Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Play
355 views in 4 months
sports

Sports Performance

Daily Dose

Prevent Common Injuries

1.00 to read

This week, I saw two of my little patients who sustained very common injuries which served as good safety reminders to parents especially new ones. 

A 4 month old little girl was sitting in her Bumbo chair after her dad placed the chair on the counter while he was unloading groceries. Somehow the baby managed to squirm and tip the Bumbo chair off the counter.  She cried for a minute but then seemed to be fine so the parents felt as if they were lucky and no major injury had occurred. 

The following day they noted that she would not bear weight on one of her legs when she was being held to stand. They also thought the leg looked a bit swollen. The little girl was still happy and playful if you left her leg alone.  After being examined I sent her for an x-ray which showed that her tibia had a small fracture. 

Because the fracture was tiny and not displaced, the pediatric orthopedist did not need to cast the baby. I just saw her again and she is already bearing weight on her leg and all is well.  The mother’s comment was the side of the Bumbo chair clearly says “do not place on counter, but I guess Daddy did not read that!”  Reminder to all, put the chair on the floor and not up on something where it might tip off! 

Another toddler was in for a head injury which he sustained after a TV fell over on him.  He had climbed up to grab the remote from the top of the TV which then tipped over. Luckily he was not trapped under the TV, but he did have a big knot on his forehead.

The CDC reports that an estimated 13,700 children were treated in ER’s between 20008 - 2010 due to being “struck by a television”. With newer front heavy TV’s, it seems as if these injuries are on the rise. 

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that televisions are placed on low stands and push the TV back on the furniture as far as possible.  Ideally the TV and stand should be secured to the wall with appropriate anchoring devices as well. 

Two cute patients, worried yet relieved parents and no major injuries made for a good week.

That's your daily dose for today. We'll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Summer Means Head Lacerations

Parents are often frantic (as we all can be) when their child falls and you see blood coming from the head and face.Last weekend I had several phone calls about head lacerations. Summer is the season for accidents and it seems the weekends are always the busiest.

Parents are often frantic (as we all can be) when their child falls and you see blood coming from the head and face. Luckily, in most cases there is more blood than one would expect for the size of the injury, as the head is well vascularized and therefore even a small laceration will cause a lot of bleeding. The first thing to do is to get the child calmed down (and you too) and try and wash the area to really get an idea as to how large the laceration is. The patient who called could not get her child to let her look at her head (which showed that her child was okay if she could put up that much of a fight) so we had the idea of taking her toddler to the shower with the mother and to wash off there. That worked wonderfully and by then both mother and child had calmed down. Once you can see the cut, try to establish how deep and wide it is, and then see if you can stop the bleeding with pressure to the cut. If it is a scalp wound and you can stop the bleeding and it is not too deep I often do not put a child through stitches as their hair will cover the scar. That is the antithesis to a facial laceration when we are all concerned about cosmetic appearance and even a smaller cut might get one or two stitches in order to have the best cosmetic result. If in doubt, take your child to the doctor or run them by your pediatrician's house (that works great for me on weekends) in order to decide if stitches are needed. Some clean cuts may be closed with a wonderful product called "Dermabond" which is almost like "super glue" for skin. Do NOT use super glue which one of my own children thought about using for an injury while they were at college. Thank goodness they called home first! Just remember that a lot of blood does not always mean a huge injury. That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

Twisted Neck?

1:30 to read

Under the heading of “continuing to learn” every day…comes a new case.

 

A patient of mine who is 4 years old was playing with his brother the other morning while his mother was making their breakfast. He was a “well child” and woke up in a good mood, ready to eat and go to preschool.  She could see the boys playing while she was cooking and then suddenly the 4 year old started to scream and cry that his “neck hurt”.  At first she thought “he was pretending or over reacting” as there did not overtly seem to be anything wrong. The only thing she noticed is that he refused to turn his neck and held his head in an awkward position.

