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Daily Dose

Preschool Nutrition Can Be Challenging

1.30 to read

Does your child eat three meals a day with healthy snacks along the way? I often find myself talking to parents about establishing healthy eating habits especially when you have a preschooler. Preschool children, specifically the two to five-year-old set are notoriously picky eaters, and parents need to recognize that this is developmentally appropriate, although frustrating for parents.

This is an appropriate time to begin teaching children the importance of healthy eating habits to encourage a lifetime of good health and prevent obesity. A good place to start to get information is “MyPyramid for Preschoolers”, a website sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This website not only covers what your children should be eating, but also is full of good advice on handling picky eaters, how to monitor your child’s growth and ideas to encourage physical activity.

The website encourages parents to lead by example and let your children see you eating a wide array of foods including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains throughout the day. There are ideas for healthy snacks that can be eaten on the run, as you get back into carpools and after school activities. Even the toddler set is busy after school!

Remember: do not let food choices become a battle or an issue. Do not make negative food comments around your children, and keep trying new things. It may take up to 20 attempts or more before your child will try something new, but if you don’t keep trying you will never know if they might really like broccoli.

Also, no “yucky faces” for the adults and older children while at the table and eating their meal. That will only discourage your toddler from trying unfamiliar foods. Put on that happy face, even if it is not your favorite food, it might be your child’s.

The most important message is to make mealtime and snack time pleasant and healthy. Even a toddler can help with planning and preparing a meal. This website is really quite good and interactive as you can enter your child’s first name, age, gender and typical amount of activity and the site will generate a plan just for your child! Can’t be easier than that.

That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

 
Daily Dose

Preschool Nutrition Can Be Challenging

1.30 to read

Does your child eat three meals a day with healthy snacks along the way? I often find myself talking to parents about establishing healthy eating habits especially when you have a preschooler. Preschool children, specifically the two to five-year-old set are notoriously picky eaters, and parents need to recognize that this is developmentally appropriate, although frustrating for parents.

This is an appropriate time to begin teaching children the importance of healthy eating habits to encourage a lifetime of good health and prevent obesity. A good place to start to get information is “MyPyramid for Preschoolers”, a website sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. This website not only covers what your children should be eating, but also is full of good advice on handling picky eaters, how to monitor your child’s growth and ideas to encourage physical activity.

The website encourages parents to lead by example and let your children see you eating a wide array of foods including fruits, vegetables, and whole grains throughout the day. There are ideas for healthy snacks that can be eaten on the run, as you get back into carpools and after school activities. Even the toddler set is busy after school!

Remember: do not let food choices become a battle or an issue. Do not make negative food comments around your children, and keep trying new things. It may take up to 20 attempts or more before your child will try something new, but if you don’t keep trying you will never know if they might really like broccoli.

Also, no “yucky faces” for the adults and older children while at the table and eating their meal. That will only discourage your toddler from trying unfamiliar foods. Put on that happy face, even if it is not your favorite food, it might be your child’s.

The most important message is to make mealtime and snack time pleasant and healthy. Even a toddler can help with planning and preparing a meal. This website is really quite good and interactive as you can enter your child’s first name, age, gender and typical amount of activity and the site will generate a plan just for your child! Can’t be easier than that.

