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Daily Dose

How to Treat Croup

1.15 to read

Now that the weather seems to change daily, croup season is here. Have you heard the sounds of raspy, throaty voices in your house lately? This "noise" is ushering in croup season! Croup is an infection that causes swelling of the larynx (vocal box) and trachea (windpipe) that in turn makes the airway just beneath the vocal cords become swollen and narrow. When you have swelling and narrowing of the airway breathing becomes more difficult and noisy and the sound that is made, almost like that of a seal barking, is called being “croupy”. Croup is quite common in young children, but the sound the emanates from that child when they cough, can be scary and concerning for both parent and child. Children are most likely to get croup between the ages of six months and three years. As a child gets older croup is not as common as the trachea gets larger with age and therefore the swelling does not cause as much compromise. When you awaken in the middle of the night to hear your child “barking” in the next room you need to know what to do. Most croup is caused by a common virus, so croup is not treated with antibiotics. The mainstay for the treatment of croup is try and calm you child, as they may be scared both from the tight feeling in their chest, as well as the sound that is made when they are breathing and coughing. The best treatment for croup seems to be taking your child into the bathroom and turning the shower on hot. Let the steam from the hot water fill the room and sit in there and read a book or two to your child. Typically within five to 10 minutes (before the hot water runs out) the moist hot air should help your child’s breathing. They may still have the barking, croupy cough, but they should be more comfortable and will not look like they are having trouble breathing. If the moist steam does not work, and it is a cool fall night, go outside. That is right, taking your “croupy” child from the moist heat in the bathroom, outside to cool night air may also help open their airways. If your child is showing signs of respiratory distress, with color change with coughing (turning blue while coughing, red is always good), is retracting (using their chest muscles between the ribs to help them breath), is grunting with each breath, or seems quite anxious and having trouble breathing you should call for emergency help. If a child is having real difficulty breathing they may be admitted to the hospital to have supplemental oxygen or breathing treatments. Steroids have also been helpful when used for the correct patient population. Steroids may be used in both an outpatient and inpatient setting. Steroids help to reduce inflammation in the trachea and the symptoms lessen over several days. Steroids used in a short burst are not harmful to your child, and are indicated in a child who may have mild respiratory distress due their croup symptoms. Your child may have symptoms of croup for several days, and for some reason they always seem to be worse at night. Put your child to bed with a cool mist humidifier in their room for the next several nights, this will also help to provide moisture to their airway. It is not uncommon for some children to seem more “prone to croup” and may get it recurrently all fall and winter. Have the humidifier handy and in working order! That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

No Need for Stitches?

1.45 to read

OUCH!! This week, I was heading out to grab some lunch when a patient of mine, who happens to have 3 young sons (brings back memories) walked in with her youngest son who had been jumping on the bed and bumped his head!

As you can see by the picture, there was a nice little laceration right in the middle of his forehead. This was the perfect wound that would have previously required a stitch or two, but can now be closed with a liquid adhesive called Dermabond.

Fortunately, this experienced mother of 3 boys had already become a fan of Dermabond and instead of going to the ER; she came by the office for a fairly easy procedure to close the wound.  Smart Mom!

When Dermabond was released in the early 2000’s it took me awhile to get used to how easy this made wound closure.  Dermabond is a liquid skin adhesive that holds wound edges together. The best thing is that it is painless and can be used on small superficial lacerations. Even for a wiggly toddler in most cases the laceration can be closed even while the parent is holding a child still. This is certainly not the case when having to suture!

Dermabond forms a polymer which causes adhesion of the wound edges so it is perfect for “clean, straight, small” lacerations that I often see among my patients.  The classic ones are on the edge of the eye, the chin, the forehead or even the scalp. In studies the cosmetic outcome was comparable to suturing, and in my opinion for those small lacerations it is preferable.

So, we cleaned the wound up, laid him right down (he was perfectly still too) and within 5 minutes the head wound was closed and a happy 2 year waltzed out of the office. Not a tear to be found, but I did have a little residual glue on my finger!

The Dermabond will wear off on its own in 5 – 10 days. Once the adhesive comes off I always remind parents to use sunscreen on the area, which also helps to prevent scarring.

Happily this little guy left while singing “Dr. Sue said, no more little boys jumping on the bed!”

That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Chubby Toddlers & Weight Gain

1:30 to read

So, what goes on behind closed doors? During a child’s check up, I spend time showing parents (as well as older children) their child’s growth curve. This curve looks at a child’s weight and height, and for children 2 and older, their body mass index (BMI). This visual look at how their child is growing is always eagerly anticipated by parents as they can compare their own child to norms by age, otherwise called a cohort. 

