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Concussions

Concussions & Young Athletes

Daily Dose

Dog Bites

1:30 to read

I am a dog lover and we have always had a dog in our house….even before we had our children.  But, some dogs will bite and unfortunately there are more than 800,000 people every year who receive medical care for a dog bite…more than half of these are children.

 

Children are also more likely to be severely injured from a dog bite…and I was reminded of this today when I saw a very serious dog bite to a child’s face.  The child was brought to my office by his nanny after being bitten on his cheek by the family’s dog.  It was one of the worst bites I have ever seen! He was severely injured and should have actually gone straight to the ER….the good news is that he will ok, but he had to undergo surgery to repair the bite and will probably require another small surgery at some later date. 

 

In this case as in most, the dog bite occurs when a child is interacting with a familiar dog, and in this case it was the family pet. The little boy is a toddler with a twin sister and they were playing when he was bitten.  The dog had been around the children since they were born…and it is unclear what precipitated the bite.  Sometimes a dog becomes aggressive if they are bothered while they are eating or sleeping…and you know toddlers, they can “bother” anyone. 

 

One of my “boys” is also a dog bite statistic.  He was raised with dogs (my sweet lab Maggie is at my feet as I am writing), so I was totally caught off guard one night when the phone rang. My son had been spending the night at a friend’s house (he was about 10 years old) and the voice on the other end of the phone was the father of the friend (he too a doctor), informing me that my child had been bitten by their dog.  It seemed the boys were laying on the floor on blankets watching a movie and eating popcorn and for some “unknown “ reason the dog bit my son on his face.  The bite was not precipitated by anything…they had not been playing or rough housing with the dog and the dog had not been known to be aggressive. The next words out of the father’s mouth…”do you know a good plastic surgeon?” Not words you want to hear from another physician.

 

Thankfully, I did know a good plastic surgeon who I awakened after his long day in the OR….and he got out of bed and met us to suture my son’s face with over 20 stitches. Luckily it only involved his nose, cheek and chin, just barely missing his left eye. I am sure I cried more than my son.  He still has a scar across his nose..which only bothers his mother.  Incredibly, he never “blamed” their dog, went back to play at their house, and still loves his own dogs more than anything.  My brother who is a vet still thinks that any dog that bites without provocation should not stay in the home with children…but that is one vet’s opinion. 

 

It is especially important to teach your children never to approach a dog to pet it without first asking the owner if it is okay.  Children should learn to move slowly and let the dog “sniff” them first and to stay away from their face and tail. Teach your child how to gently pet an animal and to always be gentle.  If they are around a dog who is behaving in a threatening manner by growling or barking, they should slowly back away from the dog and try to avoid eye contact with the dog. If they are ever knocked over by a dog they should curl up in and ball and protect their face with their arms.

If your child is bitten and it is superficial it will probably just require care with soap and water. For bites that break the skin you should check in with your pediatrician.  Make sure you know the rabies vaccination status of the dog that bit.  You also need to make sure that your child is up to date on their tetanus vaccination. In some cases your child may also need an antibiotic.

Daily Dose

Hot Car Deaths

1:30 to read

Did you know that heat stroke is the second leading cause of non-traffic fatalities among children, with the first being backover deaths.  As the summer temperatures are rising these tragic accidents become all too frequent.  

My home state of Texas leads the country in child vehicular heat stroke deaths, followed by Florida and California.  But children who are trapped in vehicles have died in milder climates as well. The temperatures outside may be as low as 60 degrees, but the inside of a car heats up quickly, with 80% of the increase in temperature happening in the first 10 minutes. The reason for this is due to physics.....the sun’s short-wave radiation is absorbed by dark dashboards and seats...the heated objects including child seats then emit long wave radiation which heats a vehicle’s interior air.  All of this leads to tragedy.

A child’s thermoregulatory system is not the same as an adult’s, and their body temperatures will warm 3-5 times faster.  When a child’s body temperature rises to about 107 degrees or greater, their internal organs begin to shut down.This scenario can then lead to death. If you see a child who has been left in a hot car call 911...every minute matters.

The greatest percentage of these tragic deaths are totally unintentional.  These parents are not “bad parents” or “child abusers”, they are loving, good parents who simply forgot that their child was in the car. On average there have been around 37 deaths per year due to vehicular heat stroke and in most cases this is not due to reckless behavior but simply to forgetfulness.  Parents and caregivers both admit to “just forgetting” a child was in the car.  It truly can happen to anyone.

So, how can you remember that your precious, quiet, sleeping child is in back seat. Make it a routine to always look in the back seat before you lock and leave the car.  Try putting your purse, briefcase, or cell phone in the back seat as a reminder to look for your child.