That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

 
Daily Dose

Treatment Strategies for Bedwetting

1.15 to read

I receive quite a few emails daily and many have to do with bedwetting. The best way to attack the problem of bedwetting begins when you and your child have had a discussion about their feelings related to bedwetting. This often happens as they get older and continue to have problems with bedwetting and they are anxious or embarrassed. If you bring up the subject and they would rather just wear a pull up at night, and go back to playing outside rather than discuss strategies for staying dry, it is not time to tackle the issue. Timing is everything! As you start to discuss strategies to stop bedwetting, begin with having your child keep a calendar of their dry nights. This gets them involved and gives you an idea of their level of commitment. Then start setting their alarm clock to awake them in the morning and see if they can get up on their own. If the alarm doesn’t wake them up for school it is probably not going to awaken them in the middle of the night. Remind them to recognize their need to go to the bathroom during the day too, and have them go every several hours to feel the sensation of their bladder filling throughout the day. Many of these kids are infrequent voiders during the day and have actually stretched their bladder wall and hypertrophied the bladder muscle. Lastly, make sure that they are not constipated and put them on something like Miralax to ensure that they do not have stool that also compresses the bladder (the colon sits right above the bladder and can push on the bladder). Talk about a reward system that they would like to use while working on the problem. It doesn’t have to be a major reward, small things work equally well. I think the rewards should be given by the week, rather than the day. I also give rewards for effort, not just for dry nights. Trying is the whole idea. Sometimes the brain and bladder are just not ready and you do not want your child to feel defeated even though they have tried their hardest. If all of this is successful it is then time to set up a “bedwetting alarm system” (numerous ones available over the internet). The alarms consist of a bell and pad. The alarm sounds when the pad senses moisture. The alarms that actually buzz are more effective than those that only vibrate. Remember, your child is already hard to arouse and vibration alone will probably not work. Once you begin using the alarm and you hear the alarm go off, you will need to go into their rooms and call their name or shake them too, to actually get them awake and to the bathroom. In the beginning it may almost be like sleep walking them to the bathroom. Then rinse off the pad and reset the alarm and put them back to bed. Over time they should arouse more easily and the time spent awake and going to the bathroom should shorten. As you can see this is disruptive to everyone’s sleep so best done over the summer or a long winter break. It often takes at least a month for bedwetting to stop and the alarm system should really be used for several more months to reinforce the process. There is also a drug call DDAVP that works on the kidneys to reduce the flow of urine. This medication works when given but does not “cure” the problem. I often use this for children who are worried about a camp or overnight experience, before they have started the alarm system regimen. It has not been shown to be as effective as the alarm system, but in difficult cases I have used it in conjunction with the alarm system. You might want to discuss the pros and cons of this drug with your pediatrician. Remember this takes time, motivation and determination on both the parent and child’s part. Remain positive and optimistic throughout the training process. It is not a sprint but a longer race, and don’t expect overnight success. Remind them of their other childhood accomplishments and that with time and determination they will be successful with bedwetting too. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Your Child

Playing With Food May Help Picky Eaters

2:00

If your child is a picky eater, encouraging them to play with their food may help them overcome the reluctance to try new foods according to a new study.

Researchers in the United Kingdom asked a group of 70 children – ages 2 to 5 – to play with mushy, slimy food while their parents observed, watching to see if kids would happily use their hands to search for a toy soldier buried at the bottom of a bowl of mashed potatoes or jelly. Children who wouldn't use their hands were offered a spoon.

Parents and researchers each rated how happy the kids were to get their hands dirty on a scale of one to five, with a higher number indicating more enjoyment. Children could get a total score as high as 20, a tally of the scores from researchers and parents for play with both the mashed potatoes and the jelly.

Researchers also gave parents a questionnaire to assess children's so-called tactile sensitivity, quizzing them about things like whether kids disliked going barefoot in the sand and grass or avoided getting messy.

The study found that kids who liked playing with their food were less likely to have food neophobia (the fear of trying something new) or tactile sensitivity.

"Although this is just an association, the implication is that getting children to play with messy substances may help their food acceptance," lead study author Helen Coulthard, a psychology researcher at De Montfort University in Leicester, U.K., told Reuters Health by email.

Previous research has linked food neophobia to limited fruit and vegetable consumption. Courtland and her team wanted to see if they could establish a link between touching food and tasting unfamiliar foods.

Courtland suggested that parents of picky eaters begin introducing new foods to their child by creating “food art.” Food art is making pictures or images with different foods on a plate.  The first step is letting your child make a picture or design by arranging various colored foods on the plate.  Don’t pressure them to taste their creation, but wait till they are ready to give it a try. Make it a game and eventually begin encouraging them to taste what they have created. Start small and expand to larger food groups and pictures.