I often then use the growth curve as a segue into the discussion about weight trends and a healthy weight for their child. I really like to start this conversation after the 1 year check up when a child has  stopped bottle feeding and now getting regular meals adn enjying table food. 

This discussion becomes especially important during the toddler years as there is growing data that rapid weight gain trends, in even this age group, may be associated with future obesity and morbidity. Discussions about improving eating habits and making dietary and activity recommendations needs to begin sooner rather than later. 

I found an article in this month’s journal of Archives of Pediatrics especially interesting as it relates to this subject.  A study out of the University of Maryland looked at the parental perception of a toddler’s (12-32 months) weight. The authors report that 87% of mothers of overweight toddlers were less likely to be accurate in their weight perceptions that were mothers of healthy weight toddlers. 

They also reported that 82% of the mothers of overweight toddlers were satisfied with their toddler’s body weight. Interestingly this same article pointed out that 4% of mothers of overweight children and 21% of mothers of healthy weight children wished that their children were larger. 

Part of this misconception may be related to the fact that being overweight is becoming normal.  That seems like a sad statement about our society in general. 

Further research has revealed that more than 75% of parents of overweight children report that “they had never heard that their children were overweight” and the rates are even higher for younger children. If this is the case, we as pediatricians need to be doing a better job.  

We need to begin counseling parents (and their children when age appropriate) about diet and activity even for toddlers. By doing this across all cultures we may be able to change perceptions of healthy weight in our youngest children in hopes that the pendulum of increasing obesity in this country may swing the other way. 

That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Kids Who Snore

1.30 to read

Does your child snore?  If so, have you discussed their snoring with your pediatrician.  A recent study published in Pediatrics supported the routine screening and tracking of snoring among preschoolers.  Pediatricians should routinely be inquiring about your child’s sleep habits, as well as any snoring that occurs on a regular basis, during your child’s routine visits.  

Snoring may be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea and/or sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and habitual snoring has been associated with both learning and behavioral problems in older children. But this study was the first to look at preschool children between the ages of 2-3 years.

The study looked at 249 children from birth until 3 years of age, and parents were asked report how often their child snored on a weekly basis at both 2 and 3 years of age.  Persistent snorers were defined as those children who snored more than 2x/week at both ages 2 and 3.  Persistent loud snoring occurred in 9% of the children who were studied.

The study then looked at behavior and as had been expected persistent snorers had significantly worse overall behavioral scores.  This was noted as hyperactivity, depression and attentional difficulties.  Motor development did not seem to be impacted by snoring.

So, intermittent snoring is  common in the 2 to 3 year old set and does not seem to be associated with any long term behavioral issues. It is quite common for a young child to snore during an upper respiratory illness as well .  But persistent snoring needs to be evaluated and may need to be treated with the removal of a child’s adenoids and tonsils.

If you are worried about snoring, talk to your doctor. More studies are being done on this subject as well, so stay tuned.

Daily Dose

What Are Breast Buds?

1.15 to read

I received a phone call today from a mother who was worried about the “bump” beneath her 12 year old daughter’s nipple. I do get this phone call quite often and even see mothers and daughters in the office who are concerned about this lump?  First thought is often, “is this breast cancer?”  The answer is a resounding “NO” but rather a breast bud.  While all mothers developed their own breast buds in years past, many have either forgotten or suppressed the memory of early puberty and breast budding.

Breast buds are small lumps the size of a blueberry or marble that “erupt” directly beneath a young girl’s areola and nipple. Most girls experience breast budding somewhere around 10-12 years of age although it may happen a bit sooner or even later. It is one of the early signs of puberty and estrogen effects.

Many girls will complain that the nipple area is sore and tender and that they are lopsided!! It is not unusual for one side to “sprout” before the other. Sometimes one breast will bud and the other is months behind. All of this is normal. 

While a lump in the breast is concerning in women reassure your daughter that this is not breast cancer (happy that they are so aware) but a normal part of body changes that happen to all girls as they enter adolescence.   Breast budding does not mean that their period is around the corner either, and periods usually start at least 2 years after breast budding (often longer).

Breast buds have also been known to come and go, again not to worry. But at some point the budding will actually progress to breast development and the continuing changes of the breast during puberty.

