and demanding parents push their children to high levels of achievement -- this study reveals the price young athletes may choose to pay to meet their parents' expectations and dreams," Madigan added.

The researchers only focused on young men for this study but plan to investigate if the same result will occur with young female athletes, and if there are differences between athletes in team versus individual sports.

The study findings are scheduled for publication in the April print issue of the Journal of Sports Sciences.

Story source: Robert Preidt, http://teens.webmd.com/news/20160229/young-athletes-pressured-by-parents-may-resort-to-doping

 

Your Child

Setting Up a Routine for Homework

2:00

If yours is like a lot of families, you’re just not quite ready to face the homework hurdle. But like it or not, after school assignments have arrived and helping your child get into a regular routine can actually make it easier for everyone.

Deborah Linebarger, PhD, associate professor of education at the University of Iowa, has come up with six tips to help families get back in the assignment swing of things.

Be prepared: Even if you’ve already picked up all the supplies your child needs at school, make sure the staples needed to complete assignments are also available at home. Items like pencils, erasers, folders, clips, rulers, computer paper & toner should have their own space and be ready to use if needed. This is also a good time let them set up a special place in the house where they can work undisturbed and with all the supplies they need. You may discover you have a budding interior designer with a knack for organization!

Set A Schedule: You child should do her homework at the same time every day. Many kids need a break after school for a snack and a little running around first. It's best to get homework done as early as possible -- when it drags on past dinner and toward bedtime, the work is likely to take longer and be sloppier.

Bedtime: Don’t leave homework till the last minute, make sure that it’s finished and checked at least a couple of hours before bedtime. Just like adults, children need plenty of good sleep to function well the next day. Preschoolers typically need 11-13 hours each night. Six to thirteen year olds need around 9-11 hours and teens need about 8 -10 hours a night. Make sleep a priority by having a cool, quiet and dark bedroom. Establish an appropriate bedtime for your child and stick to it. Cut off the access to computers, TVS, phones and any electronics at a minimum of an hour before it’s time for sleep. Quieting and slowing down before it’s actually time to nod off can help relax your child.

Break it down. Younger kids might get a week's worth of homework on Monday to turn in by Friday. Older children may have big responsibilities like term papers and science projects. Help them break large projects into smaller steps, and make sure they start early.

Keep up with your child’s assignments so that you’re not surprised by a last minute science project the night before it’s due!

Encourage "peer collaboration" -- to a point. It may be helpful for siblings close in age to do homework together. The older one may be proud and happy to offer help to the younger one. But if they bicker more than they cooperate, it's time for separate spaces.

What if you have a child with ADHD? As you probably already know, children with ADHD are more likely to face extra challenges with completing their homework.

He or she will need even more supervision and guidance, Linebarger says.

"Start by breaking up homework into really bite-sized amounts," she says. "For a younger child, that may be only about 10-minute increments. Expand them slowly as they show they're able to handle it." And expect that your child will need you to watch her homework efforts closely to make sure he or she stays on task.

When they gets distracted -- and they will -- encourage your boy or girl to do something physical to get back on track. "Let her jump up and run around for 5 minutes, or have him do 10 push-ups or 30 jumping jacks," Linebarger says. "Research shows that acute physical activity right before a challenging mental task helps to control behavior."

Children with ADHD often hear a lot of criticism, be sure and compliment them and encourage them when they’ve completed a difficult task.

When they manage to sit still for that 10 minutes of homework, or come home with their homework folder in order, give them lots of praise for making a great choice," Linebarger says.

It won’t be long till summer is a fond memory and the school year is just how things are. You can help your child adjust to this either new or familiar way of getting through Monday through Friday by using the tips above and finding out what adjustments may need to be made to work best for your family.

Source: Gina Shaw, http://www.webmd.com/parenting/features/back-school-homework-routine

 

Daily Dose

Maternity Leave & Breastfeeding

1:15 to read

When Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla, his pediatrician wife, had their baby last year he announced that he would be taking off 2 months to be at home with his wife and baby. For those fortunate enough to work for Facebook or Google or another company with a generous maternity/paternity leave policy they too may get anywhere from 2-6 months of paid leave after the birth of their baby. But for most workers, it is more the “norm” that a mother receives anywhere from 4-6 weeks of maternity leave, and in many cases it is not paid.   The first several months of being a new parent are often overwhelming, but knowing that you have 4-6 months of paid leave which allows you time to “become a family” certainly makes the adjustment to parent hood a bit easier.

