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Daily Dose

Jaundice in Newborns

1:30 to read

It is not at all uncommon for a healthy newborn to develop jaundice in the first several days of life. Bilirubin is produced when red blood cells are broken down. It is a yellow pigment that we all metabolize in the liver and then it is excreted in urine and stools. In an newborn, the body produces almost 2-3 times the bilirubin that an adult does. Because newborns are also “immature” their liver cannot keep up with the bilirubin production and therefore bilirubin levels rise. In some cases the bilirubin is high enough to cause a yellowing of the skin (jaundice), and this is termed physiologic jaundice of the newborn. 

 

Your infant will have their bilirubin level checked while they are in the hospital and your pediatrician will follow any bilirubin levels that seem to be rising. In most hospitals the bilirubin is tested transcutaneously (through the skin), and you may never know that you baby has been tested. If bilirubin levels seem to be high, a blood test will be performed to more accurately assess the bilirubin level. If bilirubin levels continue to rise a baby may then be put under phototherapy (special blue lights that breaks down bilirubin in the skin and help it to be eliminated). Phototherapy prevents extremely high levels of bilirubin which may get into the brain and could be toxic to the baby and cause brain damage.

 

When a baby is put under phototherapy they may be in a basinette or wrapped in a “bili-blanket”  and they will wear sunglasses to prevent any damage to their eyes from light. They are usually naked or only in a diaper so that as much skin is exposed as possible. In most cases the bilirubin levels have peaked by day of life 3 or 4 and the baby will no longer need phototherapy. While the baby is under the “bili-lights” they will continue to have blood tests (from their heels) to follow the bilirubin levels.

 

As babies are now being discharged in 24-48 hours after delivery some babies will develop jaundice after they have already gone home…so you your doctor will plan on seeing you 1 to 2 days after your are discharged. But, should you notice that your baby seems to be getting more jaundiced you should call you doctor and be seen sooner.  

 

Just this week I saw a baby who continued to become more jaundiced after he went home. At times I see this when a mother is breast feeding and her milk has not yet “come in”.  If a baby is not getting a lot of milk then they cannot poop and pee out bilirubin…somethings just take time to get going with feeding, peeing, pooping and liver maturation. So…this baby boy was started o home phototherapy. Rather than re-admitting him to the hospital, a pediatric home health care company sent out a nurse with a bill blanket who instructed the parents on the use of it. The baby was then able to feed at home every 2-3 hours, and the bili-blanket was used throughout the day and night. The parents lived so close to the office that they would bring the baby in for bilirubin tests, while in other cases the nurse will go to the home to do the testing.  Home phototherapy in an otherwise healthy infant does not disrupt the new family and really helps the mother establish her breast feeding and lets “everyone” sleep in their own beds!

 

This baby only required phototherapy for 24 hours…in some babies it may be longer. Once the bilirubin was back in a “safe range” the lights were discontinued and he will continue to process the bilirubin on his own. His little yellow face and eyes will be the last evidence of his newborn jaundice and “one for the baby books” as it should never be a problem again.

 

Your Baby

Choosing the Safest Fish to Eat During Pregnancy

2:00

As a parent or an expectant mom, you may have travelled down the same path as many others- searching for the healthiest diet for your family or soon-to-be newborn.

Fish is one of the foods that rank high on the healthy food chart. It’s frequently referred to as a “brain food” because of its brain-boosting nutrients, particularly omega-3 fatty acid. Certain fish are an excellent choice while others may contain high levels of mercury; a known toxin than can harm a developing child.

Mercury is a common seafood pollutant. This neurotoxic chemical can harm a baby’s developing brain in utero, even at very low levels of exposure.

Seas are increasingly polluted by toxic chemicals from 2 major sources: small gold mines and coal fired power plants, according to a recent report by Healthy Babies Bright Futures (HBBF.)

Mercury in a mother’s body can be transferred to her fetus during pregnancy, exposing the developing fetus to the potent neurotoxin.