 

He continued to cry and actually scream - so she tried to calm him down and gave him some ibuprofen as well. Despite this he would not move his neck and was unconsolable, to the point that she almost took him to the ER but instead she brought him to the office.  He was noted to be crying and seemed uncomfortable and refused to move his neck at all.  His exam was otherwise normal. Even with careful questioning there was no history of trauma. He had slept through the night before this had occurred. He had a cold several weeks before, but had since improved. He did not have a fever.

 

He seemed to be in such pain that he was sent for neck X-rays which were read as normal. But he continued to be miserable….so who do you call?? 

 

I spoke to a pediatric orthopedic surgeon and he said he really did not have any ideas. Next call, the pediatric neurosurgeon. After hearing the symptoms he immediately said that he thought this little boy had “rotatory dislocation/subluxation” of the two upper cervical vertebrae in his neck (C-1 and C-2). He explained to me that in most cases the displacement resolves spontaneously, but in some cases the child continues to be uncomfortable as there is associated spasm of the sternocleidomastoid muscle, which causes the torticollis. (twisted neck).It may be seen in children after a recent upper respiratory infection and is then called Grisel Syndrome.

 

Treatment for the acute condition…pain control and muscle relaxation.  This was all news to me and I had to go to textbook (online of course) to even read about the condition.  The neurosurgeon walked me through treatment and the child was sent home on a very low dose of valium and continued ibuprofen. When I spoke to the mother later that evening the child was already more comfortable and had started to move his neck. 

 

I called her the following morning and she said that he had not required any further valium and slept well and was actually on his way to preschool! WOW….I was thrilled he was better so quickly and that I was that much “smarter”. Wonder if I will ever see rotatory subluxation of the cervical vertebra again? I’ll be ready.

Your Teen

Websites May Encourage Self-Injury

1.45 to read

The videos may be a focus for communities of youth in which self-injury is encouraged and viewed as normal and exciting, which could potentially increase the risk for self-injury.Some at-risk teens are finding new ways to hurt themselves thanks to a popular website with videos that glorify self-injury.

Young adults and teens may believe that hurting themselves is normal and acceptable after watching videos and other media on Web-sharing sites like YouTube, new research indicates. The findings, published in the journal Pediatrics, warn professionals and parents to be aware of the availability and dangers of such material for at-risk teens and young adults. Deliberate self-injury without the intent of committing suicide is called “non-suicidal self-injury” or NSSI. An estimated 14% to 24% of youth and young adults engage in this destructive behavior, according to the study. NSSI can also include relationship challenges, mental health symptoms, and risk for suicide and death, the study noted. Common forms of self-injury include cutting, burning, picking and embedding objects to cause pain or harm. While other studies have looked at the availability of online information about self-injury, the authors focused on the scope of self-injury in videos uploaded on YouTube and watched by youth. They described their work as the first such study and noted that their findings could be relevant in risk, prevention and managing self-injury. The authors focused on YouTube because, according to the site, since its inception in 2005 “YouTube is the world's most popular online video community, allowing millions of people to discover, watch and share originally-created videos.” Using the site’s search function the researchers looked for the terms “self-harm” and “self-injury,” identifying the site’s top 50 viewed videos containing a live person, and the top 50 viewed videos with words and photos or visual elements. The top 100 items that the study focused on were viewed over 2 million times, according to the analysis, and most – 80% - were available to a general audience. The analysis of the self-injury content found that 53% was delivered in a factual or educational tone, while 51% was delivered in a melancholic tone. Pictures and videos commonly showed explicit demonstrations of the self-harming behavior. Cutting was the most common type of behavior; more than half of the videos did not contain warnings about the graphic nature of the behavior. The average age of uploaders of the self-injury material was 25.39 years, according to the findings, and 95% were female. The authors surmise that the actual average age is probably younger because many YouTube users say they are older in order to access more content. The study concludes that the findings about the volume and nature of self-injury content on YouTube show "an alarming new trend among youth and young adults and a significant issue for researchers and mental health workers." The videos may be a focus for communities of youth in which self-injury is encouraged and viewed as normal and exciting, which could potentially increase the  risk for self-injury. The study warns that health professionals need to be aware of this type and source of content, and to inquire about it when working with youth who practice self-injury because sites like YouTube can reach youth who may not openly discuss their  behavior. Self-harming is not typical behavior for otherwise untroubled teens and young adults, explained Dr. Charles Raison, an Emory University psychiatrist and CNNHealth.com's mental health expert. It’s an action that kids with psychiatric problems may try. “NSSI is a young person’s affliction…one in ten will kill themselves," he said.   "A lot of people will outgrow the behavior.” Raison said that it’s common for troubled young people to share information about hurting themselves. Treatments can include antidepressants, antipsychotic drugs and psychotherapy.