Unfortunately, physicians (including pediatricians) are faced with returning to their practice often “as quickly as possible”.  I found that going back to work after 12 weeks (which I had to beg for) and trying to juggle a full load of patients, answering phone calls, taking night call and making hospital rounds really did impact my mood as well as my breastfeeding. Although I enjoyed breastfeeding,  I could not figure out how to find any time to pump between patients (talk about running late) to keep my milk supply up. So….I eventually made the decision that in order to keep working I would need to stop breast feeding, which was a bit traumatic for me…..in retrospect I was tougher on myself than I needed to be, but 30 years ago I didn’t realize the numerous other difficult parenting decisions that lay ahead.

Interestingly, a new study just published in Pediatrics is what made me ponder all of this.  Many studies have shown that mothers may have trouble continuing to breast feed after returning to work. This latest study from Australia actually found that the amount of time to return to employment was actually “far less significant than the number of hours a woman worked”.  The study found that working 19 hours or less per week was associated with a higher likelihood to continue breastfeeding.  Those women who returned to a work week of 19 hours or less “experienced no decline in the likelihood that they were breastfeeding regardless of when they returned to work and they were more likely to sustain breastfeeding as well”.  In other words longer breastfeeding, a win win for mother and child. 

As more and more women are employed during their child bearing years, the ongoing debate surrounding the appropriate length of time for maternity leave continues. While there have been many studies to show the importance of family leave after the birth of a baby ( better bonding, less post partum depression) this study is one of the first to show the benefit of a reduction of hours worked upon re-entry to the workplace.  It is my hope that this research may open the door for discussions examining the feasibility of reduced work hours for women who return to work after giving birth.  This new data may be pivotal in improving longer breastfeeding rates in the U.S.  

I am sure many women, although not included in the study,  who have juggled a career and breast feeding would agree.