The report states that millions of women of childbearing age who eat mercury -contaminated fish have enough of the toxic chemicals in their bodies to harm a developing child. “55% of the global sample of women measured more than 0.58ppm of mercury, a level associated with the onset of fetal neurological damage.” This is the finding of a new, first of its kind report on mercury levels in women of childbearing age in 25 countries by HBBF partner, IPEN: the International POPs Elimination Network

While these findings may make you wonder if any fish are safe to eat, many health experts recommend that women who are pregnant should not give up eating fish out of fear of mercury toxins, but should focus on eating fish found to be very low in mercury. These include: wild Alaska salmon, sardines from the Pacific, farmed mussels, farmed rainbow trout, and Atlantic mackerel (not trawled).  

High mercury risk fish to avoid include shark, swordfish, orange roughy. bigeye tuna, king mackerel and marlin.

The FDA and the EPA joined forces this year and released new guidelines on fish consumption for pregnant women or those who might become pregnant, breastfeeding mothers and parents of young children. To governmental agencies created a chart to help these consumers more easily understand the types of fish to select. The agencies have an easy-to-use reference chart that sorts 62 types of fish into three categories:

  • “Best choices” (eat two to three servings a week)
  • “Good choices” (eat one serving a week)
  • “Fish to avoid”

Fish in the “best choices” category make up nearly 90 percent of fish eaten in the United States. The chart can be found online at https://www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/ucm393070.htm

The HBBF report also includes a warning about canned tuna. Limit your intake of canned tuna. While tuna is higher in Omega 3s and nutrients than most fish, the mercury levels can vary in individual tuna. Light canned tuna is recommended over white tuna; however, HBBF notes in their report that scientists found that for both types, the potential harm to a baby’s brain exceeds the fish nutrients’ brain-boosting assets.

One tip to remember is that larger fish tend to absorb more mercury than smaller types of fish. Fish should not be eliminated from any family’s diet; the benefits far outweigh the dangers. However, it’s important to choose fish that are known to be lower in mercury for a healthier outcome.

Story sources:  Charlotte Brody, RN, http://blog.hbbf.org/toxic-mercury-and-your-babys-ability-to-learn/

https://www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/ucm393070.htm

 

Your Child

Bowlegs and Knock-Knees in Kids

2:00

Parents may be concerned when they notice their toddler seems to be bowlegged or knock-kneed. Typically, there’s nothing to worry about, it’s just part of his or her growth development.

The medical term is genu valgum, but the condition is more commonly called bow-legged or knock-kneed. It usually becomes noticeable when a child is 2 to 3 years old, and it may increase in severity until about age 4. It usually self-corrects by the time a child is about 7 or 8 years old. But if the condition doesn’t appear until a child is 6 or older, it could be a sign that there is an underlying bone disease.

During early childhood, knock-knees actually help a child to maintain balance, particularly when the child begins to walk, or if the foot rolls inward or turns outward. When a child has knock-knees, both knees usually lean inward symmetrically. One knee, however, may "knock" less than the other or may even remain straight.

Sometimes, the condition will persist into the teen years. It’s also more common in girls, although boys can develop it too.

Knock knees are usually part of the normal growth and development of the lower extremities. In some cases, it may be a sign of an underlying bone disease, such as Osteomalacia or rickets.

Obesity can contribute to knock knees—or can cause walking problems that resemble, but aren’t actually, knock-knees. The condition can occasionally result from an injury to the growth area of the shinbone (tibia), which may result in just one knocked knee.

Typically, a child’s legs will straighten naturally by the teen years. Bracing, corrective shoes, and exercise are rarely helpful, and may hinder a child’s physical development and cause unnecessary emotional stress, when the child is very young. Rarely, bowlegs or knock-knees are the result of a disease. Arthritis, injury to the growth plate around the knee, infection, tumor, Blount’s disease (a growth disorder of the shinbone), and rickets all can cause changes in the curvature of the legs. 

There are signs to look for that may indicate that a child’s bowlegs or knock-knees are caused by a more serious medical problem:

·      The curvature is extreme.