Daily Dose

Paying Attention to the Road

I am always talking to my own children about paying attention to the road and having no other distractions in the car.As I was driving to work today, I routinely go through a school zone. Today was the day that they had motorcycle police using radar and ticketing those drivers who were not following the school zone speed limit. There were a lot of people pulled over getting tickets and a line waiting for the police officer.

This is the same school zone that my children walked through on their way to school, and therefore I am always aware of the speed limit as it is closest to my home. I am always amazed at the number of cars that go speeding by oblivious to the flashing yellow lights. But, I am also sure that I am not as aware of other areas of the city and those school zones. We all get preoccupied while driving and it seems to be related to other things going on in the car. Whether it is children fighting in the back seat, or the noise from a movie on the car DVD player, or the cell phone or blackberry, there are too many opportunities to have our attention diverted. I am always talking to my own children about paying attention to the road and having no other distractions in the car. I even went as far to have the radio disconnected when our oldest started driving (that didn't go over well!) Well, I think "us" parents need to heed the same advice. Stay off the phone in school zones, no texting while driving, and let's not have kids watching TV on their way to school. Instead, how about talking to the children in the back seat. Whether it is weather, sports, spelling words or quizzing math facts, talking to our kids is far better than any thing else we can find to do on the way to school. And if you find yourself in a school zone, and don't have kids in the car, just pay attention to the rules and enjoy the quiet. That's your daily dose, we'll chat tomorrow! Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

Dog Bites

1:30 to read

I am a dog lover and we have always had a dog in our house….even before we had our children.  But, some dogs will bite and unfortunately there are more than 800,000 people every year who receive medical care for a dog bite…more than half of these are children.

 

Children are also more likely to be severely injured from a dog bite…and I was reminded of this today when I saw a very serious dog bite to a child’s face.  The child was brought to my office by his nanny after being bitten on his cheek by the family’s dog.  It was one of the worst bites I have ever seen! He was severely injured and should have actually gone straight to the ER….the good news is that he will ok, but he had to undergo surgery to repair the bite and will probably require another small surgery at some later date. 

 

In this case as in most, the dog bite occurs when a child is interacting with a familiar dog, and in this case it was the family pet. The little boy is a toddler with a twin sister and they were playing when he was bitten.  The dog had been around the children since they were born…and it is unclear what precipitated the bite.  Sometimes a dog becomes aggressive if they are bothered while they are eating or sleeping…and you know toddlers, they can “bother” anyone. 

 

One of my “boys” is also a dog bite statistic.  He was raised with dogs (my sweet lab Maggie is at my feet as I am writing), so I was totally caught off guard one night when the phone rang. My son had been spending the night at a friend’s house (he was about 10 years old) and the voice on the other end of the phone was the father of the friend (he too a doctor), informing me that my child had been bitten by their dog.  It seemed the boys were laying on the floor on blankets watching a movie and eating popcorn and for some “unknown “ reason the dog bit my son on his face.  The bite was not precipitated by anything…they had not been playing or rough housing with the dog and the dog had not been known to be aggressive. The next words out of the father’s mouth…”do you know a good plastic surgeon?” Not words you want to hear from another physician.

 

Thankfully, I did know a good plastic surgeon who I awakened after his long day in the OR….and he got out of bed and met us to suture my son’s face with over 20 stitches. Luckily it only involved his nose, cheek and chin, just barely missing his left eye. I am sure I cried more than my son.  He still has a scar across his nose..which only bothers his mother.  Incredibly, he never “blamed” their dog, went back to play at their house, and still loves his own dogs more than anything.  My brother who is a vet still thinks that any dog that bites without provocation should not stay in the home with children…but that is one vet’s opinion. 

