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Your Teen

Young Male Athletes, Parental Pressure and Doping

1:45

When 129 young male athletes, whose average age was 17, were asked what would make them consider “doping” as a way to boost their athletic ability – the majority said parental pressure.

A new study from the University of Kent in England asked the young male athletes about their attitudes on "doping" -- the use of prohibited drugs, such as steroids, hormones or stimulants, to increase athletic competence.

These substances, sometimes called performance-enhancing drugs, can potentially alter the human body and biological functions. However, they can be extremely harmful to a person's health, experts warn.

The study group was also asked about four different aspects of perfectionism. The areas were: parental pressure; self-striving for perfection; concerns about making mistakes; and pressure from coaches.

Only parental pressure was linked to positive feelings about doping among the athletes, the study authors found. Although the study was small, it did point out how important demanding expectations from parents can be to kids. 

Lead author of the study, Daniel Madigan, a Ph.D. student in the university's School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, said the findings suggest that parents need to recognize the consequences of putting too much pressure on young athletes in the family.

"The problem of pressure from parents watching their children play sports is widely known, with referees and sporting bodies highlighting the difficulties and taking steps to prevent it," Madigan said in a university news release.

"With the rise of so-called 'tiger' parenting-- where strict and demanding parents push their children to high levels of achievement -- this study reveals the price young athletes may choose to pay to meet their parents' expectations and dreams," Madigan added.

The researchers only focused on young men for this study but plan to investigate if the same result will occur with young female athletes, and if there are differences between athletes in team versus individual sports.

The study findings are scheduled for publication in the April print issue of the Journal of Sports Sciences.

Story source: Robert Preidt, http://teens.webmd.com/news/20160229/young-athletes-pressured-by-parents-may-resort-to-doping

 

Daily Dose

Alcohol During Lunch with Your Baby?

1:30 to read

I know I often give advice, but I also have lots of opinions, so this may be a bit controversial but what do you think about drinking wine at lunch with your babies in tow?  I was meeting a friend for a “casual” lunch at a “healthy food” restaurant (I won't name it)  and while I was waiting I noticed a group of young mothers at the next table with their precious babies.  All of these little ones were under the age of one year.: one in a high chair while the other two were in the car seats. 

So, I also noticed that they were drinking a glass of wine while they were visiting with one another. I guess that a glass of wine is not a big deal…but I wish they had been paying a bit more attention to their babies.  I continued to watch them and when they finished the first glass of wine they ordered another while they started eating their lunch.  Again, no one was really interacting with their child.

While I am not against drinking wine at lunch, I must admit I have been guilty of this when on vacation.  But, sitting at lunch on a weekday with your tiny babies in tow and now on a second glass of wine?   By that time my friend had arrived and we started eating our lunch….but I just could not stop watching the table next to me.

The young women finished their lunches, one having another glass of wine and got up to leave.  As they were leaving the mother closest to me was buckling up her baby and we leaned over to admire him. He really had been the best baby and had sat quietly in his seat and watched all of the people around him…an easy baby. When we commented to his mother about his sweet demeanor, her comment was, “do you want him”?

I was disturbed by the entire event. How can you take your babies to lunch, for what was a seemingly normal Thursday afternoon, drink 2-3 glasses of wine and then drive your children home?

Unfortunately, when I was discussing this event with several of the young mothers in my practice they said that this was becoming more and more common. Take the kids to lunch or the park and drink while the children occupy themselves is becoming more and more “normal”.  

If you want to drink…then do it responsibly. That would not be at lunch with three young children, and then hop in the car to drive home.   Get a babysitter and take an Uber. I told you I have lots of opinions!

Parenting

Bedwetting Causes and Coping Tips

2:00

Most children will go through a bedwetting stage and though some kids get through it rather quickly, others take longer before they have consistently dry nights.

Bedwetting can also be a symptom of an underlying disease, but not typically. In fact, an underlying condition is identified in only about 1% of children who routinely wet the bed.

Bedwetting is not only difficult for the child, but it can strain a parent’s patience as well. It’s important to remember that a child that wets the bed doesn’t do it intentionally. Children who wet are not lazy, willful, or disobedient. Bedwetting is most often a developmental issue.

