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Parenting

Recall: More Than 500,000 Diono Children’s Car Seats

1:45

Diono has announced that it is recalling more than 500,000 car seats after concerns that they may not adequately protect children in a crash. The recall covers the following models: Radian R100, Radian R120, Radian RXT, Olympia, Pacifica and Rainier convertible and booster seats. The car seats were made from as early as January 2014 to September 2017 by Diono, which used to be called Sunshine Kids Juvenile.

The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says that when the seats are secured using a lap belt without the top tether, children over 65 pounds have an increased risk of chest injury in a crash.

Diono, based in Sumner, Washington, says it has no reports of injuries and that few children who weigh more than 65 pounds will be harnessed into the seats. The problem was discovered in company testing. The company will send owners a kit with an energy absorbing pad and a new chest clip at no cost. The recall is expected to start November 22. Customers with questions can call Diono at (855) 463-4666.

Consumers can also click on https://us.diono.com/safety-notice/ for more information.

To ensure that your child is using the car seat safest for them Rachel Rothman, Chief Technologist in the Good Housekeeping Institute, recommends taking the following precautions:

  • Buy a car seat that is age and size appropriate. Resist the urge to deviate from this so you can better see your child or for other reasons.
  • Make sure that when installing a car seat the latch straps or seatbelt straps are not twisted.
  • A properly installed car seat should not move more than one inch from side to side and front to back.
  • Read the car seat instruction manual as well as the vehicle owner manual for proper installation instructions.
  • Check the return policy on your car seat before you make a purchase in case you buy the wrong size and need to replace it.
  • Delay switching to front-facing car seats as late as possible to ensure safety. Before you make the switch, make sure your child truly has outgrown their current seat.

Story source: http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/travel-products/car-seat-reviews/news/a46498/diono-car-seat-recall/

https://us.diono.com/safety-notice/

Your Child

ATV Accidents Causing Serious Chest Injuries in Kids

1:45

From rural America to the suburbs, you can count on the sound of children and their new ATV buzzing up and down the street on Christmas morning. All-terrain vehicles are a popular gift during the holidays, and more often than not, you’ll see children with a safety helmet on to reduce the risk of head trauma – should they have an accident.

What parents may not know is that these vehicles also pose a high risk for severe chest injuries, according to a new study.

"I believe that many parents are unaware of how serious ATV-related injuries can be," said the study's author, Dr. Kelly Hagedorn, a radiology resident at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston.

"Some parents view ATVs as being more similar to bicycles. However, many of the injury patterns are more similar to those sustained in motor vehicle collisions," Hagedorn explained.

ATVs are motorized recreational vehicles with three or four tires, designed for off-road use. Because they can weigh 300 to 400 pounds and travel at speeds of up to 75 miles an hour, ATVs can often be involved in serious accidents, including crashes, rollovers and ejections, the researchers said.

The good news is that ATV-related injuries have declined since 2007. As public safety awareness about ATVs increases, more parents are making sure that helmets, protective clothing and personal oversight safeguard their children.

However, nearly 25,000 children under the age of 16 were treated for ATV-related injuries in hospital emergency rooms nationwide in 2014, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

Researchers suspect that one of the reasons children’s ATV-related chest injuries are becoming more severe and frequent is that the newer vehicles are larger and weigh more than their predecessors. 

"As ATVs have gotten bigger and heavier, riders have a harder time separating from the vehicle in a crash," said Gerene Denning. She's director of emergency medicine research at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine.

"The increasing size and weight of ATVs leads to more cases of the vehicle striking the rider. There is also a growing trend of riders being pinned by the vehicle, which can lead to compression asphyxia [a condition where the body doesn't get enough oxygen]," said Denning, who wasn't involved in this study.

The new study included records from 455 patients, 18 years old and younger. All had chest imaging at a trauma center in Houston after ATV-related incidents. The accidents occurred between 1992 and 2013. Of those admitted, 102 (22%) suffered a chest injury.

The researchers said that 40% of patients with chest injuries were treated in an intensive care unit (ICU), compared to 22% of patients without chest injuries. On average, patients with chest injuries were 13 years old.