·      Only one side is affected.

·      The bowlegs get worse after two years of age.

·      The knock-knees persist after seven years of age.

·      Your child is unusually short for his or her age.

·      There is pain in the knees or in the feet, hips or ankles.

·      Stiff joints.

If your child is experiencing any of these symptoms, your pediatrician should examine him or her.

The good news is that most cases of knock-knees or bowlegs will resolve before a child reaches adolescence. However, if it doesn’t and is left untreated, it can lead to further health problems with joints and muscles, including osteoporosis.

Treatment will depend on the cause and the severity. If there is an underlying disease present, medications and supplements may help resolve the condition. A physical therapist may be able to offer some simple exercises and stretches that help strengthen the muscles and realign the knees. Weight loss is recommended when obesity is a contributing factor. Extra weight puts additional strain on the legs and knees, which can cause knock-knees to worsen. Surgery is the last line of treatment but is typically only recommended in very severe cases.

Children’s health experts suggests that parents not panic if their little one has knock-knees, but that they keep an eye on the condition and see if it goes away as the child gets older. At times, children may not have straight lower legs until they are nine or ten years old.

Story sources: https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/orthopedic/Pages/Bowlegs-and-Knock-Knees.aspx

Jenna Fletcher, https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319894.php

 

 

Your Teen

More Teens Getting Tattoos and Piercings

2:00

To many a parent’s chagrin, tattoos and piercings have skyrocketed in popularity among teenagers. While mom and dad may not want to have a serious discussion about the pros and cons of getting a tattoo or body part pierced with their adolescent, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says pediatricians should be taking to their patients about the health risks and providing safety guidelines.

The AAP released its first report this week regarding tattooing and piercing for adolescents and young adults. The report discusses health risk issues from tattoos and piercings as well providing guidelines to talk to about important safety measures.

"Let's face it, kids are getting tattoos or piercings now," said Dr. Jay Greenspan, chairman of pediatrics at Nemours/A.I. Dupont Hospital for Children. "We know it's mainstream and we want the medical community to be a part of it."

It's unclear how many American teenagers have tattoos and piercings. The report cited a Pew Research Center study that said about 38 percent of young people ages 18 to 29 have at least one tattoo.

In some states, it’s illegal for someone to tattoo or body pierce a minor without the parent’s written consent. But we’re talking about teens here, and where there is a will; there is often a way found around any constraints.  That’s why Greenspan believes that an honest discussion is necessary.

Ten years ago, there was an association between tattoos and alcohol, drug use, violence, sexual activity, eating disorders and even suicide. But that's not the case anymore, the report said.

Today’s teens are more likely to associate tattoos and body piercings with celebrities and sports figures than with the seedier side of life.

Seventy-two percent of teens that have tattoos have them in places that can be covered, the report said. High-ear cartilage is one of the most common visible piercings, followed by navel, tongue and nipple and genital. 

While the rate of tattoo complications is unclear, the AAP believes it's likely low. Common tattoo complications can be inflammation, infections and neoplasms. Preexisting conditions like psoriasis, systemic lupus and sarcoidosis can lead to reactions.

Data on body piercing complications is also minimal. What is known is that teenagers who have a higher risk of infection, particularly those who are diabetic or taking blood thinning medication, may have a greater risk of complications when getting a piercing. 

For piercings, stainless steel posts and studs are recommended to avoid skin reactions. Cheaper products typically have lower quality materials that can lead to a reaction.

So, what do you do if your teen wants a tattoo on their arm or stud placed in their eyebrow? Once you’ve talked it through and if you decide that you’re ok with it, make sure to find a reputable parlor (there are many) and consult with your doctor beforehand to learn how to care for and what to expect during the healing process. Tattoos and body piercings may have become a trend that won’t go away, but they still involve needles and require that certain precautions be taken.