Did you know that there are 2 types of bedwetting? They are called primary and secondary. A child with primary bedwetting has episodes of bedwetting on a consistent basis. Secondary bedwetting is bedwetting that starts up after the child has been dry at night for a significant period of time, at least 6 months.

So, what causes primary bedwetting? It’s usually a combination of factors:

  • The child cannot yet hold urine for the entire night.
  • The child does not waken when his or her bladder is full.
  • The child produces a large amount of urine during the evening and night hours.
  • The child habitually ignores the urge to urinate and put off urinating as long as they possibly can. Parents usually are familiar with the leg crossing, face straining, squirming, squatting, and groin holding that children use to hold back urine.

Secondary bedwetting may occur because of an underlying or known medical condition or emotional problems. The child with secondary bedwetting is much more likely to have other symptoms, such as daytime wetting.  Reasons for secondary bedwetting can include:

  • Urinary tract infection: The resulting bladder irritation can cause severe pain or irritation with urination, a stronger urge to urinate, and frequent urination. Urinary tract infections in children may indicate another problem, such as an anatomical abnormality.
  • Diabetes: People with diabetes have a high level of sugar in their blood. The body increases urine output to try to get rid of the sugar. Having to urinate frequently is a common symptom of diabetes.
  • Structural or anatomical abnormality: An abnormality in the organs, muscles, or nerves involved in urination can cause incontinence or other urinary problems that could show up as bedwetting.
  • Neurological problems: Abnormalities in the nervous system, or injury or disease of the nervous system, can upset the delicate neurological balance that controls urination.
  • Emotional problems: A stressful home life, as in a home where the parents are in conflict, sometimes causes children to wet the bed. Major changes, such as starting school, a new baby, or moving to a new home, are other stresses that can also cause bedwetting. Children who are being physically or sexually abused sometimes begin bedwetting.

If your child suddenly begins to wet the bed after months or years of dry nights, talk to your child about it and your pediatrician. Your doctor may want to do an examination and bloodwork to rule out any health conditions. 

Most children do not stay dry at night until about the age of three.  And it's usually not a concern for parents until around age 6.

Bedwetting can be embarrassing for children. Be supportive and reassure your child that they won’t always wet the bed. Bedwetting often runs in families. If you want to share your own personal story, your child may see that people do outgrow it.

To help your child make it through the night dry, make sure he or she isn’t drinking a lot of liquids before bedtime. Make using the bathroom just before they get in bed part of a bedtime routine. Also remind them that it's OK to get up during the night to use the bathroom. Nightlights can help your child find his or her own way when they need to go.

Some parents wonder if they should wake their child up during the night to go. That’s a personal choice, however, keep in mind that if you deprive your child of rest and sleep, you may increase his or her level of stress. Stress can be a bedwetting trigger. Some children may also have a difficult time getting back to sleep once woken.

If your child wets the bed, you might consider getting a plastic bed cover to help protect the mattress.

If accidents do happen, try these tips to remove the smell and stains from linens, clothes and the mattress.

  • Try adding a half-cup to a cup of white vinegar to your wash to remove the smell from their sheets and clothes.
  • If you need to clean urine from a mattress, first use towels to blot up as much as you can.
  • Once you've blotted up as much of the urine as you can, saturate the entire area of urine stain with hydrogen peroxide. Let it stand for 5 minutes, and then use towels again to blot the area dry.
  • Once the mattress is dry, sprinkle baking soda over the entire area and let it stand for 24 hours. The next day, vacuum the baking soda away. It should be clean and odor free.

Bedwetting is one of those stages that kids go through that some day will just be a memory. Until then, reassure your little one that this too shall pass. Praise your child when they make it through the night without wetting the bed and let them know that if an accident happens, it’s OK – we’ll try again tonight.

Story sources: http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/guide/bedwetting-causes#2

http://www.webmd.com/parenting/ss/slideshow-bedwetting

 

Daily Dose

Who Knows Their Phone Number?

