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Your Child

Frito-Lay Recalls Pretzels Due to Peanut Residue

2:00

Many children, who are allergic to peanuts and other nuts, consume pretzels as a snack.

Frito-Lay announced they are voluntarily recalling certain Rold Gold Tiny Twists, Rold Gold Thins, Rold Gold Sticks and Rold Gold Honey Wheat Braided due to a potential undeclared peanut allergen.

This recall is the direct result of a recent recall by a Frito-Lay supplier of certain lots of flour for undeclared peanut residue. The Rold Gold products subject to the recall may have been produced using the recalled flour and, as a result, these Rold Gold products may contain low levels of undeclared peanut residue. More information about the flour recall can be found on the FDA’s website at: http://www.fda.gov/Food/RecallsOutbreaksEmergencies/SafetyAlertsAdvisories/ucm504002.htm.

The affected Rold Gold packages are sold in retail stores and via foodservice and vending customers throughout the United States, and have “guaranteed fresh” dates ranging from June 28, 2016 - August 23, 2016 on the front of the package. Directly underneath the “guaranteed fresh” date is a 9-digit manufacturing code that includes the numbers “32” in the second and third position (example: x32xxxxxx).

The following products with the above-described “guaranteed fresh” dates and manufacturing codes are impacted:

•       Rold Gold Tiny Twists - 1 oz. , 2 oz., 16 oz. and 20½ oz.

•       Rold Gold Thins - 4 oz. and 16 oz.

•       Rold Gold Sticks - 16 oz.

•       Rold Gold Honey Wheat Braided - 10 oz.

It is important to note that products that do not include 32 in the second and third positions of the manufacturing code are not impacted.

The Rold Gold Tiny Twists are also included in select multipack offerings. The impacted multipacks have “use by” dates on the front of the package. Directly next to or underneath the “use by” date is a 11-digit manufacturing code that will include the letter combination AM, TO, QH, QC or SW in the second and third position (example: xAMxxxxxxxx). The impacted products have different, varying “use by” dates, including:

•       20 count Baked & Popped Mix -- “use by” dates ranging from May 31 - July 26, 2016

•       20 count SunChips & Rold Gold Mix -- “use by” dates ranging from June 14 - August 9, 2016

•       32 count Fun Times Mix -- “use by” dates ranging from June 14 - August 9, 2016

•       30 count Baked & Popped Variety Pack -- “use by” dates ranging from June 14 - August 9, 2016

•       30 count Home Town Favorite Variety Pack -- “use by” dates ranging from May 31 - July 26, 2016

To date, Frito-Lay has received no reports of illness related to the products covered by this recall. No other Rold Gold products or flavors are impacted. Frito-Lay has informed the FDA of our actions.

Consumers with any product noted above can return the product to retailer for a full refund, or contact Frito-Lay Consumer Relations (9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. CST, Mon.-Fri.) at 1-888-256-3090 or www.pretzelrecall.com.

Story source: http://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm505365.htm

 

Daily Dose

Bathing Your Baby

The end of summer baby “boom” is still going on and new parents are coming in with all sorts of questions…including how do I bathe my baby?  As many mothers and their babies are being discharged from the hospital after 24 hours, they really don’t have the opportunity to “practice” new parent skills, including giving their baby a bath.

Bathing your baby is really fun and is a good bonding experience for parent and child.  The bath also keeps your baby clean and smelling “sweet”.  I was convinced that it would also help them to relax and to sleep longer (not scientific at all - but it works for us right?).  At any rate, you can bathe your baby every day or every 2-3 days, or even once a week. It is really personal preference…but that wonderful “after bath smell” makes me smile.

Many people buy infant bath tubs and there are tons to choose from. I like the the “Puj Tub” or the “Tummy Tub” as you can easily put them in the kitchen sink (grandparent friendly), but you want to make sure that there are no sharp edges or places where a baby might get bumped or injured when you put the tub in the sink.  Some people use a folding tub (be careful not to pinch the baby) or inflatable tub  these may collapse), because they are easier to store if you have limited space.

