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Your Child

Kids & Lawn Mower Injuries

2:00

It’s lawn-mowing season again and a recent study urges parents to make sure that their children are not part of the seasonal ritual.

The Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital found that 4800 children a year go the emergency room to be treated for a lawn mower related injury. On an average, that turns out to be about 13 kids a day.

The good news is that many parents and grandparents are getting the message about lawn mower safety. There has been a decrease in lawn mower injuries suffered by children in the last two decades.  However, this cause for serious injuries is still a concern.

The way children are injured by lawn mowers varies by age. Children younger than five years are more likely than older children to be injured from touching a hot surface, from a “back-over” injury, or as a bystander or passenger. Children age 5-17 years were more likely than younger children to be struck by or cut by the lawn mower or a projectile.

The researchers suggest that to help prevent back-over injuries, which are often the most devastating lawn mower injuries to young children, every ride-on mower should be equipped with a no-mow-in-reverse mechanism with the over-ride switch for this feature located behind the operator’s seat, which forces the person operating the ride-on mower to look behind them before backing up with the blades engaged.

“While we are happy to see that the number of lawn mower-related injuries has declined over the years, it is important for families to realize that these injuries still occur frequently during warm weather months,” said Gary Smith, MD, DrPH, senior author of the study and director of the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. “Improvements in lawn mower design during the last few decades are likely an important contributing factor in the decrease in injuries. We would like to see manufacturers continue to improve design and include additional needed safety features on all mowers.”

Injury prevention experts recommend these rules to help prevent mower-related injuries to children and adults:

  • Teach and supervise teens. Children should be at least 12 years old to operate a push mower and at least 16 years old before using a ride-on mower. An adult should supervise teens before they are allowed to operate a lawn mower on their own.
  • Kid-free zone. Children should never be passengers on ride-on mowers and children younger than 6 years of age should be kept indoors during mowing. Never let children play on or near a lawn mower, even when it is not in use.
  • Before you mow. Pick up any stones or other objects in the grass. Objects thrown by a lawn mower can cause severe eye and other injuries. Put on protective eyewear and make sure you are wearing sturdy shoes. 
  • While you mow. When using a walk-behind lawn mower, use a mower with a control that stops it from moving forward if the handle is released. Always mow going forward. If you absolutely have to mow in reverse, always look behind you before you start backing up.
  • Turn it off. Wait for the blades to stop completely before removing the grass catcher, unclogging the discharge chute, or crossing gravel roads. 

The study was published in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine.

Story source: http://www.nationwidechildrens.org/news-room-articles/lawn-mower-injuries-send-13-children-to-the-emergency-department-every-day?contentid=163616

Your Child

“Opt-Out” of Letting Schools Sell Your Child’s Personal Information!

2:00

If your child is in school, you may have unknowingly given the school the right to sell your child’s private information to data brokers and marketing companies. It happens every year and many parents don’t know they could have signed a form preventing the sale.

Schools are allowed by federal law to sell your child’s personal information to anyone unless you fill out an “opt-out “ form. If you don’t fill it out, personal information such as your child’s name, address, email, telephone number, age, gender, height and weight and photo can be sold.

Not only can your child be subjected to a ridiculous amount of advertising from marketing companies, anyone can use that information to locate your child if they really want to find him or her. They can also contact your child through personal emails or phone and have a picture to identify them.

"Directory information may sound innocuous, but it can include sensitive information about each student that is quite detailed," said Pam Dixon, executive director of the World Privacy Forum. "And after the school releases this data, it is considered to be public information and you've lost control of it. I don't think most parents know this."

Under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA), a student's directory information includes home address, email address, telephone number, date and place of birth, height and weight, the clubs or sports teams they've joined - even a photograph.

FERPA was written before the creation of the Internet, when a student's personal information was stored in a file cabinet and privacy was not such a big issue. Today, the data is just what a stalker, abuser or identity thief needs.

FERPA also gives parents the right to see what “directory information” the school has about their children. You have a right to block or limit access to that information. But, the window of time you can do that is short, sometimes just a few weeks after school begins. Once the time frame expires, you cannot stop the release of your child’s personal information until the next school year.