1.15 to read

Can you recite your spouse and your children’s cell phone numbers? Trying to remember 7 digits used to be easy but now I think our brains are losing the ability. I am finding more and more children who do not know their own home phone numbers (many don’t have a “home phone” to remember, there are just numerous cell phones at the house ).  One of the first things children used to memorize was their home phone number, it was a proud accomplishment for a 4-6 year old.  

Now that we have “smart phones” I think memorizing addresses and phone numbers is becoming a lost art.  Our brains are just not absorbing the numbers when all we have to do is push a name or say a command and the number is dialed.  Maybe not as smart as we think?

I guess the first question is: do you even have a home phone or do your kids call your cell phones?  Do they know your phone numbers by memory? Can they recite them to a teacher or a police officer if necessary?   I posed this question to several young parents this week, and they all kind of laughed and said, “you know I had not really thought about it”.

I see kids as young as 1-2 years using the iPad, also know as “my pad” and they use words such as “refresh”, “swipe”, “password” and “app”  so easily.  They can call their parents when they are just 12-18 months old by pushing the picture on the screen.....but do they ever know the number they are calling?  Do children still know about calling 911, or do they look for the icon of the police?

Keep teaching your children their phone numbers...they may need to call you at some time without having an “app for that”!

Daily Dose

The Perfect Baby Age

Im often asked what is my favorite baby age? I love 4-5 month olds for a number of reasons.I am in love with 4–5 month old babies!!  I have decided that that age is “the perfect baby” and I want to clone them.  I think I would call it a “Chia Baby” and market it as the baby that is the PERFECT companion and only needs to be watered!

For anyone who is reading this and has a newborn, hang in there as this happy baby will be here before you know it and for the rest of us, we know looking back, that this age baby is the one that we long to hold again. I am fortunate that I get to hug, hold and snuggle with babies every day.  I must tell you that not every age baby is my “favorite”.  But give me a 4 month old and I am in heaven. The 4-5 month old baby does all of the following things:  typically sleeps all night, or at least 6-8 hours, smiles all of the time, coos (record those sweet noises as they don’t last), laughs at everything you say, even if it is not funny, and lastly, doesn’t move when put down, doesn’t talk back, and requires only a liquid diet. I mean is this God’s perfect child or what!! I do think this age baby gets photographed the most often, as they are just so happy and cute. These precious pictures are an important photo memory too, as there were many other nights during my parenting that I looked at those precious pictures and longed for that sweet baby (especially when your teen is arguing about a curfew etc). These are the pictures that are adorning my bedside wall that make me smile right before I fall to sleep. While I cherish all of my children’s photos, the 4 month old photos of each of them hold a special place in my heart. When I see a 2 month old infant and the parents are still tired and wondering when/if their baby will sleep and get happier and on a schedule etc, I tell them just hang in there, only 2 more months and you will have the baby you dreamed of taking home from the hospital. The problem is, you have to go through the newborn stage to get to this precious age.  Why do you think all of the babies on TV are so cute, cuddly and happy? It is usually because they are 4–5 month olds “posing” as an infant.  I am sure the Gerber baby on the box is a 4 month old. I want to “check this age baby out” like a library book, and return it in a month, and get another one. Do you think I am on to something?! I am ready to start the “Chia Baby” so let me know if you want one. I am sure they will sell out quickly! What baby age is your favorite? Let me know!

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Discipline

Discipline Kids That Are Not Yours?

Your Child

Setting Up a Routine for Homework

2:00

If yours is like a lot of families, you’re just not quite ready to face the homework hurdle. But like it or not, after school assignments have arrived and helping your child get into a regular routine can actually make it easier for everyone.

Deborah Linebarger, PhD, associate professor of education at the University of Iowa, has come up with six tips to help families get back in the assignment swing of things.

Be prepared: Even if you’ve already picked up all the supplies your child needs at school, make sure the staples needed to complete assignments are also available at home. Items like pencils, erasers, folders, clips, rulers, computer paper & toner should have their own space and be ready to use if needed. This is also a good time let them set up a special place in the house where they can work undisturbed and with all the supplies they need. You may discover you have a budding interior designer with a knack for organization!