The number one rule for a bath - NEVER leave your baby alone in the tub, not even when they can start sitting up. A baby may drown in an inch or two of water…so never even turn around to check your phone or check an email.  You should also make sure that the water temperature is correct and every new parent should check the hot water heater and lower the temperature to 120 degrees F, so prevent burns. Regardless, always check the water temperature before you put the baby into the tub.

I am also a fan of using mild soaps..including Cetaphil, Cerave, Aveeno, and Aquaphor  baby wash. If your child tends to have sensitive skin it is best to avoid fragrances and harsh chemicals.  I also like to moisturize the infant after a bath with baby lotions from these same companies. New data is showing that frequent moisturizing (twice a day) may also be important in preventing allergies later in life…. so why not enjoy some baby massage…and keep watching for more information on this issue.

 

 

Parenting

What Do Kids Need to Succeed in School?

2:00

Does poverty impact a child’s ability to do well in school? Possibly says a new study, but parenting skills play a more important role.

Child development experts say that there are lots of things parents can do to help their young child grow into a successful adult. This study examines the importance of parents, especially those in the low-income bracket, having high educational expectations for their child as well as reading to them and providing computer access and training.

The path to success begins before your child heads off to kindergarten. These findings point to the importance of doing more to prepare children for kindergarten, said study co-author Dr. Neal Halfon, director of the Center for Healthier Children, Families & Communities at the University of California, Los Angeles.

"The good news is that there are some kids doing really well," he said. "And there are a lot of seemingly disadvantaged kids who achieve much beyond what might be predicted for them because they have parents who are managing to provide them what they need."

The researchers wanted to examine what it takes to help a child succeed in school. The team began by examining statistics to better understand the role of factors like poverty. "We didn't want to just look at poor kids versus rich kids, or poor versus all others," Halfon said.

Conventional thought is that "you'll do better if you get read to more, you go to preschool more, you have more regular routines and you have more-educated parents," Halfon added.

Researchers examined results of a study of 6,000 U.S. English and Spanish- speaking children who were born in 2001. The kids took math and reading tests when they entered kindergarten, and their parents answered survey questions. The investigators then adjusted the results so they wouldn't be thrown off by high or low numbers of certain types of kids.

Parental expectations played a role in how the children’s future scholastic goals were perceived. For example, only 57 percent of parents of kids who scored the worst expected their child to attend college, compared to 96 percent of parents of children who scored the highest.

The results showed that children who attended preschool scored higher on the tests than children who didn’t. Computer use at home was also more common for the higher scorers -- 84 percent compared to 27 percent. Parents also read more to the kids who scored the best, the findings showed.

Halfon noted that the parent’s own attitude about preschool had a big impact on whether their child attended or not.

Karen Smith, a pediatric psychologist with the University of Texas Medical Branch, praised the study and said it points to the importance of helping poorer parents develop parenting skills and start believing they can really support their children.

"Parents from more affluent families know what to do when it comes to reading to their kids, probably because they've been read to," Smith said. Poorer parents "may not even have the money for books, and maybe they weren't read to themselves."

The study points out that preschool attendance is crucial for helping children develop better learning skills, however, it’s not the only factor that plays an important role.

Smith and Halfon agreed that it's crucial to teach poorer parents how to be better at parenting. Still, Halfon said, "there's no single one magic bullet that's going to solve the problem," not even widening access to preschool. "That's necessary," he said, "but it's probably not sufficient."

Parents that make their child’s education an important part of their childrearing help their children succeed most. Reading to children is a key part of developing a child’s attitude towards studying and expression.  A child that is excited to learn new words and is able to understand the flow of a story learns how to express their own ideas better with less frustration. New challenges aren’t as daunting.