Reassurance is really all you need and if your daughter is self-conscious this is a good time to start them wearing a light camisole of “sports bra.”  

Daily Dose

Do You Have a Happy Spitter?

1.15 to read

New parents often come in concerned about their baby spitting up.  They typically  ask, “does my baby have gastroesophageal reflux (GER)?”.  I reassure them that “spit happens” and it occurs in more than 2/3 of perfectly healthy infants.  Whether you want to call it GER or spit up, it is regurgitation and in most cases it goes away with time. 

GER is defined as “the physiologic passage of gastric contents into the esophagus”, while GERD is “reflux associated with troublesome symptoms or complications”.  GER in infants is typically painless and does not affect growth. We call these babies “happy spitters”.  

For a “happy spitter” parents need to know that spitting gets worse before it gets better and typically lasts for 5-6 months, with the worst spitting occurring around 3-4 months of age.  

The best treatment for benign GER is lifestyle management.  Small things like thickening feedings with either rice or oatmeal cereal will often decrease the volume of spit up ( parents get sick of wearing towels over their shoulders). Thickening feedings does increase the calories a baby receives. There are also formulas available that contain thickening agents if parents prefer trying them that have the same amount of calories as other formulas.  Thickening feeds has been shown to decrease crying time in some irritable infants with GER and also increases sleep time for fussy babies.  It is always worth trying.

While many parents try putting their baby in a car seat to help with reflux and spitting, car seats may actually make the problem worse. Infants have less reflux when in the prone (tummy) position, but remember your baby must NEVER sleep on their TUMMY!

Babies who are spitters may also benefit from smaller more frequent feedings. When a baby is fussy, parents may try to keep feeding their baby and overfeeding may actually make the spitting worse. Just because a baby is crying, does not always mean they are hungry, especially if they have just been fed.  Sucking in and of itself may help reflux, so a pacifier may be the trick and provide non nutritive sucking.

For babies with GERD who are extremely irritable, may refuse feedings and even lose weight further work up and management with pharmacotherapy may be necessary.  Talk to your doctor about options if lifestyle management does not seem to help. 

Daily Dose

Babies & Bow-Legs

1.15 to read

Fact or fiction: if a young baby puts any weight on their legs they'll become bow legged? Dr. Sue weighs in.I’m sure you have noticed, babies like to stand up! With that being said, I still hear parents coming into my office who say, “I am scared to let my baby stand up as my mother (grandmother, father, uncle) tells me that letting a baby put weight on their legs will cause bow-legs!  How is it possible that this myth is still being passed on to the next generation?

If you look at a baby’s legs it is easy to see how they were “folded” so that they fit inside the uterus. Those little legs don’t get “unfolded” until after delivery. A newborn baby’s legs continue to stay bent for awhile and you can easily “re-fold” those legs to see how your baby was positioned in utero. Almost like doing origami. So, how do those little bent legs get straight?  From bearing weight. If you hold a 3-5 month old baby upright they will instinctively put their feet down and bear weight.  A 4 month old likes nothing more than to jump up and down while being held. They will play the “jumping game” until you become exhausted. That little exercise is the beginning of remolding the bones of the leg, while straightening the bones. If you look at most toddlers many do appear bow-legged as the bones have not had long enough to straighten. Over the next several years you will notice that most children no longer appear bow legged. For most children the bow legs have resolved by the age of 5 years. I child’s final gait and shape of their legs is really determined by about the age of 7 years. Next time you hear the adage about bow legs, you can politely correct the myth. Standing up is going to make that baby have straight legs! That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Toddler Constipation

1:30 to read

I get so many questions about toddlers and constipation.  Constipation relates to stool frequency and consistency.  It is important to understand that everyone has different bowel habits and not all children will have a stool every day.  While some children will have several stools a day another may have a stool every 2 -3 days. Both of these scenarios may be normal and not an indicator of problem.  At the same time, stool consistency is important. If your child has  hard, dry, pebble like stools ( rocks rather than softer snakes or blobs ) this may be an indicator of constipation. Everyone will occasionally have a hard stool, but this should not occur consistently. Lastly, it should not be painful to pass the stool. While toddlers may grunt or push, or even start to “hide” to poop, it should not cause real pain.

With all of that being said, it is not uncommon for toddlers to become constipated as they often are also becoming picky eaters. Due to this “phase”,  some young children will drink too much milk in place of eating meals and this may lead to constipation. Your toddler should be drinking somewhere between 12 -18 ounces of milk per day.  Many children also load up on other dairy products like cheese, yogurt and cottage cheese, which while healthy, may also lead to too much dairy intake and contribute to constipation.