Story source: Meredith Newman, https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/09/20/young-people-tattoos-and-piercings-report/686360001/

 

Your Child

Young Kids Still Being Injured or Killed in ATVs Accidents

2:30

Despite safety warnings from pediatricians and child health experts, children under 16 are still driving or riding as passengers on all-terrain vehicles.  The number of young kids being injured or killed in ATV accidents has not changed much in recent years, according to a new study.

Since 2000, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has recommended that ATV use be restricted to youth aged 16 years and older who wear helmets, don’t take passengers and steer clear of roads.

“Too many young children are driving these machines - equivalent to a motorcycle in many ways,” said senior study author Dr. William Hennrikus, medical director of the Pediatric Bone and Joint Clinic at Penn State College of Medicine in Hershey, Pennsylvania. 

“Children should not drive an ATV until they’re over 16, just like driving a motorcycle,” Hennrikus said by email to Reuters. “Helmets should always be worn, just like a motorcycle.”

For the study, researchers examined data on 1,912 patients under age 18 who were injured while using an ATV and treated at trauma centers in Pennsylvania from 2004 to 2014. 

During this period, 28 children died in ATV crashes, a mortality rate of roughly one per every 100,000 kids in the population, researchers calculated.

Fewer than half of the children were wearing helmets and a street or roadway was were 15% of the crashes happened. Rural areas tend to have more ATV crashes.

Being a passenger or being pulled by the ATV was a factor in almost one in four injuries, the study also found. 

Half of the kids involved in ATV crashes were 14 or younger, and about 6 percent were no more than 5 years old. 

Boys accounted for three in every four patients.

Limitations of the study include the possibility that researchers underestimated injuries and deaths because they only looked at trauma center patients, not children who were treated elsewhere or died before they ever reached a trauma center.

Experts agree that age isn’t the only factor parents should consider when letting their child drive an ATV.

“Parents need to think not just about their child’s size, but also their ability to think, to react to emergency situations and to maintain safe, cautious control of a very powerful vehicle,” said David Schwebel, a sports injury researcher at the University of Alabama at Birmingham who wasn’t involved in the study.

All across the country children are riding on or driving ATVs with sometimes-serious consequences. Just in the past few months a 12-year old boy from New York died from injuries in an ATV crash. A 15-year old boy in Illinois was killed and his passenger, his 12-year old sister, was seriously injured when he lost control of the ATV. A 14-year old boy was killed in New Jersey after losing control and crashing his ATV into another 14-year olds ATV; 2 other children were seriously injured from that crash. None of the children were wearing helmets or seatbelts. 

“Helmets absolutely have to be used for any ride, even short, apparently safe ones,” Schwebel said by email. “Passengers should never ride on ATVs unless the ATV is designed for more than one person.”

While ATVs can be dangerous for adults, they pose a much higher risk for children.

“Children are not developmentally capable of operating these heavy, complex machines,” Sandra Hassink, president of the AAP, said. “The American Academy of Pediatrics warns all parents that no child under the age of 16 should drive or ride an ATV.”

Story source: Lisa Rapaport, http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-children-atv-injuries-idUSKBN1A422F

https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/pages/AAPCFAATVs.aspx

 

Your Teen

Teens Getting Less and Less Sleep

2:00

Today’s American teens are getting a whole lot less sleep than they did in the 90s according to a new study. Too little sleep makes focusing difficult and depletes one’s energy. As a result, school performance often suffers and unhealthy and/or unwise decisions are much easier to make.

Just 63 percent of 15-year-olds reported getting seven or more hours of sleep a night in 2012. That number is down from 72 percent in 1991, according to the study.

Between the ages of 13 and 18, teens getting 7 hours or more of sleep a night plummets. At 13, roughly two-thirds of teens get at least seven hours of sleep a night; by 18 that percentage drops to about one-third.

"After age 16, the majority are not meeting the recommended guidelines," said study author Katherine Keyes, an assistant professor of epidemiology at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health in New York City.