Your Toddler

Seven Tips For Toddler Discipline

2.15 to read

Toddler-hood is a particularly vexing time for parents because this is the age at which children start to become more independent and discover themselves as individuals. Yet they still have a limited ability to communicate and reason. "They understand that their actions matter -- they can make things happen," says Claire Lerner, LCSW-C, child development specialist and director of parenting resources for the organization Zero to Three. "This leads them to want to make their imprint on the world and assert themselves in a way they didn't when they were a baby. The problem is they have very little self-control and they're not rational thinkers. It's a very challenging combination." So how do you deal with a child who screams every time you try to give him or her a bath, and whose vocabulary seems to consist of just one word -- "no"? Here are a few simple toddler discipline strategies to help make life easier for both you and your child. Toddler Discipline Secret No. 1: Be Consistent Order and routine give young children a safe haven from what they view as an overwhelming and unpredictable world, says Lerner. "When there's some predictability and routine, it makes children feel much more safe and secure, and they tend to be much more behaved and calm because they know what to expect." Try to keep to the same schedule every day. That means having consistent nap times, mealtimes, and bedtimes, as well as times when your toddler is free to just run around and have fun. When you do have to make a change, it helps to warn your child in advance. Telling your child, "Aunt Jean is going to watch you tonight while Mommy and Daddy go out for a little bit" will prepare her for a slightly different routine, and will hopefully prevent a scene at bedtime. Consistency is also important when it comes to discipline. When you say "no hitting" the first time your child smacks another child on the playground, you also need to say "no hitting" the second, third, and fourth times your child does it. Toddler Discipline Secret No. 2: Avoid Stressful Situations By the time children reach the toddler stage, you've spent enough time with them to know their triggers. The most common ones are hunger, sleepiness, and quick changes of venue. With a little advance planning, you can avoid these potential meltdown scenarios and keep things relatively calm. "You have to anticipate, which means you don't go to the grocery store when your child needs a nap," says Lisa Asta, MD, a pediatrician in Walnut Creek, Calif., and associate clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco. Try to make sure your child is home at naptimes, bedtimes, and mealtimes. If you are out, always keep food on hand in case of a sudden hunger attack. Keep excursions short (that means finding another restaurant if the one you've chosen has an hour-long wait, or doing your grocery shopping at times when the lines are shortest). Finally, plan ahead so you don't have to rush (particularly when you need to get your child to preschool and yourself to work in the mornings). You can ease transitions by involving your child in the process. That can be as simple as setting an egg timer for five minutes, and saying that when it rings it's time to take a bath or get dressed, or giving your child a choice of whether to wear the red shirt or the blue shirt to school. Toddler Discipline Secret No. 3: Think Like a Toddler Toddlers aren't mini-adults. They have trouble understanding many of the things we take for granted, like how to follow directions and behave appropriately. Seeing the scenario from a toddler's perspective can help prevent a tantrum. "You might say, 'I know, Derek, you don't like getting into the car seat ... but it's what we have to do,'" Lerner explains. "So you're not coddling, but you're validating their feelings. You have to set the limit, but you do it in a way that respects the child and you use it as an opportunity to help them learn to cope with life's frustrations and rules and regulations." Giving choices also shows that you respect your toddler and recognize the child's feelings. Asking your child if he or she wants to bring a favorite book in the car, or take along a snack, can make the child feel as though he or she has some control over the situation while you remain in charge, Lerner says. Toddler Discipline Secret No. 4: Practice the Art of Distraction Make your toddler's short attention span work for you. When your child throws the ball against the dining room wall for the 10th time after you've said to stop, it's pretty easy to redirect your child to a more productive activity, like trading the ball for a favorite book or moving the game outside. "Parents need to create an environment that is most conducive to good toddler behavior," advises Rex Forehand, PhD, the Heinz and Rowena Ansbacher Professor of Psychology at the University of Vermont and author of Parenting the Strong-Willed Child. "If they're into something they're not supposed to do, the idea is not to punish them but to get another activity going or pick them up and put them in another room." Toddler Discipline Secret No. 5: Give Your Child a Break Time-outs are one of the foundations of child discipline, but they may not be the best approach for the toddler stage. The negative implication of being sent away can teach kids that they're bad, rather than promote good behavior. If you do give your child a time-out, limit it to just a minute or two at this age. Instead of calling it a time-out, which can be confusing to children under 3, refer to it as something more positive. Lerner suggests creating a "cozy corner," a safe place, free from distractions and stimulation, where your child can just chill out for a few minutes until he or she can get back in control. That time away can help you regroup, as well. Correct bad behaviors, but also take the time to praise good behaviors. "If you don't tell your child when they're doing the right thing, sometimes they'll do the wrong thing just to get attention," Asta says. When you tell your toddler he or she has done something good, there's a good chance your child will want to do it again. Toddler Discipline Secret No. 6: Stay Calm When you're standing in the middle of the mall, looking down at your child who's screaming on the floor, and trying to ignore the stares of the shoppers around you, it's easy for your blood pressure to reach the boiling point. It's hard to stay calm, but losing control will quickly escalate an already stressful situation. Give yourself some time to cool off, advises Forehand. "Otherwise, you're venting your own anger. In the end that's going to make you as a parent feel worse and guilty, and it's not going to do your child any good." "I call it the "Stepford Wife" approach," Lerner says. As your child screams, say, 'I know, I know,' but stay completely calm as you pick him up. Don't show any emotion. Sometimes the best tactic is to ignore the behavior entirely. "You just literally act like they're not doing what they're doing. You ignore the behavior you want to stop," Lerner says. When your child realizes that his screaming fit is not going to get him a second lollipop or your attention, eventually he'll get tired of yelling. Your child may drive you so close to the breaking point that you're tempted to spank him, but most experts warn against the practice. "When we spank, kids learn that physical punishment is acceptable. And so we are modeling exactly what we don't want our kids to do," says Forehand. At the toddler stage, redirection and brief breaks are far more effective discipline tactics, Forehand says. Toddler Discipline Secret No. 7: Know When to Give In Certain things in a toddler's life are nonnegotiable. She has to eat, brush her teeth, and ride in a car seat. She also has to take baths once in a while. Hitting and biting are never OK. But many other issues aren't worth the headache of an argument. Pick your battles. "You have to decide whether it's worth fighting about, and about half the time it's not worth fighting about," Asta says. That means it's OK to let your son wear his superhero costume to the grocery store, or read The Giving Tree 10 times in a row. Once he gets what he wants, you can gradually get him to shift in another direction -- like wearing another outfit or picking out a different book to read. Finally, know that it's OK to feel stressed out by your toddler sometimes. "Realize that none of us as parents is perfect -- we do the best we can. There are going to be days that we're better at this than other days," Forehand says. "But if we parent consistently and have consistent rules, then we're going to see more good days than bad days."

