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Parenting

New Dads Can Suffer Depression Too

1:45

While a lot of research has been done on post-partum depression among women, new fathers have often been overlooked.  A new study from New Zealand, says new dads can experience similar symptoms during the pregnancy and after the birth of their child.

Expectant and new fathers who are in poor health or have high levels of stress are at increased risk for depression, the research showed.

"It is important to recognize and treat symptoms among fathers early and the first step in doing that is arguably increasing awareness," said a team led by Lisa Underwood of the University of Auckland.

The study involved more than 3,500 men. The average age was 33 years old. They were interviewed when their partner was in her third trimester of pregnancy and then again, nine months after the birth of their infant.

Elevated depression symptoms were reported by 2.3 percent of the men during their partner's pregnancy and by 4.3 percent of the men nine months after their child was born, Underwood's team found.

Men who were under a lot of stress or in poor health experienced elevated depression symptoms, the findings showed.

Other, social or relationship factors such as no longer being in a relationship with the mother and/or unemployed also increased the odds for being depressed after their newborn arrived, the study authors noted.

Other mental health experts agree that depression in new dads is understudied and not often considered when dads are feeling the nervousness of welcoming a child into the household.

Dr. Tina Walch, medical director at South Oaks Hospital in Amityville, N.Y., noted that understanding and spotting the signs of paternal depression early "is the first step toward prevention or early treatment and improved health outcomes for fathers, mothers and their children."

More often than not, moms-to-be garner most of the attention during and after the birth of a child. They are after all, the one carrying and delivering a newborn in to the world. Dads have frequently been overlooked during the whole process. Not only do new moms sometimes need help with post-partum depression or just dealing with the overwhelming responsibility that comes with having a child, dads do too. If they seek help and reach out for support, the family unit can be better for it.

The study was recently published online in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

Story source: Robert Preidt, http://www.webmd.com/baby/news/20170216/hey-fellas-depression-can-strike-expectant-and-new-dads-too

Your Child

Are First Born Children Smarter?

1:30

Who’s the smartest among your siblings? If you’re the first born, then you are, according to a new study.

Researchers from the University of Edinburgh, the Analysis Group and the University of Sydney found that children who were born first typically scored higher on IQ tests than their younger siblings.

First-born children may have better thinking skills than their siblings because they received more mental stimulation during their early stages of development, researchers said.

For the study, researchers used data from the U.S. Children of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth on nearly 5,000 children who were monitored from pre-birth to age 14. Every two years, the children in the survey were assessed on a variety of categories, including reading, vocabulary assessment and matching letters.

The research found that firstborn children typically perform better than their siblings as early as age 1, which could be due to how parents treat subsequent children. According to the study, parents were less likely to partake in mentally stimulating activities with their younger children, meaning they may not have developed the same thinking skills as the older sibling.

The results from this study are similar to other studies that have looked at whether birth order plays a role in IQ level and personality traits.

While the study has similar findings as other studies along this line, siblings may beg to differ as to who is actually the smartest in the family.

The study was published in the Journal of Human Resources.

Story source: Mary Bowerman, http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/02/13/study-first-born-children-smarter-than-their-siblings/97846312/

Daily Dose

Fit Foods for a Healthy Lifestyle

1:15 to read

Wherever you are on your healthy lifestyle journey, you are not alone.  I tell my patients that the key to being healthy is being disciplined in eating the right foods, staying active and getting enough sleep...and that’s for both you and your kids.

Committing to your overall health and wellness should start early on.  When you’re pregnant, it doesn’t always mean you’re eating for two. A growing baby needs nourishment from their mother’s diet throughout the day but experts say nutrition during pregnancy should be about adding extra nutrients and not extra meals. Moms to be need to be eating foods that are good for them and their baby.  You just need to choose the right ones.

Avocados are a power food loaded with critical vitamins and minerals pregnant moms need to pass along to their unborn baby.  Nutrients like folate which helps prevent birth defects of your baby’s brain and spinal cord. Avocados contain powerful antioxidants like lutein an ingredient found in breast milk which is known to protect important cells in a baby’s eye. 

It’s so important for pregnant moms to consume a host vitamins and minerals and avocados are a great resource.  You might say avocados are a very similar to a prenatal vitamin!  And avocados may even help reduce morning sickness!

And the health benefits of avocados don’t stop once your baby is born.  If you’re breastfeeding…avocados are high in monounsaturated fats which are good fats and are important for a baby’s weight gain, growth and brain development. 