 

It is especially important to teach your children never to approach a dog to pet it without first asking the owner if it is okay.  Children should learn to move slowly and let the dog “sniff” them first and to stay away from their face and tail. Teach your child how to gently pet an animal and to always be gentle.  If they are around a dog who is behaving in a threatening manner by growling or barking, they should slowly back away from the dog and try to avoid eye contact with the dog. If they are ever knocked over by a dog they should curl up in and ball and protect their face with their arms.

If your child is bitten and it is superficial it will probably just require care with soap and water. For bites that break the skin you should check in with your pediatrician.  Make sure you know the rabies vaccination status of the dog that bit.  You also need to make sure that your child is up to date on their tetanus vaccination. In some cases your child may also need an antibiotic.

Daily Dose

Ice Burns!

1.00 to read

Many schools are in spring sports or playoff season which means I'm seeing a few strains and sprains in the office. 

The treatment recommendation for a sprain or strain is usually RICE which stands for rest, ice, compression, elevation.  I just saw an adolescent volleyball player who had started back to her volleyball work outs and “pulled a muscle”. So, she followed her coaches directions to “ice it”.  Unfortunately, she just put the ice pack directly onto her skin and she came in with an ice burn! OUCH!

Yes, ice can burn the skin and cause frostbite as well. When treating an injury with ice you need to make sure that you put a towel or sheeting between the ice and your skin.  In this patient’s case the ice burn looked similar to a sunburn, and did not blister or cause any severe damage. In fact, when she pulled up her pants to show me her leg she “quizzed me” to see if I could guess what had caused the redness.......guess what, knowing that she was an athlete helped me guess correctly!

The picture above shows her injury as well.

The treatment is similar to a thermal burn, apply a lubricant like Aquaphor or aloe vera, and let the skin slowly heal.  If it is blistered or has had severe damage to the skin you may need to see your doctor.

Remember, ice is good for injuries but cannot be applied directly to the skin.  

Daily Dose

Young Athletes and Overuse Injuries

I see more and more kids who come in with complaints of back pain, knee pain, ankle and elbow pain often secondary to repetitive motion from sports.We had a pediatric orthopedic surgeon on the show recently and we discussed overuse injuries in adolescent athletes. I see more and more kids who come in with complaints of back pain, knee pain, ankle and elbow pain often secondary to repetitive motion from sports.

They usually don't have a lot of swelling, and they complain of pain with their activity, but otherwise are fine. When taking a history their biggest complaints occur during the sport or immediately after, and they usually feel better after resting overnight.The pain re-occurs once they resume their work out the next day. The cycle is continuous. The best treatment for overuse injuries is to follow the pneumonic RICE: Rest, Ice, Compression and Elevation. For further relief of pain add an anti-inflammatory medication such as Aleve, Motrin or Advil. If the athlete can play through the pain, it does not awaken them throughout the night and they are fine attending school and other activities, they are probably fine to continue in the sport. If the pain becomes persistent during the day, disrupts their sleep etc, then they will need to have further evaluation. For persistent stress-related injuries rest may be the next step. Many times it is just necessary to let the body have some "time off" and may also involve stretching exercises to strengthen their core muscles, or yoga and Pilates to improve flexibility and strength. This is usually a four to six week period away from their sport. One caveat that was discussed was the importance of watching for depressive symptoms in an athlete who has had to take time off from their activity. Parents need to recognize not only the physical pain their child is experiencing, but also the child's emotional pain related to stopping their sport. Many of these kids have such passion for their sport and also gain a great deal of self worth from their participation. To take that away from them is emotionally devastating, and their young minds are not cognitively developed enough to deal with the loss of their athletic endeavors, even for a short time. Watch closely and be supportive and acknowledge their feelings. It is just as important to seek help for their mental health if that seems necessary. That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

Does your child have trouble going to the bathroom?

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.