This is especially important for domestic violence survivors who are hiding from their abuser. Information that's released without their knowledge could jeopardize their safety.

"When there are situations where the survivor has left with the child and has custody of the child and they're living elsewhere, they want to know that their abuser doesn't know where they are living," said Kaofeng Lee, deputy director of the Safety Net Project at the National Network to End Domestic Violence. "If this information is available, the abuser could get access to where this child is going to school which will pinpoint exactly where the family is now living and make it possible to find them."

Many schools do not do a good job in letting parents know about the form. Some have even neglected to provide the form to parents and some schools have worded the forms in such a way as to discouraged parents from signing them.

It’s a battle for your child’s data and parents need to be aware that they have the right and the means to protect that information from getting out to marketing firms and individuals.

Congress is scheduled to review FERPA to see what further privacy protections are needed to keep students and families’ information private in the digital age. Until then, parents have to seek out and make sure that the opt-out forms are signed, sealed and delivered.

A warning to parents; this isn’t a one-time fix either. You must sign these forms every year that your child attends school.

Source: Herb Weisbaum, http://www.nbcnews.com/business/consumer/student-privacy-n423466

 

 

 

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Parenting News You Can Use

Your Child

Safety Recalls: Finger Paints, Baby Bathtubs, Strollers and More

2:00

The American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) online Gateway issue has listed several children’s products that have been recalled due to health and safety concerns.

The list includes

·      Sargent Art tempera finger paints, Lil’ Luxuries Whirlpool, Bubbling Spa & Shower

·      Peg Perego’s 850 Polaris Sportsman ATV-style ride on toy

·      Mamas & Papas’ Armadillo Flip and Armadillo Flip XT strollers

·      Fiddle Diddles LullaBelay adjustable car seat strap system

·      Chimparoo brand Trek baby carriers

Sargent Art tempera finger paints: About 2.8 million units of paint have been recalled. The paint can contain harmful bacteria, putting children with weak immune systems at risk of serious illness. Those with healthy immune systems may not be affected.

Recalled are 13 types of Sargent Art tempera and finger paints. All colors and sizes of the following types of paints are recalled: Art-Time brand of tempera paint, washable finger paint, washable fluorescent finger paint, washable fluorescent tempera paint, washable glitter finger paint, washable paint and fluorescent tempera paint.

Sold at: Hobby Lobby, Wal-Mart and other stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com and ShopSargentArt.com from May 2015 to June 2016 for $1 to $8.

Stop using the paints and contact the company for a refund at 800-827-8081 or visit www.sargentart.com.

Lil’ Luxuries Whirlpool, Bubbling Spa & Shower: About 86,000 units have been recalled. Fabric slings can come off the infant bathtubs, and infants can fall or drown.

Lil’ Luxuries Whirlpool, Bubbling Spa & Shower is a battery-operated whirlpool bath with motorized jets intended for use with children from birth to 2 years. The product has a fabric sling on a plastic frame onto which the infant is placed for bathing. The fabric sling on the tub does not have a white plastic clip to attach the headrest area of the fabric sling to the plastic frame. Recalled bathtubs have numbers 18840, 18850, 18863 or 18873 with date codes starting with 1210, 1211, 1212, 1301, 1302, 1303, 1304, 1305, 1306, 1307 or 1308, which stand for the two-digit year followed by the two-digit month, on the fabric sling.

The products were sold at Toys R Us/Babies R Us and other juvenile product specialty stores nationwide from October 2012 through October 2013 for about $60. The tubs also might have been sold secondhand.

Stop using the fabric sling in the tub, and contact the company for a replacement sling with a white plastic attachment clip. You can call 844-612-4254 or visit http://bit.ly/2f1wQNG.

Peg Perego’s 850 Polaris Sportsman ATV-style ride on toy, About 3,000 toys were recalled. A relay on the circuit board can fail causing the vehicle’s motor to overheat and catch fire.