Avocados are the perfect first food for your baby.   Between 4 and 6 months you can introduce avocados into your child’s diet.  They work perfectly because they are easily mashed and slightly sweet.  This is a good time to introduce new food textures as well.

What’s the foolproof way to know that your family’s favorite fruit is ripe?  Push lightly near the neck and feel for a gentle yield.  If you’re still not sure it’s ready to eat? Pop the stem button.  If the stem button pops off easily, then the fruit is ready to eat.

Moms and dads…we always put our children first…so don’t forget about yourselves.  Avocados are a fit food fruit.  Studies show avocados may reduce total cholesterol levels while they lower bad cholesterol and increase good cholesterol.

Avocados are also loaded with dietary fiber which may help you lose weight and reduce blood sugar spikes.

The next time you’re grocery shopping, make sure you add a few avocados to your cart.  They’re nutritious, heart healthy and taste delicious.  They’re good for you and everyone in your family! What more could you ask for in a fruit?

For more information, visit worldsfinestavocados.com.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your Child

New Flu Vaccine for 2015-2016

1:45

Last year’s flu vaccine wasn’t as effective as previous vaccines, but this year’s vaccine should be a much better match according to Dr. Tom Frieden, Director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.   

Typically, the vaccine is 50 to 60 percent effective, making your chances of getting the flu reduced by as much as 60 percent if you get a flu shot.

This year’s flu vaccine contains the H3N2 strain, Frieden said. Last year's vaccine was only 13 percent effective against the H3N2 strain. As a result, "more seniors were hospitalized for the flu than ever before."

What's more, 145 children died from the flu, Frieden said, adding that the actual number was "probably much higher since many flu deaths aren't reported."

About 50 percent of the American population gets vaccinated every flu season. That includes pregnant women. More people, including pregnant women, need to be vaccinated, Frieden said.

The CDC recommends that everyone 6 months of age and older get the flu shot every year.

Frieden said there's an adequate supply of flu vaccine this year. Companies are expected to make 170 million doses of vaccine, of which 40 million have already been distributed, he said.

People at risk of flu-related complications include young children, especially those younger than 2 years; people over 65; pregnant women; and people with chronic health problems, such as asthma, heart disease and diabetes, as well as those with weakened immune systems, according to the CDC.

Most seasonal flu activity typically occurs between October and May. Flu activity most commonly peaks in the United States between December and February.

Children younger than 6 months are at higher risk of serious flu complications, but are too young to get a flu vaccine. Because of this, safeguarding them from flu is especially important. If you live with or care for an infant younger than 6 months of age you should get a flu vaccine to help protect them from flu.

It takes about two weeks after vaccination for antibodies to develop in the body and provide protection against the flu.

The CDC encourages people to get a flu shot preferably by October. Those children aged 6 months through 8 years who need two doses of vaccine should receive the first dose as soon as possible to allow time to get the second dose before the start of flu season. The two doses should be given at least four weeks apart.

During this flu season:

•       Intramuscular (IM) vaccines will be available in both trivalent and quadrivalent formulations. (High dose vaccines, which are IM vaccines, will all be trivalent this season.)

•       For people who are 18 through 64 years old, a jet injector can be used for delivery of one particular trivalent flu vaccine.

•       Nasal spray vaccines will all be quadrivalent this season.

•       Intradermal vaccine will all be quadrivalent.

The quadrivalent flu vaccine is designed to protect against four different flu viruses; two influenza A viruses and two influenza B viruses.

It’s hard to believe that we’re about to head into the flu season, particularly with so many states still experiencing summer like weather. But we are, and getting a flu shot early can help protect you and your family from a virus no one wants to get.

Sources: Steven Reinberg, http://consumer.healthday.com/infectious-disease-information-21/flu-news-314/no-embargo-this-year-s-flu-vaccine-better-match-703392.html

http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/season/flu-season-2015-2016.htm

Daily Dose

Don't Let Your Child Become an Obesity Statistic

Healthy eating begins with the first foods that you feed your infant.An alarming statistic was released today which shows that one in five 4-year-old children are obese and these numbers are even higher in minority children. This study was just published in The Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, and followed over 8,000 children looking at height and weight. The findings were quite concerning, showing a trend toward obesity at an age younger than predicted, and numerous long term health problems associated with obesity, such as heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure and bone and joint problems.