Lastly, if your child is in childcare, have a plan that the childcare provider will call you if you have not notified them that your child will not be coming to school,  and they don’t show up.

Your Child

Kids Who Specialize In One Sport Have More Injuries

Kids who came to the clinic with injuries played organized sports an average of 11 hours a week, compared with fewer than nine hours in the uninjured group. Although the researchers did not specifically look at this, Jayanthi said he has noticed that more highly specialized sports such as tennis, gymnastics and dance tend to be linked to more severe overuse injuries.Because a child’s body is still growing, children who specialize in only one sport suffer repetitive injuries more often, a new study says.

In fact, kids are twice as likely to get hurt –playing just one sport- as those who play multiple sports said Dr. Neeru Jayanthi, medical director of primary care sports medicine at Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. "We saw a pretty significant difference with this intensity of training, along with specialization," said Jayanthi. The findings are slated to be presented Monday at the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine annual meeting in Salt Lake City. Research presented at medical meetings should be viewed as preliminary. "It's been accepted for the last five years or so that kids who are not super-specific do better. They're cross-trained, so they're conditioned for other movements," said Dr. Kory Gill, an assistant professor at Texas A&;M Health Science Center College of Medicine. Jayanith’s research team had done earlier studies on 519 junior tennis players and found that the kids who only played tennis were more likely to get hurt. Jayanthi wanted to see if the same findings extended to other sports. "As a physician, you get frustrated seeing kids come in with injuries that keep them out for two to three months. It's devastating," said Jayanthi, who recently saw a young gymnast with a knee injury that will keep her off the mat for at least three months. Here, the researchers looked at 154 young athletes, average age 13, who played a variety of sports. Eighty-five of the participants came to the clinic for treatment for a sports injury, while 69 were just getting sports physicals. The investigation ranked each athlete on how specialized they were, basing the score on factors like how often they trained in one sport, whether they had given up other sports to practice just one, and if they trained 8 months a year or more to compete more than 6 months a year on one sport. What they discovered was that 60.4 percent of the athletes who had been injured were specialized in one sport, compared with only 31.3 percent who came in for physicals. Kids who came to the clinic with injuries played organized sports an average of 11 hours a week, compared with fewer than nine hours in the uninjured group. Although the researchers did not specifically look at this, Jayanthi said he has noticed that more highly specialized sports such as tennis, gymnastics and dance tend to be linked to more severe overuse injuries. Why did these injuries occur? "One reason is repetitive use of the same muscle group and stressors to growing areas, for example, the spine," explained Jayanthi, who stressed that the findings were preliminary. His team, in collaboration with Children's Memorial Hospital in Chicago, plans to enroll more athletes in follow-up research, and those athletes will be evaluated every six months for three years, to look more closely at how intense training can affect a young athlete's body during growth spurts. "Second is exposure risk," he added. "If you're getting really good at one sport, the intensity increases because you are getting better. People are developing adult-type sports skills in a child's body. The growing body probably doesn't tolerate this." Younger children -- those who have not entered high school -- tend to be especially vulnerable as their bodies are still growing, said Gill, who recommended that kids cross-train and condition for other movements, or just play another sport. "I tell parents to let kids be kids and play multiple sports," he said. "See what they're good at and what they enjoy." By high school, when bodies are more mature, specializing is safer, he added. When children play different sports in different seasons, they are using a wide range of motions and muscles. But when they begin playing one sport year-round, the risk of overuse injuries increases.

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Daily Dose

Parents Need To Take Concussions Seriously

Dr. Sue explains why parents need to take concussion seriously. They are a brain injury.I have blogged previously about the latest recommendations concerning concussions and restrictions on activity after sustaining a  concussion. This subject has been in the news a great deal lately, not only within the medical community, but also within the NFL and other major sports groups.