Computer use is essential in this day and age. Libraries can provide access to computers for families that cannot afford to buy one. It takes time and commitment and when money is scarce it’s often twice as difficult, but it can make an enormous difference in a child’s ability to keep up with changing technology as well opening up a new world of opportunities.

Children rely solely on their parent’s guidance and this study points out how much that guidance can change the course of their little one’s lives.

The study is online and comes out in print in the February issue of the journal Pediatrics.

Source: Randy Dotinga, http://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/child-development-news-124/family-income-expectations-key-to-kindergarten-performance-695515.html

 

Daily Dose

Sick Child? Have Patience

1:30 to read

I just got off the phone from texting with the mother of a 3 year old patient of mine. It was late in the afternoon and her son had just started crying that his mouth hurt.  I was texting her from the back of a car en route to the airport..the wonders of technology!

She was concerned because the pain had come on so abruptly, but she text me that he did not have a fever, had not had a fall or trauma to hurt his mouth, and that when he opened his mouth she could not see anything that would cause “obvious pain”.  

I asked her a few more questions via text and recommended that she might try giving him a dose of ibuprofen and see if he calmed down and felt better, but I did not hear back from her for awhile.

It was then that I realized that pediatrics and parenting have quite a bit in common…one of the similarities being patience.  

While she was concerned that her child had suddenly started crying due to some sort of pain, much of pediatrics is about watching and waiting.  We parents all want to keep our children pain free, but sometimes things will hurt both physically, and as your child gets older, emotionally (which may be even worse to watch).  A parents first instinct is to find the cause of the pain and “fix it”.  Whether that means a band aid, a kiss on a boo-boo, or medicine.. “just make it better”.

But in many cases in pediatrics and actually all of medicine, it is about watching, following, and waiting, which is not as easy as it may sound. Doctors, parents and patients often have to “be patient” and see what evolves.  Not all tummy aches are cases of appendicitis, not all falls cause a concussion and not all boo-boos result in broken bones (thank goodness!).

But for a parent to hear “let’s see what happens in an hour or so” may sound like a lifetime and waiting just seems crazy when there is a “doc in the box” on every corner.  You may see where I am going with this.

So, by the time I heard back from this concerned mother, she was already at the nearby “doc in the box” waiting for a doctor to see her son, who by now had stopped crying.  She had already put him in the carseat for the drive to the clinic before she read my text, so he had not even had any ibuprofen.

According to the clinic doctor (or nurse), the child “had an ear infection causing his pain” and she was given a prescription for antibiotics.  Once the mother was home and I could talk to her I asked if they had prescribed medication for pain relief, such as ear drops and/or ibuprofen. She said she only had the antibiotic prescription which she had filled, but her child had stopped complaining of pain.

So, I was not there, and did not see her child, but I wonder if ibuprofen might have done the trick and alleviated his pain..and also kept him off of an antibiotic until he could be seen the following day in the office?

But in this age of “quick” medicine and a clinic on every corner,  a patient/parent may not need to wait and see what evolves. I wonder if this “quick” medicine may be one reason we see antibiotic overuse . I’m just saying….  

Daily Dose

Being a Dad

1:30 to read

Seeing that this is the week of Father’s Day (have you made your card or shopped yet?), I thought this was a good time to discuss some recent data that might be of interest to men….especially those who may be planning a family in the near future. 

For years research has shown that maternal age may contribute to birth defects and chromosomal abnormalities, including Down’s syndrome.. It has also been known that a pregnant woman’s health and habits may also affect their unborn baby’s health, therefore  woman are instructed to stop smoking and drinking alcohol while trying to get pregnant as well as throughout their pregnancy.

Dr. Joanna Kitlinska a researcher from Georgetown University has been studying how men’s age as well as their habits might also impact a child.  Her findings have shown a link between men who are over 40 years- “advanced paternal age”  and the incidence of autism as compared to fathers under 30 years of age.  Studies have also found that older fathers are more  likely to have children who develop schizophrenia.  Researchers wonder if this link may be due to changes in a father’s genes as they age….but to date this is unclear. “Biological clocks” and a woman’s decision to delay a pregnancy until their career is established (or for a myriad of reasons) may now be a decision that men will face as well.  Could both aging eggs and sperm play a role in genetic abnormalities? 