This is a national health issue and a call to action for all families to teach and model healthy eating. One of the problems is that many of the government sponsored food programs provide foods high in carbohydrates, and low in fresh fruits and vegetables, and this promotes obesity. School lunches have also been found to be high in fat and carbohydrate and continue to promote poor food choices. With the bad economy and recession, families have cut back on groceries and may be eating more fast foods, breads and pastas, again providing more carbohydrate than protein. Healthy eating begins with the first foods that you feed your infant. A well balanced diet with grains, fruits, vegetables and meats begins in the high chair and should continue at the family dinner table. The meals may be simple and healthy. Being a short order cook, or providing your child's favorite pizza and fried food on a daily basis, even in a young toddler will have deleterious effects for the rest of their life. Don't let your child become a statistic heading toward lifelong health issues secondary to childhood obesity. Change your own eating habits, improve your children's and remain committed to family meals. We, as parents, cannot afford to raise a generation where obesity is the norm: the change must begin now. That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow. More Information: 1 in 5 Preschoolers Obese

Your Teen

Good Family Relationships Helps Teens Avoid Obesity

1:30

Two of the most valuable resources a teen can have are a stable family and a good relationship with their parents. Adolescents that have these two important components in their lives are more likely to develop healthy habits that may protect them from obesity, according to new study.

"A high level of family dysfunction may interfere with the development of healthful behaviors due to the families' limited ability to develop routines related to eating, sleep or activity behaviors, which can lead to excess weight gain," said the study's lead author, Jess Haines, of the University of Guelph in Ontario.

For the study, the researchers reviewed information on about 3,700 daughters and 2,600 sons, aged 14 to 24, in the United States.

About 80 percent reported having close and stable families. The findings showed that 60 percent of daughters and 50 percent of sons said they had a good relationship with their parents.

Researchers also found that teens with good family relationships are more likely to be more active and get enough sleep. Two factors, in addition to a healthy diet, that contributes to reasonable weight control.

The daughters in these families ate less fast food, and were less likely to be overweight or obese, the researchers discovered.

They also noted that fathers play an important role in helping their sons develop better choices that allow them to maintain a healthy weight.

"Much of the research examining the influence of parents has typically examined only the mother's influence or has combined information across parents," Haines said in a university news release.

"Our results underscore the importance of examining the influence fathers have on their children, and to develop strategies to help fathers support the development of healthy behaviors among their children," she said.

"It appears the father-son parent relationship has a stronger influence on sons than the mother-daughter relationship has on young women," said Haines.

As kids grow into adolescents, a tug of war between independence and parental control often develops. Research has shown that ongoing positive family relationships offer protective influences for teens against a range of risky behaviors. Sometimes it may feel like as our teens mature, family influence begins to wane - but that’s not the reality. This study points out how important a stable home life and good relationships are in helping teens develop a lifetime of healthy habits.

The study was published recently in the International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Story source: Mary Elizabeth Dallas, https://consumer.healthday.com/public-health-information-30/family-health-news-749/parents-play-key-role-in-teens-health-712354.html

Your Child

Helping Children Move to a New Place

2:30

Moving to a new city, state or country can be a real challenge for parents. But as difficult as it may be for adults, for different reasons, it can be harder on the kids.  When a move is in the works, kids may need extra attention to help them adjust to and accept this life-altering change.  After all, this isn’t something children typically have any say in.

Sometimes, parents don’t have a lot of say either. Economic necessity is the number one reason families move. New opportunities or better pay can make the decision for you when finances have been tight or non-existent.

What can you do to help your child cope with the transition? Even if you aren’t happy with the move yourself, try to maintain a positive attitude. During times like these, kids will look to their parents for re-assurance and guidance.

No matter what the circumstances, the most important way to prepare kids for a move is to talk about it.

Try to give them as much information about the move as soon as possible. Answer questions completely and truthfully, and be receptive to both positive and negative reactions. Even if the move means an improvement in family life, kids don't always understand that and may be focused on the frightening aspects of the change.

When you can, involve your child in the house hunting and the search for a new school. The more they feel involved in the process, the less foreign and frightening it becomes.

Exploring the new neighborhood will give your child and you the opportunity to see what’s available. Is there a park nearby? A mall? An interesting outdoor venue? Are there community sports or arts programs for kids? A public or community pool? Checking out the neighborhood can give everyone a sense of wanting to belong before the move is actually made.

For distant moves, provide as much information as you can about the new home, city, and state (or country). Access the Internet to learn about the community. Learn where kids can participate in favorite activities. See if a relative, friend, or even a real estate agent can take pictures of the new house and new school for your child.

Children who haven’t started school may be the easiest to move. Your guidance is still important. Here are some transition tips for moving with toddlers and preschoolers:

•       Keep explanations clear and simple.

•       Use a story to explain the move, or use toy trucks and furniture to act it out.

•       When you pack your toddler's toys in boxes, make sure to explain that you aren't throwing them away.