Set A Schedule: You child should do her homework at the same time every day. Many kids need a break after school for a snack and a little running around first. It's best to get homework done as early as possible -- when it drags on past dinner and toward bedtime, the work is likely to take longer and be sloppier.

Bedtime: Don’t leave homework till the last minute, make sure that it’s finished and checked at least a couple of hours before bedtime. Just like adults, children need plenty of good sleep to function well the next day. Preschoolers typically need 11-13 hours each night. Six to thirteen year olds need around 9-11 hours and teens need about 8 -10 hours a night. Make sleep a priority by having a cool, quiet and dark bedroom. Establish an appropriate bedtime for your child and stick to it. Cut off the access to computers, TVS, phones and any electronics at a minimum of an hour before it’s time for sleep. Quieting and slowing down before it’s actually time to nod off can help relax your child.

Break it down. Younger kids might get a week's worth of homework on Monday to turn in by Friday. Older children may have big responsibilities like term papers and science projects. Help them break large projects into smaller steps, and make sure they start early.

Keep up with your child’s assignments so that you’re not surprised by a last minute science project the night before it’s due!

Encourage "peer collaboration" -- to a point. It may be helpful for siblings close in age to do homework together. The older one may be proud and happy to offer help to the younger one. But if they bicker more than they cooperate, it's time for separate spaces.

What if you have a child with ADHD? As you probably already know, children with ADHD are more likely to face extra challenges with completing their homework.

He or she will need even more supervision and guidance, Linebarger says.

"Start by breaking up homework into really bite-sized amounts," she says. "For a younger child, that may be only about 10-minute increments. Expand them slowly as they show they're able to handle it." And expect that your child will need you to watch her homework efforts closely to make sure he or she stays on task.

When they gets distracted -- and they will -- encourage your boy or girl to do something physical to get back on track. "Let her jump up and run around for 5 minutes, or have him do 10 push-ups or 30 jumping jacks," Linebarger says. "Research shows that acute physical activity right before a challenging mental task helps to control behavior."

Children with ADHD often hear a lot of criticism, be sure and compliment them and encourage them when they’ve completed a difficult task.

When they manage to sit still for that 10 minutes of homework, or come home with their homework folder in order, give them lots of praise for making a great choice," Linebarger says.

It won’t be long till summer is a fond memory and the school year is just how things are. You can help your child adjust to this either new or familiar way of getting through Monday through Friday by using the tips above and finding out what adjustments may need to be made to work best for your family.

Source: Gina Shaw, http://www.webmd.com/parenting/features/back-school-homework-routine

 

Your Child

Could Health Warnings on Sodas Change Parents Buying Habits?

2:00

 In 1966, health warnings from the U.S. Surgeon General were added to cigarette packages to inform people of the dangers associated with smoking. Did it have an impact? Experts have mixed opinions.  Some say the warnings may have helped prevent some people from starting to smoke but long time smokers pretty much ignored them. Others say the warnings definitely have caused some smokers to stop while others say the warnings have not been effective at all.

What if there were health warning labels on sodas, would that make parents less likely to buy those beverages for their child? A new study says yes.

Lead researcher, Christina Roberto, and her colleagues wanted to know if health warnings- similar to cigarette warnings- would have an impact on purchasing. They conducted an online survey of nearly 2,400 parents who had at least one child aged 6 to 11 years.

 In a simulated online shopping experiment, parents were divided into six groups to "buy" drinks for their kids. One group saw no warning label on the beverages they would buy; another saw a label listing only calories. The other four groups saw various warning labels about the potential health effects of sugary beverage intake, including weight gain, obesity, type 2 diabetes and tooth decay.

 The health warning labels appeared to have the largest influence on the parents.

 Overall, only 40 percent of those who looked at the health warning labels chose a sugary drink. But, 60 percent of those who saw no label chose a sugary drink, as did  53 percent of those who saw the calorie-only label did.

 There were no significant buying differences between the groups seeing the calorie-only label and no label, the findings showed.

 "The warning labels seem to help in a way that the calorie labels do not," said Roberto, an assistant professor of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.