Smoking seems to be another habit that may somehow affect a man’s sperm and could potentially lead to genetic abnormalities in a child. 

While fetal alcohol spectrum disorders are known to be found in women who have consumed alcohol throughout their pregnancy,  researchers have also noted that 3 out of 4 children diagnosed with FAS also have alcoholic fathers.   Could their father’s excessive use of alcohol have also played a role in their developing brain?  This association has been found even if the mother did not drink alcohol during her pregnancy. Again, did the alcohol affect a father’s sperm and genes which was passed on to their child?

So…bottom line, it is important that “fathers to be” are equally invested in a healthy lifestyle when they are planning on having children.  It goes without saying that smoking, drinking, and even obesity and stress are not good choices for anyone …..but the fact that these choices may affect a future child are good reasons for both fathers, and mothers to be aware of this research when they are planning a family. 

 

Daily Dose

Waiting for the Doctor

1:30 to read

I just read a really good article from The Huffington Post that was written by a young woman from the UK.  She was discussing the issue of waiting for a doctor. She herself had been waiting for her doctor when she noticed another patient who was being very loud and quite verbal about waiting. He engaged her in conversation and said, “I bet that doctor is back there having a cup of tea”. He must have been stunned when she replied, “well, I certainly hope so”.  She knew that the doctors had recently seen her as an emergency when she began bleeding during her pregnancy. She knew that they had dropped everything to attend to her and her unborn baby and for that she was eternally grateful.  

I also “hate to wait” when I am seeing my own doctor, but I do know that he or she is not “back there eating bon-bons".  I also know that many patients have waited for me, sometimes for up to an hour.  I promise you that I know that I am running late and it makes me very anxious. But at the same time, I am doing the best that I can to treat each and every patient as if they were my own child or family member.  Sometimes a patient comes in with a more complicated or urgent problem and the time taken with that patient is much longer than was expected. Or, a child arrives wheezing and in respiratory distress without even having an appointment….they to will be “worked on” in front of everyone else…as they need a doctor immediately. 

The article continued to re-count how many times during her pregnancy that she had needed to be seen as she continued to have issues with bleeding, and each and every time, the doctors were there, no wait and no questions….they just did their job.

It is difficult to explain why doctors run late and I understand how patients are frustrated when they wait. But at the same time, how do you schedule the appropriate amount of time for a patient who calls for an appointment because their child is sick with a fever and a sore throat. But, while you are seeing their child they break down in your exam room and tell you that they have found out that their husband is “cheating on them” and that “he wants a divorce”.  As their pediatrician, do you tell them that you don’t “have the time” to listen to their problems. Do you just deal with their child’s sore throat and ignore the mother’s anguish. In my case, I choose to spend time with the mother, to empathize with her, and hope to help her.  I know that this reaction will make me late….but it is what I need and want to do for my patients and families.

Whenever I am talking to prospective patients I am perfectly honest when they ask me, “will I ever have to wait?”.  My response has changed over the years as I have come to realize that there will be times when they do wait….but it is not because I ever want to “run late” or make my patients wait. It is because, I have decided that my practice has just as many flaws as my parenting, not perfect. But similar to my children, at times one will need me more than another, and when they do I will spend more time with the one that needs me the most.  It may not seem “fair”, but how do you make it always be “fair”?  I hope that at the end of the 23-25 years I spend with these families they come to realize…it all evens out in the end…there are times that I spent too much time with them and then there are times that they waited.  But, just like parenting, you do the best that you can.  I will continue to practice that way as well. I promise, if you are waiting I am not having tea and bon-bons!!!   