Recalled are Peg Perego’s 850 Polaris Sportsman ride-on, 24-volt battery-operated toy vehicles for children ages 5 to 7 years. The ATV-style vehicles for two people are silver, red and black and have four wheels, a flip-up backrest for the back passenger and a front and rear luggage rack. Vehicles with date codes 651016, 651017, 651020, 651021, 651022, 651023, 651024, 651027, 651028, 651029, 651030, 660304, 660305, 661123, 661124, 661125 and 661130 are recalled. The date code is under the vehicle seat. Sportsman Twin and 850 EFI are printed on the side and Polaris is on the side of the seat.

Items were sold at online retailers including Amazon.com, Cabelas.com, Target.com, ToysRUs.com and Walmart.com from October 2014 through April 2016 for $500 to $600.

Remedy is to Contact Peg Perego for a replacement circuit board with instructions, including shipping. Call 877-737-3464, email 850recall@pegperego.com or visit https://us.pegperego.com/cs/recalls/.

Mamas & Papas’ Armadillo Flip and Armadillo Flip XT strollers: About 3,000 strollers have been recalled. A loose latch on the stroller can cause the infant in the seat to tip back unexpectedly and possibly fall out when facing the parent.

Recalled are Mamas & Papas’ Armadillo Flip and Armadillo Flip XT strollers. All models are folding strollers for one infant. They come in black, teal and navy and weigh about 22 pounds. Lot number ranges for recalled Armadillo Flip strollers are 00814 through 00416. Lot number ranges for the Flip XT are 01214 through 00416. The number is printed on the sewn-in label on the stroller.

Strollers were sold at Albee Baby, Babies ‘R’ Us, Buy Buy Baby and other stores nationwide and online at www.mamasandpapas.com and www.amazon.com from December 2014 through July 2016 for $500.

Stop using the strollers and contact the company for a repair at 800-309-6312 or visit www.mamasandpapas.com/us.

Fiddle Diddles LullaBelay adjustable car seat strap system: About 250 units have been recalled. The carabiners attached to the strap system have small parts inside that can come loose and be swallowed and choked on by young children.

The Fiddle Diddles LullaBelay adjustable car seat strap system with model number LB1001 includes two fabric straps, carabiner hardware, a mesh car seat cover and a tote bag. The carabiners are used to hang a car seat from a shopping cart. The model number is printed on the straps.

They were sold at Amazon.com from November 2015 through June 2016 and Fiddlediddles.com from May through June 2015 and at Zoolikins stores in Arizona from November 2015 through June 2016 for about $40.

You can contact the company for a repair kit with three new carabiners. Call 888-741-2957, email info@fiddlediddles.com or visit http://fiddlediddles.com/replacement-kit.html.

Chimparoo brand Trek baby carriers: About 130 units are being recalled. The carriers’ side strap can loosen unexpectedly from the buckle, and the child can fall out.

Recalled are Chimparoo brand Trek baby carriers that allow the user to carry a baby tummy to tummy, on the hip or on the back. The 100% twill fabric carriers were sold in 18 solid, striped and pattern color combinations. The carriers attach to the wearer’s body with adjustable straps made of polypropylene webbing and plastic buckles. “Chimparoo” is printed on the upper right hand corner of the carrier. “Trek” is embroidered on the belt.

The carriers were sold at Children’s boutique stores, such as Granola Babies, of Costa Mesa, Calif., Eat/Sleep/Play, of Summerville, S.C., and Top to Bottom, of Omaha, Neb., and online at www.Amazon.com and www.Chimaparoo.ca from May through July 2016 for about $170.

Contact the company for a replacement buckle for the baby carrier’s side-buckle. Call 855-289-5343, email safety@Chimparoo.com or visit www.Chimparoo.ca/en/recall.

Story source: Trisha Korioth, at http://www.aappublications.org/news/2016/11/17/HealthAlerts111716

Daily Dose

Parenting is Hard Work!

1:30 to read

Being a mom (as well as a dad) is one of the hardest jobs in the world....and as many a person has pointed out, it pays a lot less than minimum wage.  But, it is also the best job in the world.