Why is it so important that teens get enough sleep? A lack of sleep can impact just about every part of their life. Hormones are escalating, social interactions are fragile, school demands are heightened, self-image is developing and many begin testing boundaries with parents, teachers and each other. It can be a rugged time for teens and those around them.

For the study, researchers from Columbia University looked at sleep data from a national survey of more than 270,000 teens from 1991 to 2012. Each year, teens reported how often they got seven or more hours of sleep, as well as how often they got less sleep than they need.

The most recent recommendation from the National Sleep Foundation says teens aged 14 to 17 need eight to 10 hours a night and people aged 18 to 25 need seven to nine hours.

The largest declines in those getting enough sleep occurred between 1991 through 2000; then the problem plateaued, Keyes said.

Researchers also found that girls were less likely to get an adequate amount of sleep compared to boys.

So what’s causing the decline? There a several theories about what may be contributing to this downward slide in teen sleep.

Keyes did not have access to information about the teens' use of electronic media, a factor often blamed for lack of sleep as teens text, check social media, play video games and work on laptops late into the night. However, that might be a factor, she said.

"On an individual level, excessive use of technology may impair an adolescent's ability to sleep," Keyes said.

Caffeine may also be a culprit. It’s estimated that about 30 percent of adolescents report consuming energy drinks which are packed with caffeine. Many teens drink specialty coffees as well.

Another issue may be early school start times. Some sleep disorder experts believe that starting school – even an hour later- could help teens get more valuable sleep. Starting school, for instance at 8:30 a.m., is an approach favored by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Other studies have noted that a lack of sleep is linked with many other teen health problems including obesity, car accidents, depression and a drop in school performance.

When kids are younger, parents are more likely to set limits on bedtime behavior as well as bedtimes. Once kids reach their teens, some of those limits may get a little lax, but this is the time when they are needed most.

Parents still have the authority to set a bedtime and require that computers, tablets and phones are off at least an hour before bedtime. Many kids (and adults) are addicted to their smartphones, so it’s a tough rule to set; it takes a strong commitment and a good example for it to work.

Lack of sleep is hard on everyone, but teens really need the extra help to stay healthy and function well in school. It has such a big impact not only on their present but for their future as well.

Source: Kathleen Doheny, http://www.webmd.com/children/news/20150216/us-teens-getting-less-sleep-than-ever

Your Child

Tips to Keep Your Child’s Room Allergen-Free

2:15

Symptoms such as sneezing, stuffy or runny nose, watery eyes and itchy nose, throat and eyes or roof of the mouth are common in children that suffer from respiratory allergies. If you’re looking for ways to help reduce your child’s exposure to allergens that hide within homes, one place you can start is in his or her bedroom. 

Typical allergens include: dust mites, pet dander, pollen, mold and pests.

Dust Mites- Dr. David Stukus, associate professor of pediatrics in the division of allergy and immunology at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, offers these suggestions for reducing dust mites:

·      Use zippered, dust mite-proof bed covers. These covers are made of materials with pores that are too small to let dust mites and their waste products through, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA). They should cover the mattress, box spring, and all pillows on the bed.

·      Wash bed linens at least once a week. This should be done using a hot water setting to kill and remove as many dust mites as possible, as well as the skin cells they feed on. The water should be at least 130 degrees Fahrenheit, according to the AAFA.

·      Remove or treat stuffed animals. “Ideally, stuffed animals should be removed from the bed completely,” Stukus says. An alternative solution is to keep one favorite stuffed toy on the bed and put it in the freezer for 24 hours once a week, then put it through a dryer cycle to kill and remove dust mites.

·       Remove carpets. Dust mites can thrive in carpeting. Avoid wall-to-wall carpeting and opt for hardwood floors or throw rugs instead. Just make sure to regularly wash or dry clean throw rugs, notes the American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology. Dust mites can also hide in curtains, blinds, and upholstered furniture, according to the AAFA, so you may also want to avoid having these in your child’s room.