There is more and more data to show that concussions in and of themselves are dangerous, but that repetitive concussions may cause even greater damage to the brain, especially to the still developing brain of young athletes. I just saw an eleven year old boy who is a soccer play, actually, he is the goalie. He was at school, just playing around in the gym, when he sustained a concussion after running into another child head on and falling backwards.  The boy remembered falling, but shortly thereafter he became disoriented, could not take a test due to the fact that his memory was impaired, and subsequently vomited. His concerned parents brought him to my office to be evaluated.  By the time I saw him he was feeling better, and he had a normal neurological exam. Based upon the history of his injury he was diagnosed with a concussion.  Because of this he and his parents were advised that he not participate in sports for a minimum of a week.  Of course, as it would turn out,  his school soccer team was supposed to be in the State championship game in 48 hours.  Their team was 92 -0.  After much discussion and a conversation with his coach the parents we all agreed that he would not play. The following day, I received an email from his father who felt that his son was doing well and was “back to normal”.   He had been re-thinking the issue of his son not playing and wanted me to reconsider my instructions for his son not to play. He even noted that he himself had played college soccer and had often played after suffering a concussion.  He felt that if his son played (if he was absolutely needed to secure a win) and did not do “headers” that he would be okay. What was he thinking?  I don’t really think he was thinking about anything other than his son’s team winning a State championship. He seemed to have tunnel vision, and could not see that there would be many more soccer games in his son’s future, but another concussion could cause long term problems for his son.  So, I stood by my recommendation, for which his mother “thanked me”.  His team played the game and of course they lost. I felt terribly for their loss, but at the same time, knew that medically this was the appropriate decision. So many times, we as parents get so “wrapped up” in our children’s lives, whether it be in sports, academics or even having the “best” birthday party, that we lose sight of the “big picture”.  I see the” big picture” as trying to make the best decisions for our children, given the best information that we have to help make that decision. Many of those decisions may not be easy, but we as parents know they are right.  Whether that is keeping your child from playing a soccer game after suffering a concussion, or taking away a teen’s cell phone and computer privileges after they have been drinking under age.  There are so many of these difficult decisions and we all hope to make them correctly. This patients family did, and I am proud of them! That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow! Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

Common Thumb Injury

1.00 to read

Have you ever slammed your finger in the door or has your child hit their thumb with the head of a hammer?  If this has happened to anyone in your family you may recognize the bruised and bloodied nail bed, which is called a subungual hematoma.  Essentially this is a collection of blood, like a bruise, beneath the nail. 

This kind of trauma, albeit not life threatening, can cause a lot of pain and discomfort. Because the blood has no where to go due to the overlying protective coating of the nail, the injured finger or thumb just pounds and throbs as the blood pools under the nail.  

If the hematoma is fairly small and the injury minor, the nail just looks dark and the pain goes away fairly quickly and the nail may not even fall off. But with a bigger crush injury and more damage, the hematoma involves the entire nail bed and it is pretty painful and won’t stop pounding.  

The treatment is really fairly simple and I can remember keeping a large paper clip at home for just this reason. With my own children and friends and neighbors, I often was the “hero” Mom for a second or two as I would clean the injured finger and then heat the tip of the paper clip and just “magically” poke a hole through the fingernail to let the oozing blood out!!! Voila, no more pressure or pounding and really no pain with the procedure. Kids loved to watch his trick! 

Modern medicine has advanced and we have now moved to an electric cautery in the office. It does the exact same thing, puts a hole in the nail and relieves the pressure of the blood beneath the nail. It is just a little “slicker” than that handy dandy paper clip. 

So.....here you go, my last patient was happy to oblige with this picture of the procedure and I promise you there were no tears. Maybe a few tears of joy when the nail quit throbbing! 

 

 

 

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Daily Dose

Summer Means Head Lacerations

Parents are often frantic (as we all can be) when their child falls and you see blood coming from the head and face.Last weekend I had several phone calls about head lacerations. Summer is the season for accidents and it seems the weekends are always the busiest.

Parents are often frantic (as we all can be) when their child falls and you see blood coming from the head and face. Luckily, in most cases there is more blood than one would expect for the size of the injury, as the head is well vascularized and therefore even a small laceration will cause a lot of bleeding. The first thing to do is to get the child calmed down (and you too) and try and wash the area to really get an idea as to how large the laceration is. The patient who called could not get her child to let her look at her head (which showed that her child was okay if she could put up that much of a fight) so we had the idea of taking her toddler to the shower with the mother and to wash off there. That worked wonderfully and by then both mother and child had calmed down. Once you can see the cut, try to establish how deep and wide it is, and then see if you can stop the bleeding with pressure to the cut. If it is a scalp wound and you can stop the bleeding and it is not too deep I often do not put a child through stitches as their hair will cover the scar. That is the antithesis to a facial laceration when we are all concerned about cosmetic appearance and even a smaller cut might get one or two stitches in order to have the best cosmetic result. If in doubt, take your child to the doctor or run them by your pediatrician's house (that works great for me on weekends) in order to decide if stitches are needed. Some clean cuts may be closed with a wonderful product called "Dermabond" which is almost like "super glue" for skin. Do NOT use super glue which one of my own children thought about using for an injury while they were at college. Thank goodness they called home first! Just remember that a lot of blood does not always mean a huge injury. That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

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