•       If your new home is nearby and vacant, go there to visit before the move and take a few toys over each time.

•       Hold off on getting rid of your child's old bedroom furniture, which may provide a sense of comfort in the new house. It might even be a good idea to arrange furniture in a similar way in the new bedroom.

•       Avoid making other big changes during the move, like toilet training or advancing a toddler to a bed from a crib.

•       Arrange for your toddler or preschooler to stay with a babysitter on moving day.

Children in elementary school may be somewhat open to a move, although leaving their friends will be difficult for them to accept. 

There are two schools of thought about "the right time to move." Some experts say that summer is the best time because it avoids disrupting the school year. Others say that midyear is better because a child can meet other kids right away.

Sometimes the choice is made for you when your job demands a sudden move or there is a family emergency or occurrence that requires relocation. Either way, kids already in school are going to need some help adjusting.

For some children, particularly those who may have experienced academic failure or been rejected by classmates at their old school, the opportunity for a new beginning is an exciting prospect. It gives them a chance to be accepted in a new setting and to make friends free of their former reputations and self-images. If this is the case, talk about and plan what you and your child will do differently in your new community. Be cautious, however, of unreasonable expectations that a move will make things wonderful. Children take their likes and dislikes and personal strengths and weaknesses with them.

It’s important to let your child express his or her emotions about the big changes in their life. Acknowledge their sadness about leaving behind friends and familiar places. Let them know you are sympathetic and that you understand that he or she might feel nervous about what awaits them, whether it is the new people, the new school or the new bus ride. At the same time, tell her your child you will try to make the move as easy as possible for the entire family, and emphasize some of the positive aspects of living in a new place.

This is an opportunity for your family to live in and learn about a new city, perhaps even a new country, and its people. He or she may be exposed to new cultural traditions and interesting and different ways of life. It also is a chance to meet new people and make new friends. Explain how the family can benefit from the move.

A move is probably hardest on teenagers. Your teen has probably invested considerable energy in a particular social group and might be involved in a romantic relationship. A move may mean that your teen will miss a long-awaited event, like a prom.

It's particularly important to let teens know that you want to hear their concerns and that you respect them. While blanket assurances may sound dismissive, it's legitimate to suggest that the move can serve as rehearsal for future changes, like college or a new job. However, also be sure to let them know that you hear their concerns.

Before the move, you may want to consider having a going-away party. It’s good for everyone to have the opportunity to say goodbye and spend time with long cherished friends and family members. Once a move is made, help your children keep in touch with their old friends. When possible, consider planning a visit back to the old neighborhood.

If your child seems to be having a particularly difficult time adjusting to their new school and surroundings, consider finding a family counselor that can help everyone get objective and third-party guidance during the adjustment phase.

Eventually you and your children will make new friends, find new interests and the new place will begin to feel like home again.

Souces: http://kidshealth.org/parent/positive/talk/move.html#

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/family-life/family-dynamics/Pages/Helping-Children-Adjust-to-a-Move.aspx

Your Teen

What do Energy Drinks Actually Do to the Body?

2:00

There’s been a lot of discussion over whether caffeine-spiked “Energy Drinks” are really safe for consumption, particularly for kids and young adults.  Although many manufacturers add the advisory statement “not recommended for children, pregnant or nursing women and persons sensitive to caffeine” on their label, it often goes ignored.

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration reports that as these drinks have become more popular, the incidences of caffeine related overdoses and deaths have increased.

In one heartbreaking example, 14-year-old Anais Fournier died from cardiac arrest due to caffeine toxicity after consuming two 24- ounce cans of Monster energy drink a day apart.

While the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been investigating whether there is causal link to the drinks and health problems, Mayo Clinic researcher Anna Svatikova and her colleagues wanted more information about exactly what happens in your body after you consume one of the drinks.

She and her team recruited 25 volunteers. All were young adults age 18 or older, nonsmokers, free of known disease, and not taking medications. They were asked to drink a 16-ounce can of a Rockstar energy drink and a placebo -- with the same taste, texture, color and nutritional contents but without the caffeine and other stimulants -- within five minutes on two separate days.

The energy drink had the following stimulants: 240 mg of caffeine, 2,000 mg of taurine and extracts of guarana seed, ginseng root and milk thistle. All typical ingredients associated with energy drinks.