I have the privilege of seeing a lot of mothers everyday. From the time they come in with their brand new infant until their children have graduated from college....mothers worry about the “job” they are doing.  For a new mother who is already hearing that voice in her head...”am I doing this right?”, 

it is very reassuring for her to hear me say, “you can’t mess this up yet!” Your baby loves you unconditionally, just like you do them.

But as your child gets older it takes a great deal of self-esteem to sometimes feel as if you are “doing it right”.  Children of all ages can sometimes bring us to our knees...how can a small child know just the right thing to say, and that teenager...well, enough said.So, I like to tell them my own stories about raising children and my days of feeling like a failure, or at the least an inadequate mother....especially as your children point this out to you.

When my oldest and very verbal son was about 6, he was riding in the front seat with me (crazy huh) and I stopped the car in front of our neighbor’s house where our 4 year old son was heading to play. I rolled down the window to give the 4 year old some instructions when the eldest son leaned over and started telling his younger brother what to do. So. in my best “mommy voice” I tell the 6 year old that I am the mother and will handle this, to which he doesn’t miss a beat and responds ”if you were doing a better job of being a mommy I wouldn’t have to help you!”  Enough said.

It takes a lot of self esteem and true grit to be a mom. Hang in there.  We all have those days when we know we are doing our best and our kids disagree. 

Your Teen

FDA to Regulate E-cigarettes, Raise Age for Purchasing

2:00

Cigarette smoking among teens and young adults has been on a slight decline in the past few years, but e-cigarette use has been rapidly increasing.

Because there are no regulations and scant information on the products used to fuel e-cigarettes, many leading health organizations, including the American Academy of Pediatrics have been urging the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) to bring e-cigarettes and liquid nicotine under its authority.

The U.S. government has responded and taken action. The FDA issued a tough set of rules for the e-cigarette industry that included banning sales to anyone under 18, requiring package warning labels, and making all products—even those currently on the market—subject to government approval.

For many teen and health organizations, the ruling has been long overdue.

Though the product-approval process will be phased in during three years, that will be little solace to the fledgling but fast-growing $3.5 billion industry that has, until Aug. 8 when the rules take effect, largely been unregulated and dominated by small manufacturers and vape shops.

Many of the vape shops, device manufacturers and liquid nicotine producers are not happy with the change.

“This is going to be a grim day in the history of tobacco-harm reduction,” said Greg Conley, president of the American Vaping Association, an industry-funded advocacy group. “It will be a day where thousands of small businesses will be contemplating whether they will continue to stay in business and employ people.”

In June, the FDA proposed requiring warning labels and childproof packaging because of an increase in nicotine exposure and poisoning incidents. The agency could move to regulate advertising or flavors such as cotton candy and watermelon that also might appeal to youth.

“We’re looking at the flavor issue with e-cigarettes,” said FDA Tobacco Center Director Mitch Zeller during a news conference. Later, he said, that while the agency was aware of “anecdotal reports” that e-cigarettes have helped smokers kick their habit; those benefits were outweighed by concerns about youth using the devices.

E-cigarettes are not the only tobacco related products that will come under the control of the FDA. Unregulated tobacco items, including pipe tobacco and water-pipe tobacco, will also fall under the supervision of the FDA.

The FDA has been regulating cigarettes since Congress granted it oversight of traditional smokes with the 2009 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act.

“Today’s announcement is an important step in the fight for a tobacco-free generation—it will help us catch up with changes in the marketplace, put into place rules that protect our kids and give adults information they need to make informed decisions,” Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell said in a statement.

Most researchers agree e-cigarettes are less harmful than cigarettes because, unlike cigarettes, they don’t combust. Studies have shown that when traditional cigarettes combust they release more than 60 carcinogens. But the long-term effects of using the electronic devices remain largely unknown, and many anti-tobacco groups and public health officials are concerned they could become a gateway to traditional smoking.

Anti-tobacco groups have been frustrated with FDA, saying the agency has taken far too long to finalize its rules.

Concerns escalated when a study published in August by the Journal of the American Medical Association found ninth-graders who used e-cigarettes were 2½ times as likely as peers to have smoked traditional cigarettes a year later.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported in April that e-cigarette use tripled among U.S. teenagers in 2014.