Parenting

Sharing Too Much About Your Kids on Social Media

1:45

In a few days from now, your social media site of preference will be flooded with pictures of young children in cute Halloween costumes out for an evening of trick or treating.  It’s safe to say, online landscapes have replaced the old hard-cover family album. Relatives, friends and even strangers are just a click away from viewing your child’s most significant moments.

While many parents often keep a watchful eye on their kids social media use, they might want to think about how much personal information they are sharing about their family.

"This is all so new. Our parents didn't deal with this," said Dr. Bahareh Keith, an assistant of pediatrics at the University of Florida College of Medicine, in Gainesville.

Before social media, parents might embarrass their kids by showing old photo albums to a few family members and friends.  Now, the things parents disclose online -- the good and not so good -- leave a lasting "digital footprint," Keith explained.

The researchers cite an astonishing statistic in their review: Studies have shown that 92 percent of 2-year-olds in the United States have an online presence, and about one-third make their first appearance on social media within 24 hours of their birth.

Not only do parents share the “Hallmark” moments in their children’s lives, but some parents also share personal information about their child’s struggles with behavioral issues that can end up in the public domain. Social media outlets such as Facebook allow friends of “friends” to view your posts. You may or may not know who these people are. Public information about your child’s personal behavior, Keith points out, can have psychological repercussions for kids.

On a more sinister note, public information about your home life can help thieves and pedophiles link together a profile on your family - such as where your child attends school, when you are at work or on vacation, your child’s most vulnerable tendencies and a host of other things you’d rather strangers not know.

According to Keith, there has been little research on the issue, probably because it's so new. Her team did a review of the medical and legal literature on the subject, to come up with some guidelines for parents.

For now, she offered some advice on how to post wisely:

·      Never share pictures of your child in "any state of undress."

·      Be careful about posts that give your child's precise location.

·      If you are going online for help with your child's behavioral issues, keep any information sharing anonymous.

Be sure to understand the privacy policies of the sites you post on. Simply limiting your Facebook posts to "friends" is not enough, Keith said. If someone else is tagged in a photo, for example, the friends of that person may see it.

Keith says the review is not to scare parents from sharing family photos or bragging about their children’s accomplishments online, but to use caution in what you share and when.

"We're not saying 'don't share,' " she said. "Just share wisely."

That's not only to keep kids safe, but to respect their privacy, according to Keith.

With older kids, she said, always ask if it's OK to post a photo or share a story.

With younger kids, try to think ahead. "Look forward," Keith said. "Ask yourself, at the age of 14, will my child be OK with this? If you're in doubt, don't post it."

It's natural for parents to focus on their kids when they're using social media, said Dr. David Lloyd-Hill, chair of the AAP's Council on Communications and Media.

"If you're a parent," he said, "the most important and exciting things in your life are probably centered on your kids."

But while those posts may be well meaning, Lloyd-Hill agreed that parents should think before they share and take some sensible precautions.

The bigger concern, he said, is children's privacy, and whether the images and information parents choose to share will hurt their child in some way -- now or years down the road.

"Yes, we need to be monitoring our kids' social media posts," Lloyd-Hill said. "But we also need to look at our own."

Keith is scheduled to present her findings at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), in San Francisco this Friday. Research presented at meetings is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Story source: Amy Norton, https://consumer.healthday.com/health-technology-information-18/misc-computer-health-news-150/what-not-to-post-online-about-your-kids-716055.html

 

Daily Dose

Twisted Neck?

1:30 to read

Under the heading of “continuing to learn” every day…comes a new case.

 

A patient of mine who is 4 years old was playing with his brother the other morning while his mother was making their breakfast. He was a “well child” and woke up in a good mood, ready to eat and go to preschool.  She could see the boys playing while she was cooking and then suddenly the 4 year old started to scream and cry that his “neck hurt”.  At first she thought “he was pretending or over reacting” as there did not overtly seem to be anything wrong. The only thing she noticed is that he refused to turn his neck and held his head in an awkward position.