Researchers took numerous measurements first before they drank and 30 minutes after. With the placebo, there was very little change. With the energy drink, however, many of the changes were marked:

•       Systolic blood pressure (the top number) - 6.2 percent increase

•       Diastolic blood pressure (the bottom number) - 6.8 percent increase

•       Average blood pressure - 6.4 percent increase

•       Heart rate - none

•       Caffeine in blood - increase from undetectable to 3.4 micrograms/mL

•       Norepinephrine level (the stress hormone, which can give you the shakes when you have too much caffeine) in blood - increase from 150 pg/mL to 250 pg/ML

Writing in JAMA, the researchers said that these changes may predispose those who drink a single drink to increased cardiovascular risk.

This may explain why a number of those who died after consuming energy drinks appeared to have had heart attacks.

They also exposed the volunteers to two-minute physical, mental, and cold stressors after consuming the energy drinks to see how that might affect blood pressure and other body functions.

The physical stressor involved asking participants to squeeze on a handgrip; the mental one to complete a series of mathematical tasks as fast as possible; and the cold one immersing their one hand into ice water. Interestingly, there was no further change.

Another thing that is typically overlooked when people choose one of these drinks is the serving size. A 16-ounce can is two servings. A 24-ounce can has three servings. Caffeine and sugar content is often listed per serving. But honestly, how many people drink a third or half a can at a time? Besides caffeine, other stimulants are often added to energy drinks such as Ginseng and Guarana. Most people have no idea what they are, what they do and if they negatively interact with medications.

The American Beverage Association defends the drinks and said in a statement  that "there is nothing unique about the caffeine in mainstream energy drinks, which is about half that of a similar sized cup of coffeehouse coffee" and that drinking coffee would have produced similar effects.

“The safety of energy drinks has been established by scientific research as well as regulatory agencies around the globe. Just this year the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) confirmed the safety of energy drinks and their ingredients after an extensive review," the organization said.

It’s up to parents to decide whether these drinks are beneficial to their family or if they should re-think purchasing one for themselves or their child. A family discussion about the pros and cons of energy drinks with pre-teens and teenagers could give the kids the information they need to make a good choice.

Source: Ariana Eunjung Cha, http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleID=2469194

Daily Dose

Happy New Year!

1:30 to read

Happy New Year!!  So here we go again with the New Years resolutions and the “to do” list.  I  try to figure out something each year that I am going to “resolve” to do….one of which continues to be to learn how to play bridge. Somehow I have had the same resolution for two years and yet I still cannot play…at least well. I start off with a bang and just as I can “kind of sort of” play a real game, I somehow get too busy to play and here we go again…back to beginner. I need a new plan!

 

I was having dinner with my “adult children” and they were talking about their New Yea'rs resolutions and it seems they have “categories” of resolutions. In other words they have several different resolutions…which they called personal, professional, social etc. Their thought is that they are more likely to succeed if they have more than one goal??  Maybe they are correct? New approach?

 

So…with that being said let’s think about several different areas that might be good for family resolutions. 

 

Family meals:  We all vowed to try to eat out less and cook at home more often. Not only is it less expensive, it is often healthier and an important time for families to come together to discuss their day. Whether your child is 2 ,10, or 20 yrs old,  just eating together as a family has been shown to improve moods, behavior, school performance and yes, reduces obesity.

 

Electronic media:  As I am on the computer typing I am reminded about how often we all have our faces engrossed in a screen. Some of my young patients know how to “Swipe” and “Refresh” before they can even walk!!  As the world becomes more electronic we are are becoming more isolated…and this is especially true of children. Making a family commitment to limit screen time for all ages may be difficult but is important for building language, social skills and even better sleep. Texting is not talking…who needs a study to confirm that?

 

Exercise: Who doesn’t vow to get more exercise every year…well maybe not young children who long to go outdoors regardless of the weather. But for everyone else, we are becoming more and more sedentary and that is probably somewhat related to the above issue (electronic media).  Make a family plan to exercise at least 3 -4 days a week, maybe after family dinner? Walking, bike riding  (helmet please), playing soccer in the yard, shooting hoops together, or even playing tag, make it easy. Getting our children to move continues to be important for overall health.   They will sleep better, snack less and exercise also gets those good endorphins flowing.  If you keep it up you actually do “feel better”. 

 

Smoking: If you are a parent that smokes…. resolve to “give it up for your children”.  Second hand smoke is REAL, and more and more data shows how it may contribute to SIDS, asthma and other lung problems in children. Model behavior you want to see in your children.  Teen smoking continues to be an issue and many teens are experimenting with electronic cigarettes which then often lead to smoking at a later age. Giving up smoking saves a lot of money towards a fun trip or night out!!

 

OK - let me know how your family does after a few months!! I am hopeful to stay on track for all of 2017. Happy Healthy New Year!!

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