Water intake is also important to help prevent constipation. If your child is drinking too much milk, substitute some water as well.  It is a balancing act to make sure your child is getting both milk and water. If necessary I will also put the smallest amount of apple or prune juice in the water. By the age of 1 year, your child should no longer have a bottle as their main source of nutrition is no longer in the liquid form!

Fiber is also important so offer plenty of whole grains and limit the “white foods” that toddlers love (yes, the bread, cereal, pasta). If you always buy whole wheat pasta and whole grain breads your children will never know the difference. Stay away from processed white foods whenever possible.  It is also easy to throw flax seed or bran into muffins or smoothies (disguising fiber). I also sometimes use Metamucil cookies (they are pre made) and may even resort to dot of icing smeared on it and offer it as a cookie for snack, along with a big glass of water.

Fruits and veggies are a must…even if you think your child won’t eat them! Your toddler needs 2 servings of fruits and veggies every day and rotate what you offer them.  You will be surprised at how one day they may refuse something and they next they will eat it. Don’t give up on fruits and veggies,  it may literally take years for your child to eat peas…but if they aren’t offered a food repetitively they will probably never it eat. I know a lot may get thrown to the floor but just clean it up and persevere.  Not only will this help their stools but their long term healthy eating habits as well.

Movement is also important to help keep the bowels healthy and “moving”.  Making sure that your toddler is moving seems crazy, as they are on the go all of the time.  But with an older child make sure they are getting plenty of time for play and exercise outside or in…and not just sitting in front of a screen.

Lastly, for short term issues with constipation it is also okay to try using milk of magnesia (MOM) or even Miralax….but ask your doctor about dosing in toddlers.   

Daily Dose

The Difference Between Cradle Cap And Dandruff

1.15 to read

I recently received a question from a Twitter follower related to cradle cap and dandruff. She wanted to know if there was a difference in the two.

You know there really isn’t as they are both due to seborrheic dermatitis, an inflammatory condition of the skin in which the skin overproduces skin cells and sebum (the skins natural oil). Cradle cap is the term used for the scaly dermatitis seen on the scalp in infants. It is also seen on the eyelids, eyebrows, and behind the ears. It is typically seen after about three months of age and will often resolve on its own by the time a baby is eight to 12 months old. It is usually simply a “cosmetic” problem for a baby as it looks like a yellowish plaque on a baby’s scalp and is often not even noticed by anyone other than the parents. Unlike seborrheic dermatitis in adults, cradle cap typically doesn’t itch. It is thought that cradle cap may occur in infancy due to hormonal influences from the mother that were passed across the placenta to the baby. These hormones cause the sebaceous glands to become over active. In some severe cases an infant’s scalp becomes really scaly and inflamed and causes even more parental concern, as it appears that the infant is uncomfortable and may be trying to scratch their head by rubbing it on surfaces. The treatment for cradle cap is to wash the baby’s scalp daily with a mild shampoo and then to use a soft comb or brush to help remove the scales once they have been loosened with washing. When washing the head make sure to get the shampoo behind the ears and in the brows (keeping the soap out of baby’s eyes). This is usually sufficient treatment for most cradle cap. In situations where the greasy scales seem to be worsening it may help to put a small amount of mineral oil or olive oil on the baby’s head and let it sit (I left a small amount on my children’s heads overnight) and then to shampoo the following day. The oil will help the scales to loosen up and come off more easily. For babies that have very inflamed irritated cradle cap a visit to your pediatrician may be warranted to confirm the diagnosis. In persistent cases I often recommend shampooing several times a week with a dandruff shampoo that has either selenium (Selsun) or zinc pyrithione (Head and Shoulders) making sure not to get any in the infant’s eyes. I may then also use a hydrocortisone cream or foam on the scalp that will lessen the inflammation and itching. In these cases it may take several weeks to totally clear up the problem. As children get older, especially during puberty, you may see a return of seborrhea as dandruff. Again you can use dandruff shampoos. It also seems that with the overproduction of sebum there is an overgrowth of a fungus called “malessizia” so using a shampoo for dandruff as well as a antifungal shampoo (Nizoral) often works. I have teens alternate different shampoos, as sometimes it seems to work better than always using the same shampoo for months on end. Teens don’t like white flakes falling from their scalp and unlike a baby, a teen is worried about the cosmetic issues of seborrhea! That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

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