 The study findings make sense, said Lona Sandon, a registered dietitian and assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern  Medical Center at Dallas. "Just as we see with public health efforts to decrease smoking with warning labels, warning labels about sugary drinks will be effective with some parents but not all," she said.

 "Based on the study," she added, "it appears some will take the information to heart, but about 40 percent still chose sugary beverages in the study. That is still a big number. Nonetheless, it adds another layer of educating and influencing parents to try to make healthier choices for their children."

Currently, there are no such labels on sodas, although California is considering a policy change in sodas sold in that state.

 "Not all research is supportive of the claims made on the warning label used in this study," Sandon said. "Obesity and diabetes occur as a result of a number of factors working together -- such as physical inactivity, high-fat high-calorie food choices, genetic predisposition, etcetera -- not sugary drinks alone."

 The American Beverage Association issued a statement responding to the study: "Consumers want factual information to help make informed choices that are right for them, and America's beverage companies already provide clear calorie labels on the front of our products. A warning label that suggests beverages are a unique driver of complex conditions such as diabetes and obesity is inaccurate and misleading. Even the researchers acknowledge that people could simply buy other foods with sugar that are unlabeled."

 So, if health warnings were added to sodas and other high-sugary drinks would it make a difference in parent’s buying habits? Opinions on that will probably be the same as for cigarette health warnings; mixed and passionate.

Source: Kathleen Doheny, http://consumer.healthday.com/diabetes-information-10/sugar-health-news-644/health-warning-labels-would-help-parents-avoid-sugary-drinks-706987.html

Daily Dose

Maternity Leave & Breastfeeding

1:15 to read

When Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla, his pediatrician wife, had their baby last year he announced that he would be taking off 2 months to be at home with his wife and baby. For those fortunate enough to work for Facebook or Google or another company with a generous maternity/paternity leave policy they too may get anywhere from 2-6 months of paid leave after the birth of their baby. But for most workers, it is more the “norm” that a mother receives anywhere from 4-6 weeks of maternity leave, and in many cases it is not paid.   The first several months of being a new parent are often overwhelming, but knowing that you have 4-6 months of paid leave which allows you time to “become a family” certainly makes the adjustment to parent hood a bit easier.

Unfortunately, physicians (including pediatricians) are faced with returning to their practice often “as quickly as possible”.  I found that going back to work after 12 weeks (which I had to beg for) and trying to juggle a full load of patients, answering phone calls, taking night call and making hospital rounds really did impact my mood as well as my breastfeeding. Although I enjoyed breastfeeding,  I could not figure out how to find any time to pump between patients (talk about running late) to keep my milk supply up. So….I eventually made the decision that in order to keep working I would need to stop breast feeding, which was a bit traumatic for me…..in retrospect I was tougher on myself than I needed to be, but 30 years ago I didn’t realize the numerous other difficult parenting decisions that lay ahead.

Interestingly, a new study just published in Pediatrics is what made me ponder all of this.  Many studies have shown that mothers may have trouble continuing to breast feed after returning to work. This latest study from Australia actually found that the amount of time to return to employment was actually “far less significant than the number of hours a woman worked”.  The study found that working 19 hours or less per week was associated with a higher likelihood to continue breastfeeding.  Those women who returned to a work week of 19 hours or less “experienced no decline in the likelihood that they were breastfeeding regardless of when they returned to work and they were more likely to sustain breastfeeding as well”.  In other words longer breastfeeding, a win win for mother and child. 

As more and more women are employed during their child bearing years, the ongoing debate surrounding the appropriate length of time for maternity leave continues. While there have been many studies to show the importance of family leave after the birth of a baby ( better bonding, less post partum depression) this study is one of the first to show the benefit of a reduction of hours worked upon re-entry to the workplace.  It is my hope that this research may open the door for discussions examining the feasibility of reduced work hours for women who return to work after giving birth.  This new data may be pivotal in improving longer breastfeeding rates in the U.S.  

I am sure many women, although not included in the study,  who have juggled a career and breast feeding would agree.

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DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

If your child snores, is this a sign of something more serious?

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