The AAP issued its recommendations on tobacco and e-cigarettes in late 2015.

In a press release, the organization said it strongly recommends the minimum age to purchase tobacco products, including e-cigarettes, should be increased to age 21 nationwide.

"Tobacco use continues to be a major health threat to children, adolescents and adults," said Karen M. Wilson, MD, MPH, FAAP, chair of the AAP Section on Tobacco Control and section head of Pediatric Hospital Medicine at Children's Hospital Colorado. "The developing brains of children and teens are particularly vulnerable to nicotine, which is why the growing popularity of e-cigarettes among adolescents is so alarming and dangerous to their long-term health."

Under the new rules, e-cigarette manufacturers would have up to two years to continue to sell their products while they submit an application to the FDA.

Story sources: Tripp Mickle, Tom Burton, http://www.wsj.com/articles/fda-to-regulate-e-cigarettes-ban-sales-to-minors-1462455060

https://www.aap.org

 

Your Toddler

Is Your Child a Biter?

2.00 to read

At some time or another your sweet child is going to bite or wallop someone, most likely another kid. And yes, it's embarrassing to have to pull your child off another or to apologize to grandma because her grandchild just took a chunk out of her arm. 

Know that you’re not alone - all kids bite and /or hit. The key to stopping aggression in children is teaching them that there are alternative ways to handle frustration and biting is not acceptable behavior.

Not all biting stems from anger. The younger the child, the less chance that biting is an aggressive behavior. It can also be a simple case of exploration. Young children bite for many reasons, from painful gums because they are teething to seeing what kind of reaction they get. Children between the ages of one and three typically go through a biting phase they eventually outgrow.

While biting may be a normal phase kids go through, it’s something you want to discourage.

Let’s look at some of the reasons kids bite.

  • They're in pain. When babies bite, typically it's because they're teething. They're just doing it to relieve the pain of their swollen, tender gums.
  • They're exploring their world. Very young children use their mouths to explore, just as they use their hands. Just about everything infants or toddlers pick up eventually winds up in their mouths. Kids this age aren't yet able to prevent themselves from biting the object of their interest.
  • They're looking for a reaction. Part of exploration is curiosity. Toddlers experiment to see what kind of reaction their actions will provoke. They'll bite down on a friend or sibling to hear the surprised exclamation, not realizing how painful the experience is for that person.
  • They're craving attention. In older kids, biting is just one of several bad behaviors used to get attention. When a child feels ignored, discipline is at least one way of getting noticed -- even if the attention is negative rather than positive.
  • They're frustrated. Biting, like hitting, is a way for some children to assert themselves when they're still too young to express feelings effectively through words. To your child, biting is a way to get back a favorite toy, tell you that he or she is unhappy, or let another child know that he or she wants to be left alone.

So, how do you prevent or teach your child that they can’t go through life biting others?

You start with consistent prevention and move on to discipline if they are older.

  • If your baby is teething, make sure to always have a cool teething ring or washcloth on hand so he or she will be less likely to sink teeth into someone's arm.
  • Avoid situations in which your child can get irritable enough to bite. Make sure that all of your child's needs -- including eating and naptime -- are taken care of before you go out to play. Bring along a snack to soothe your child if he or she gets cranky from being hungry.
  • As soon as your child is old enough, encourage your child to use words such as “I'm angry with you" or "That's my toy" instead of biting. Other ways to express frustration or anger include hugging (not hitting) a stuffed animal or punching a pillow. Sometimes redirection is helpful; shortening activities or giving your child a break can help prevent the rising frustration that can lead to biting and other bad behaviors.
  • Give your child enough of your time throughout the day (for example, by reading or playing together), so he or she doesn't bite just to get attention. Extra attention is especially important when your child is going through a major life change, such as a move or welcoming a baby sibling. If your child is prone to biting, keep an eye on any playmates and step in when an altercation appears to be brewing.

You’ve done all that is possible to prevent another biting situation, and low and behold your child is biting another. What do you do then?