 

He continued to cry and actually scream - so she tried to calm him down and gave him some ibuprofen as well. Despite this he would not move his neck and was unconsolable, to the point that she almost took him to the ER but instead she brought him to the office.  He was noted to be crying and seemed uncomfortable and refused to move his neck at all.  His exam was otherwise normal. Even with careful questioning there was no history of trauma. He had slept through the night before this had occurred. He had a cold several weeks before, but had since improved. He did not have a fever.

 

He seemed to be in such pain that he was sent for neck X-rays which were read as normal. But he continued to be miserable….so who do you call?? 

 

I spoke to a pediatric orthopedic surgeon and he said he really did not have any ideas. Next call, the pediatric neurosurgeon. After hearing the symptoms he immediately said that he thought this little boy had “rotatory dislocation/subluxation” of the two upper cervical vertebrae in his neck (C-1 and C-2). He explained to me that in most cases the displacement resolves spontaneously, but in some cases the child continues to be uncomfortable as there is associated spasm of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, which causes the torticollis. (twisted neck).It may be seen in children after a recent upper respiratory infection and is then called Grisel Syndrome.

 

Treatment for the acute condition…pain control and muscle relaxation.  This was all news to me and I had to go to textbook (online of course) to even read about the condition.  The neurosurgeon walked me through treatment and the child was sent home on a very low dose of valium and continued ibuprofen. When I spoke to the mother later that evening the child was already more comfortable and had started to move his neck. 

 

I called her the following morning and she said that he had not required any further valium and slept well and was actually on his way to preschool! WOW….I was thrilled he was better so quickly and that I was that much “smarter”. Wonder if I will ever see rotatory subluxation of the cervical vertebra again? I’ll be ready.

Your Child

Does a Full Moon Make Kids Hyper?

1:30

There are lots of strange things associated with a full moon such as werewolves come out, it causes lunacy, blue moons are actually colored blue and a full moon makes kids more hyper than usual.

A new study actually looked at whether a full moon has any impact on children’s behavior and found that they do sleep a little less, but only by a few minutes.

The study failed to find a link between the occurrence of the full moon and kids' activity levels, debunking the myth that kids are more hyper during a full moon.

The study "provides solid evidence … that the associations between moon phases and children's sleep duration/activity behaviors are not meaningful from a public health standpoint," the researchers, from the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute in Ottawa, Canada, wrote in the March 24 issue of the journal Frontiers in Pediatrics.

The idea that the moon effects people’s behavior goes back to ancient times, but studies have found no evidence that that is true.

In the new study, researchers analyzed information from more than 5,800 children, ages 9 to 11, from 12 countries around the world (Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Finland, India, Kenya, Portugal, South Africa, the United Kingdom and the United States).

Unlike much of the previous research on children's sleep, the new study did not rely on parents or the kids themselves to report how much sleep the children got. Instead, the children wore accelerometers — which are devices similar to fitness trackers that record body movement and can be used to monitor sleep — 24 hours a day, for at least seven days.

Results showed that children's activity levels — including the amount of time they spent doing high- and low-intensity activity, and their sedentary time — were about the same during a full moon and new moon (the phase of the moon when it is not visible from Earth).

However, children's sleep time was about 5 minutes shorter on nights with a full moon, compared to nights with a new moon. This is about 1 percent of children's total sleep time, the study said. From a health standpoint, such a small effect "is unlikely to be important," the researchers said.

Why children got a bit less sleep on nights with a full moon wasn’t clear. One reason could be the brightness of the moon during that time.

The study was conducted over a short time and did not track the children for a full month. The finding does not prove that the full moon causes children to sleep for shorter periods, the researchers said.

Future studies are needed "to determine if the human biology is in any way synchronized with the lunar cycle," or if the full moon has a greater influence on certain groups of people, the researchers said. "Whether there is science behind the myth or not, the moon mystery will continue to fascinate civilizations in the years to come."

Story source: Rachel Rettner, http://www.livescience.com/54433-full-moon-children-sleep.html

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DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

Can q-tips harm your baby's ear?

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