Your Child

Pre-teen Football Linked to Brain Changes in NFL Players

2:00

The start of a new school year also brings after-school sports programs. Late summer and fall is prime football season for many middle and high schools. In some states, it’s a hallowed tradition that boys and girls look forward to participating in whether it’s running down the field or cheering on the team.

While school football doesn’t typically offer the same ferocious body beating and brain –rattling that are seen in the National Football League (NFL), a new study shows that brain development can still be affected by playing football at a young age.

The study looked at the possible connection between a greater risk of altered brain development in NFL players who started playing football before the age of twelve as opposed to those players who began playing later in life.  The study is the first to show a link between early repetitive head trauma and future structural brain variations.

The study was small but interesting. It included a review of 40 former NFL players between the ages of 40 and 65 who played over 12 years of structured football with a minimum of 2 years at the NFL level.

One half of the players took up football prior to the age of 12 and half started at age 12 or later. The number of concussions suffered was very similar between the two groups. All of these players had a minimum of six months of memory and cognitive issues.

"To examine brain development in these players, we used an advanced technique called diffusor tensor imaging (DTI), a type of magnetic resonance imaging that specifically looks at the movement of water molecules along white matter tracts, which are the super-highways within the brain for relaying commands and information," study author Dr. Inga Koerte, professor of neurobiological research at the University of Munich and visiting professor at Harvard University, said in a press release.

The researches believe their findings add to the growing amount of scientific evidence that shows the brain may be especially vulnerable to injury between the ages of 10 and 12.

"Therefore, this development process may be disrupted by repeated head impacts in childhood possibly leading to lasting changes in brain structure," said study author Julie Stamm, currently a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.

Despite finding a link to the brain development window where kids are more likely to suffer brain injury by repeated head impacts, the small size of the study means the results may not necessarily apply to non-professionals.

"The results of this study do not confirm a cause and effect relationship, only that there is an association between younger age of first exposure to tackle football and abnormal brain imaging patterns later in life," said study author Martha Shenton, a professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

Because of the intense publicity about and the findings of many studies on the short and long-term dangers of concussions, many school sports programs are looking at changing how they allow students to play in games associated with head injuries.  Where it was once common for coaches to let players continue playing after a particularly rough tackle or head butting, they are more likely now to insist that a field medical professional examine the child. Some schools are also implementing no tackle policies to protect very young players.

While traditional football isn’t likely to become extinct, parents and coaches can educate themselves about brain injuries and learn how to best protect young players from the chances of long and short-term disabilities.

Source: Brett Smith,  http://www.redorbit.com/news/health/1113407634/pre-teen-football-linked-to-more-severe-brain-changes-in-nfl-players-081115/

 

 

Your Child

Could Health Warnings on Sodas Change Parents Buying Habits?

2:00

 In 1966, health warnings from the U.S. Surgeon General were added to cigarette packages to inform people of the dangers associated with smoking. Did it have an impact? Experts have mixed opinions.  Some say the warnings may have helped prevent some people from starting to smoke but long time smokers pretty much ignored them. Others say the warnings definitely have caused some smokers to stop while others say the warnings have not been effective at all.

What if there were health warning labels on sodas, would that make parents less likely to buy those beverages for their child? A new study says yes.

Lead researcher, Christina Roberto, and her colleagues wanted to know if health warnings- similar to cigarette warnings- would have an impact on purchasing. They conducted an online survey of nearly 2,400 parents who had at least one child aged 6 to 11 years.

 In a simulated online shopping experiment, parents were divided into six groups to "buy" drinks for their kids. One group saw no warning label on the beverages they would buy; another saw a label listing only calories. The other four groups saw various warning labels about the potential health effects of sugary beverage intake, including weight gain, obesity, type 2 diabetes and tooth decay.

 The health warning labels appeared to have the largest influence on the parents.

 Overall, only 40 percent of those who looked at the health warning labels chose a sugary drink. But, 60 percent of those who saw no label chose a sugary drink, as did  53 percent of those who saw the calorie-only label did.