Pet Dander – Some breed may be touted as a “hypoallergenic dog or cat,” but Stukus says there is no such thing. Any animal can bring dander into the house. To keep dander out of your child’s room, try these steps:

·      The first step is to keep pets out of your child’s bedroom. It’s not as easy as it sounds, especially when your child becomes attached to a family pet. “Any access to animals, even for limited periods of time, will increase the dander levels in the room,” Stukus says. Depending on how serious your child’s symptoms are, you may want to consider not having a pet.

·      If you decide that having a pet is ok, Stukus suggests that you bathe your pet once or twice a week. “Families usually laugh when I suggest this,” Stukus says, but it’s an effective way to reduce dander.” Some pets can handle a bath that often, but others will develop skin conditions from excess cleaning. Discuss your pet’s breed and care with a veterinarian before trying this.

·       Vacuum and dust the room at least weekly. This can help remove any dander that makes its way into the bedroom. The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology recommends using a vacuum with a HEPA filter to reduce pet dander, as well as other allergens.

Pollen - One of the worse allergens is pollen. There’s no hiding from it but there are ways to help make the bedroom a “safe zone” when the pollen count is high.

·      Keep the windows closed. It may be tempting to open the window when the weather is cool and the idea of a little breeze to air things out sounds appealing, but even short periods of an open window can let pollen into the room.

·      Use air conditioning.  This can help filter pollen out of the air and provide a comfortable room temperature when days and evenings are warm. When winter sets in, pollen is usually not a problem.

Mold- In the early 2000s, a toxic mold panic swept the nation. Today, a lot more is understood about the various types of mold. While mold can become a problem, it’s a common substance. “Mold is everywhere in our world, but it rarely poses a problem unless you have obvious overgrowth,” Stukus says. This is often visible in the form of large stains or black spots on drywall or other surfaces.

·      If you notice mold in your child’s bedroom, treat the source of the moisture.

·      Excess mold is almost always caused by an errant source of water, such as a leak from the outside or a pipe inside the house. In some cases, you may also need to remove and replace the mold-covered surface in the room.

Pests – Many people aren’t aware of how cockroaches (and even ladybugs) can cause a respiratory illness. If insects or other pests are a problem in your child’s bedroom:

·      Keep food and drinks out of the bedroom. “Cockroaches generally congregate towards areas with water and food,” Stukus says, which is why they’re typically found in kitchens and bathrooms.

·      Fix water leaks. If cockroaches or other pests are found in your child’s bedroom despite the absence of food and beverages, then you may have water leakage that needs to be fixed. This can be a problem in certain public and rental housing, he says.

If you need to contact your landlord about fixing a problem related to your child’s allergies, it’s a good idea to include as much documentation as possible, including a letter from an allergist, Stukus says.

Can children outgrow allergies? Sometimes. Respiratory allergies such as seasonal allergic rhinitis (hay fever) can fade over time or improve.

The first step in helping your child cope with allergies is to have him or her tested for allergens to find out what triggers a reaction. Your pediatrician or allergist will then be able to prescribe medications and or provide more information on other treatments or solutions.

Story source: Quinn Phillips, https://www.everydayhealth.com/hs/managing-respiratory-allergies-children/keep-bedroom-allergy-free/

Your Teen

Teenage Girls May Take Longer to Recover From Concussions

2:00

Teenage boys and girls can both suffer a concussion during sports activities; however, female athletes may take more than twice as long to fully recover, according to a new study.

Researchers examined data on 110 male and 102 female athletes, ranging in age from 11 to 18 years, who sustained their first concussion while participating in sports. 

To assess the duration of symptoms, the researchers examined patient records for young athletes treated for concussions at one medical practice in New Jersey from 2011 to 2013. The athletes were 15 years old on average.

Half of the girls reported still having symptoms at least 28 days after sustaining a concussion, while half of the boys no longer had symptoms after 11 days, the study found.

Boys were more likely to receive their injuries while participating in football, soccer, wrestling, lacrosse and ice hockey. Most of the girls’ injuries were from soccer, basketball, softball, field hockey or cheerleading.

