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Your Baby

Recall: Infant Bathtubs Due to Drowning and Impact Injury


This recall involves 86,000 Summer Infant Lil’ Luxuries Whirlpool, Bubbling Spa & Shower with fabric slings.

Fabric slings on the recalled infant bathtubs can detach from the tub, posing a risk of impact injury and drowning.

CPSC and Summer Infant have received reports of 91 incidents of the sling detaching, including 11 reports of infants who received a bump to the head.

The infant bathtub is a battery-operated whirlpool bath with motorized jets intended for use with children from birth to 2 years. The product contains a fabric sling on a plastic frame onto which the infant is placed for bathing. The fabric sling on the recalled bathtubs does not have a white plastic attachment clip to hold the headrest area of the fabric sling to the plastic frame.

Recalled bathtubs have item numbers 18840, 18850, 18863, and 18873 and were sold between October 2012 and October 2013 with date codes starting with 1210, 1211, 1212, 1301, 1302, 1303, 1304, 1305, 1306, 1307, and 1308, which stand for the two-digit year followed by the two-digit month, on the fabric sling.

Consumers should immediately stop using the fabric sling in the recalled product and contact Summer Infant for a replacement fabric sling with a white plastic attachment clip. Consumers can contact Summer Infant toll free at 844-612-4254 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET on Friday, or online at and click on “Safety Alerts & Recalls” at the bottom of the page for more information.

The recalled items were sold at Toys R Us/Babies R Us and other juvenile product specialty stores nationwide from October 2012 through October 2013 for about $60. CPSC and Summer Infant warn consumers that these tubs could have been and could continue to be sold on the secondhand market.


Your Baby

Safety Recall: Infant Bicycle Helmets


Pacific Cycle is recalling about 129,000 bicycle helmets with magnetic no-pinch buckle chinstraps, due to choking and magnet ingestion hazards. These helmets are sold exclusively at Target stores.

The magnetic buckle on the helmet’s chinstrap contains small plastic covers and magnets that can come loose, posing a risk of choking and magnet ingestion to young children.

The helmets are made for infants ranging from one to three years old. The helmet and its straps come in various colors and design patterns. The buckles have small plastic covers and enclosed magnets. “SCHWINN” is printed on the front of the helmets. Only helmets with the magnetic no-pinch chinstrap buckles are affected by this recall.

Pacific Cycle has received three reports of the plastic cover coming loose. No injuries have been reported.

Consumers should immediately take the helmets away from children and contact Pacific Cycle for instructions on how to receive a free replacement helmet.

The helmets were sold exclusively at Target stores and online at from January 2014 through April 2016 for between $18 and $25.

Consumers can contact Pacific Cycle toll-free at 877-564-2261 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. CST Monday through Friday, email or online at and click on “Support” then “Safety & Recalls” or and click on “Product Recall” for more information. 


Your Child

New Guidelines for How Much Sleep Kids Really Need


As adults, we all know that without a good night’s sleep, we’re going to be struggling to get through the day’s activities. When we’re not running on all rested cylinders, small troubles seem like mountains, being able to focus and complete a project is difficult and nodding off while driving is more likely to happen.

Restful sleep is a wonderful thing and unfortunately, many of us just aren’t getting enough.

Most adults know about how much sleep they need the night before to feel their best the next day. Children, on the hand, need a certain amount of sleep depending on their age.

For the first time, a new set of sleep guidelines specially tailored to children, have been released from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The new recommendations give a precise number of hours for each age range, spanning from infancy up until 18 years old.

"Sleep is essential for a healthy life, and it is important to promote healthy sleep habits in early childhood," said Dr. Shalini Paruthi, fellow of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, in a statement. "It is especially important as children reach adolescence to continue to ensure that teens are able to get sufficient sleep."

A team of 13 top sleep experts conducted a 10-month research project to find out how much sleep children actually need. The team reviewed 864 published scientific articles that revealed the link between sleep duration and the health of children across all age categories.

Here’s what they found:

·      Infants between 4-12 months of age should get 12 to 16 hours of sleep for any 24-hour period. This includes naps.

·      Children between 1 and 2 years of age need 11 to 13 hours for every 24-hour period.

·      Children between 3 and 5 years old need a little less at 10 to 13 hours per 24-hour period.

·      Children between 6 and 12 years old need 9 to 12 hours of sleep – not including naps- in a 24-hour period.

·      Teens between 13 and 18 years old need 8 to 10 hours per 24-hour period.

All told, babies, kids, and teens spend roughly 40 percent of their childhood asleep, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

The panel points out that the right amount of shut-eye is critical for a child’s developing brain and body and overall mental and physical health.

Researchers also noted that when children do not get enough sleep, their behavior is affected and their long-term health can be negatively impacted.

"Adequate sleep duration for age on a regular basis leads to improved attention, behavior, learning, memory, emotional regulation, quality of life, and mental and physical health," the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) wrote. "Not getting enough sleep each night is associated with an increase in injuries, hypertension, obesity and depression, especially for teens who may experience increased risk of self-harm or suicidal thoughts."

According to Dr. Nathaniel Watson, the president of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, making sure that their child gets enough sleep is one of the best ways parents can lay a foundation of healthy habits that children can take with them into adulthood. With more than one third of the adult population sleep deprived, sleep becomes paramount for children to avoid the slew of consequences that come with a lifetime of sleep problems.

"The AAP endorses the guidelines and encourages pediatricians to discuss these recommendations and healthy sleep habits with parents and teens during clinical visits," they announced. "For infants and young children, establishing a bedtime routine is important to ensuring children get adequate sleep each night.”

Story source: Samantha Olson,

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