 There were no significant buying differences between the groups seeing the calorie-only label and no label, the findings showed.

 "The warning labels seem to help in a way that the calorie labels do not," said Roberto, an assistant professor of medical ethics and health policy at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine.

 The study findings make sense, said Lona Sandon, a registered dietitian and assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern  Medical Center at Dallas. "Just as we see with public health efforts to decrease smoking with warning labels, warning labels about sugary drinks will be effective with some parents but not all," she said.

 "Based on the study," she added, "it appears some will take the information to heart, but about 40 percent still chose sugary beverages in the study. That is still a big number. Nonetheless, it adds another layer of educating and influencing parents to try to make healthier choices for their children."

Currently, there are no such labels on sodas, although California is considering a policy change in sodas sold in that state.

 "Not all research is supportive of the claims made on the warning label used in this study," Sandon said. "Obesity and diabetes occur as a result of a number of factors working together -- such as physical inactivity, high-fat high-calorie food choices, genetic predisposition, etcetera -- not sugary drinks alone."

 The American Beverage Association issued a statement responding to the study: "Consumers want factual information to help make informed choices that are right for them, and America's beverage companies already provide clear calorie labels on the front of our products. A warning label that suggests beverages are a unique driver of complex conditions such as diabetes and obesity is inaccurate and misleading. Even the researchers acknowledge that people could simply buy other foods with sugar that are unlabeled."

 So, if health warnings were added to sodas and other high-sugary drinks would it make a difference in parent’s buying habits? Opinions on that will probably be the same as for cigarette health warnings; mixed and passionate.

Source: Kathleen Doheny, http://consumer.healthday.com/diabetes-information-10/sugar-health-news-644/health-warning-labels-would-help-parents-avoid-sugary-drinks-706987.html

Daily Dose

New Year New You

1:30 to read

With the New Year upon us what better time to talk about changing some habits.  Why is it that habits are certainly easy to acquire, but difficult to change?  I just saw a book on The New York Times Bestseller list about “Habits” and I am committed to reading it this year.  

I know that we started many “bad” habits when my husband and I were new parents, and I talk to my patients every day about not doing the same things I did.....but, even with that knowledge there are several recurrent habits that I wish parents would try to change....or better yet, don’t start.

Here you go!

#1  Do not have your baby/child sleep with you  (unless they are sick).  This is a recurrent theme in my practice and the conversation typically starts when a parent complains that “I am not getting enough sleep, my child wakes me up all night long”.  Whether that means getting in the habit of breast feeding your child all night long, or having your two year old “refuse” to go to sleep without you...children need to be independent sleepers. Some children are born to be good sleepers while others require “learning” to sleep, but either way your child needs to know how to sleep alone. I promise you...their college roommate will one day thank you.

#2  Poor eating habits.  Family meals are a must and healthy eating starts with parents (do you see a recurrent theme?). I still have parents, with 2, 3 or 4 children who are “short order cooks” which means they make a different meal for everyone.  Who even has the time?  Sounds exhausting!!  Even cooking 2 meals (breakfast, dinner) a day for a family is hard to do for 20 years, but enabling your children to have poor eating habits by only serving “their 4 favorite foods- is setting them up for a lifetime of picky and typically unhealthy eating.  Start serving one nutritious family dinner and let everyone have one night a week to help select the meal. Beyond that, everyone eats the same thing.  Easy!  If they are hungry they will eat.

#3  No electronics in your child’s room. If you start this habit from the beginning it will be easy....if you have a TV in your child’s room when they are 6-8, good luck taking it out when they are 13-15.  First TV in their room should be in a college dorm.  For older children make sure that you are docking their electronics outside of their rooms for the night. Everyone will sleep better!

These may sound easy....so give it a try.  

Happy New Year!

 

 

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DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

Just how much sleep does your child need?

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