Overall, 75 percent of the boys recovered from their concussions within three weeks, compared to just 42 percent of girls.

Researchers acknowledge that the study was a small group and focused on a single medical practice.

It’s also possible that some of the difference in recovery time for boys and girls was due to pre-existing medical conditions, notes one injury prevention director.

According to Dr. Mark Halstead, director of the Sports Concussion Clinic at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, females that who participate in similar sports as males have a higher rate of concussion.

“Boys and girls likely have different recovery courses, but we have to treat each concussion individually,” Halstead, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email to Reuters Health. . “Adult coaches need to create an environment and culture for their players that stresses that a concussion is an important injury to not downplay and encourage the reporting of symptoms.”

Experts agree that the most important take-away from the study is that it is extremely important for adolescents who sustain a concussion to seek proper care and follow through with recommended treatment and rest following an injury.

A teenager, like an adult, may lose consciousness after getting a concussion, but the majority of people do not pass out after a head injury.

Watch for these symptoms if your teen has suffered a head injury:

·      Dizziness

·      A headache that lasts more than a few minutes

·      Trouble with vision, balance or coordination

·      Nausea or vomiting

·      Difficulty concentrating, thinking or making decisions

·      Trouble speaking, slurring or making sense

·      Confusion, sleepiness, emotional for no reason

·      Seizures

If your child experiences a head injury, make sure that a doctor examines him or her. If any of these symptoms persists, seek immediate medical attention. Concussions should always be taken seriously.

Story source: Lisa Rapaport; http://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-girls-concussion-sport/after-concussion-teen-girls-may-take-longer-to-heal-than-boys-idUSKBN1CH2SS

http://kidshealth.org/en/teens/concussions.html

 

 

Your Baby

Type1 Diabetes and Celiac Disease

2:00

Celiac disease is a serious immune disorder that can occur in children and adults. The disease causes the immune system to attack the lining of the small intestine when gluten is consumed, according to the Celiac Disease Foundation. Gluten is a protein found in wheat. Celiac disease may develop any time after wheat or other gluten containing foods are introduced into the diet, typically after 6-9 months of age.

New research suggests that parents of young children with type1 diabetes should be on the lookout for symptoms of celiac disease as well.

The study found these youngsters appear to face a nearly tripled risk of developing celiac disease autoantibodies, which eventually can lead to the disorder.

"Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease are closely related genetically," explained study author Dr. William Hagopian.

"People with one disease tend to get the other. People who have type 1 diabetes autoantibodies should get screened for celiac autoantibodies," Hagopian said. He directs the diabetes program at the Pacific Northwest Research Institute in Seattle.

Symptoms of celiac disease include stomach pain and bloating, diarrhea, vomiting, constipation, weight loss, fatigue and delayed growth and puberty.

Dr. James Grendell is chief of the division of gastroenterology at NYU Winthrop Hospital in Mineola, N.Y. He explained why knowing ahead of time that celiac may be developing can be helpful. 

"Early diagnosis of celiac disease is important to initiate treatment with a gluten-free diet to prevent complications, particularly growth retardation in children," he said.

"Other significant complications include iron-deficiency anemia, osteoporosis and a form of skin rash. Less common, but potentially lethal, complications include lymphoma and carcinoma of the small intestine," Grendell added.

Treatment for the disease is avoiding eating or drinking anything that contains gluten. Fortunately these days, there are many products that typically contain gluten but are now offered gluten-free. These products usually cost more than their gluten counterparts, but offer more of a variety in the diet.

While the study did find a link between type1 diabetes and celiac disease, that doesn’t mean that type1 diabetes necessarily causes celiac disease.

However, parents should be aware that if their child has type1 diabetes, he or she should be screened for celiac disease. Early intervention with the proper diet can increase the possibility of a good outcome as their child ages.

Story source: Serena Gordon, https://consumer.healthday.com/diabetes-information-10/type-i-diabetes-news-182/where-there-s-type-1-diabetes-celiac-disease-may-follow-727354.html

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