The most common chest injury (61%) was pulmonary contusion, or bruising of the lung. About 45% of patients had a collapsed lung and 34% had rib fractures. Eight deaths occurred among the 102 patients who had chest trauma, the study found.

The study authors found that the biggest cause of chest injury was rollover (43%), followed by collision with landscape (2 %) and falls (16%).

In 41 cases, the injured child had been driving the ATV. In 33 cases, he or she had been riding along as a passenger. In the remaining 28 cases, it wasn't known whether the injured child was the driver or passenger.

While many parents are being more vigilant about ATV safety, some still believe bigger is better and are still allowing their children to operate adult-size vehicles.

"This increases both the risk of crashing and the severity of vehicle-related trauma," Denning said. "A group called Concerned Families for ATV Safety have story after story of children killed in ATV crashes. A common thread through those stories is a parent saying they didn't know how dangerous these vehicles were for their children."

ATV laws are not consistent nationwide. In many states, children younger than 16 can drive ATVs designed for adults, according to the CPSC. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that children under that age be prohibited from riding ATVs.

Hagedorn is scheduled to present the study results at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, in Chicago. Findings presented at meetings are generally viewed as preliminary until they've been published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Concerned Families for ATV Safety, mentioned above, offers educational resources, news and ATV safety tips for parents. It also shares family stories of children injured or killed in an ATV accident. Their website is: http://www.cfatvsafety.org

Story source: Don Rauf, https://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/child-safety-news-587/atv-accidents-can-cause-serious-chest-injuries-in-children-717207.html

Your Child

Trampoline Safety Tips

2:00

Trampolines are a lot of fun and great exercise, but they also come with risks for injuries.  All the hopping, bouncing and tumbling can sometimes lead to accidents, particularly if more than one child is on the trampoline. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has released a list of safety precautions parents should take if there is a trampoline at the house.

The AAOS and the AAP both say that children 6 years and younger should not be allowed on trampolines.

"Children younger than age 6 are less likely to have the coordination, body awareness and swift reaction time necessary to keep their bodies, bones and brains safe on trampolines," said Dr. Jennifer Weiss, a Los Angeles pediatric orthopedic surgeon and academy spokesperson.

The most common injuries children suffer on trampolines are sprains and fractures caused by falls on the trampoline mat, frame or springs. Collisions with other jumpers; stunts gone wrong; and falls off the trampoline onto the ground or other hard surfaces, are also injuries physicians see.

Landing wrong can cause serious or permanent injuries even when the trampoline has a net and padding. The majority of injuries occur when there is more than one person on the trampoline.

The AAP doesn’t recommend that parents buy a home trampoline, but if you decide to have one, they offer these safety guidelines:

  • Adult supervision at all times
  • Only one jumper on the trampoline at a time
  • No somersaults performed 
  • Adequate protective padding on the trampoline that is in good condition and appropriately placed
  • Check all equipment often 
  • When damaged, protective padding, the net enclosure, and any other parts should be repaired or replaced

The AAOS adds these safety precautions:

  • Place the trampoline-jumping surface at ground level. Remove trampoline ladders after use to prevent unsupervised use by young children.
  • Regularly inspect equipment and throw away worn or damaged equipment if you can't get replacement parts.
  • Don't rely on safety net enclosures for injury prevention because most injuries occur on the trampoline surface. Check that supporting bars, strings and surrounding landing surfaces have adequate protective padding that's in good condition.
  • Close adult supervision, proper safety measures and instruction are crucial when a trampoline is used for physical education, competitive gymnastics, diving training and similar activities.
  • Have spotters present when participants are jumping. Do not allow somersaults or high-risk maneuvers unless there is proper supervision, instruction and protective equipment such as a harness.

Another tip that the AAP offers trampoline owners is to check their homeowner’s insurance policy to obtain a rider to cover trampoline-related injuries if not included in the basic policy.

Story sources: Robert Preidt, https://consumer.healthday.com/fitness-information-14/trampolining-health-news-285/surgeons-warn-of-trampolines-down-side-724795.html

https://healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-play/Pages/Trampolines-What-You-Need-to-Know.aspx

 

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