When your child bites, firmly let your child know that this behavior is not acceptable by saying, "No. We don't bite!" Explain that biting hurts the other person. Then remove your child from the situation and give the child time to calm down. It’s important that you remain calm.

Seeing your child bite another is naturally going to create an unpleasant reaction in you. As soon as you witness a biting episode, your body tenses, your heart races, and even if you don't actually scream, you really want to. The angrier you are, the tenser the situation becomes. You are much more likely to strike your child when you let your anger get the best of you. Take a deep breath, assess the situation and intervene calmly. Remove your child, let him or her calm down and explain (yes, once again) that biting is not going to be tolerated. If your child is old enough to understand time-out, this is a good time to use it. If not, remove the child from the temptation. Playtime is over.

One way some parents handle biting is to bite their own child to show them how painful it can be. Doing what you are telling your child not to do sends a mixed message. It’s similar to hitting your child and then saying “don’t hit others.” Most likely your child will experience how painful it is because another child will bite them someday.

The point is not so much that biting is painful, the action itself is unkind, unproductive and wrong.

When biting becomes a habit or continues past the age 4 or 5, it may stem from a more serious emotional problem. This is the time to ask for help from your pediatrician, family doctor or a child psychologist.

If your child is bitten, wash the area with soap and water. If the bite is bleeding and the wound appears to be deep, call your child’s doctor. The bite may need medical treatment, which could include antibiotics or a tetanus shot or both.

Biting is a horrible habit to get into and a difficult one to stop. Start teaching your child early that momma and daddy are not putting up with it and that there are better ways to explore the world and handle frustration.

Source: http://www.webmd.com/parenting/guide/stop-children-from-biting

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Heart Health

Heart Healthy Children

Daily Dose

Read To Your Kids

1:30 to read

I know that there seems to be a “national” day for almost everything these days…we just celebrated National Dog Day! (who doesn’t love a dog…but not all families want, have space or  extra income to care for a dog). But there is one thing all parents can do and celebrate very day regardless of socioeconomic background, ethnicity, or geographic location…they can read to their child in the first 5 years of life (and maybe even longer!) 

Try reading to your child 15 minutes a day. The benefits are endless!  Seems like an easy enough “to do” and something that all parents can start from the time their baby is an infant. Newborns need to hear their parents voices and  language early on as a baby’s brain grows exponentially and will actually double in size in the first year of life alone.

A recent study conducted by You.Gov for the Read Aloud Campaign found that only about 46% of parents read aloud with their child every day and only 34% do so for the recommended 15 minutes.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has also recommended that all children, beginning at birth, are read to every day. In another survey while six in 10 ( 62%) of parents admit to receiving advice to read aloud to their child only 8% actually followed through.  When asked why they have not read to their child parents site “I can’t find the time in the day”, while over half of the parents surveyed say “their child watches TV or uses a tablet at home rather than being read to”. Some parents say, “their child won’t sit still” to be read aloud to.  But if you realized the head start you are giving your child….could you find the time?

Scientists know that a baby’s and toddler’s brain is making huge connections among the 100 billion neurons they are born with.  By the age 3 there will be about 1,000 trillion connections between those neurons.  These are also the critical years in the development of a child’s language skills.   A child will quadruple the number of words they know between the ages of 1 and 2 years.  Yes, they will mimic everything….even words you wished they had not heard so be careful.

Reading aloud is one of the single most important things a parent or caregiver can do to help a child prepare for learning.  Children who have been exposed to books while listening and reading daily with a parent get a head start in language and literacy skills.  Unfortunately,  more than one in three children begin kindergarten without the necessary skills of listening and learning.  Some are at such a disadvantage that they may not be able to “catch up”.

So, I find myself giving books as baby gifts more and more these days - as who doesn’t have a favorite book or two that make timeless gifts (that may even be passed on to the next generation).  Nursery rhymes, Good Night Moon, Pat the Bunny are a few of my favorites as well as all books by Dr. Seuss and Eric Carle. 

So make it a new habit whether your child is 1 day, 1 month, 1 year or older….read aloud 15 minutes a day and before you know it your child will be reading to you!!!

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