Offering as much variety as possible from a young age also helps children experience lots of textures and flavors, which may minimize their fear of unfamiliar foods.

You’re probably going to have to join in on the taste experimentation to show how good these food pictures taste! You might also take a picture of your child with their creation on your phone and then show it to them – to make it a little more fun.

It’s fairly normal for kids to go through a period of refusing to try new foods, though most kids will grow out of this phase by the time they start school. However, there are some children that carry new food aversion on into adulthood. It isn't necessarily harmful as long as the children maintain a healthy weight for their height, pediatricians say.

But over time, neophobia can make it very difficult to enjoy social engagements. Parents that have a hard time trying or enjoying new foods themselves too often pass that trait onto their own children.  Most of the time it’s just a phase that kids go through and finding creative ways to help them work through it eliminates the problem.

Source: Lisa Rapaport, http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/05/19/us-food-fears-children-idUSKBN0O41MD20150519

 

 

 

Daily Dose

Shingles in Childhood?

1:30 to read

Is it possible for children to come down with shingles? I recently saw a 2 year old with a most interesting history who then developed a weird rash.   Funny thing, I read an article shortly after seeing this child that described his case perfectly, only wish I had seen this the week before.

So, this 2 year old complained that his leg hurt. Enough pain that he limped and woke up at night crying that his thigh hurt. He had no history of trauma and also was otherwise well, in other words no fever, vomiting, cold symptoms etc.

After several days of watching him without resolution of his pain the mother noticed 3 little spots on his thigh, which she thought might be a bite. The little boy was seen and the diagnosis of herpes zoster (shingles) was considered.  In children the differential diagnosis of localized leg pain in the absence of a rash would not normally include shingles.

According to the pedi dermatologist (that I consulted) shingles in children occurs more frequently on their lower extremities (not for adults) and may involve the back on the same side.   Unlike adults, most cases of zoster in children are only mildly painful and resolve fairly quickly.

Well, this little boy didn’t read the book and his rash continued to get worse and spread, and was quite painful for days. Prior to this, he was a perfectly healthy little boy and had received his first varicella vaccine when he was 1.  

Since the widespread use of the varicella vaccine (chickenpox vaccine, see old post), the incidence of chickenpox has decreased dramatically, and vaccination should also reduce the risk of developing shingles later in life. In otherwise healthy children shingles (zoster) tends to develop at a younger age among vaccinated children than in those who have had a “natural” chickenpox infection.  When shingles occurs after vaccination it represents either a new infection with wild-type virus (an exposure to chickenpox or shingles) or reactivation of the vaccine virus.

Once a child has received 2 doses of varicella vaccine as recommended, the immunity is “boosted” and should further reduce the risk of developing shingles. Varicella–zoster virus can be transmitted via contact with skin lesions of those who have either chickenpox or shingles.  Infection is less likely after exposure to shingles. Transmission of the virus occurs until all lesions have crusted over. In this case, the little boy was ultimately started on an oral anti-viral therapy with slow resolution of his rash and pain and a return to normal around his house.

Note to self: “weird” pain may precede the rash in herpes zoster by several days.  Even though unusual, herpes zoster may occur in a healthy child who no history of varicella exposure and who has received all or part of their chickenpox vaccine.

That’s your daily dose for today. We’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Anxiety Can Happen At Any Age

It has been a busy week in my office. Many of the questions I've been answering are stress related. Why are we raising a bunch of stressed out kids?It has been a busy few days in my office lately.  I have been answering voice mails, emails, "tweets" and it is interesting to me that most of my messages are related to children with anxiety.

Why are we raising such an anxious group of children? Is it that the "gene pool" has changed or is it just societal? I really think that it is due to our society as a whole, we are on the fast track to creating the next generation of "stressed out" adults, even more so than ever, if that is even possible!! I will just walk you through my voice mails, as it really is interesting that my phone messages are from parents with children of all ages. There is the preschooler who won't get dressed in the morning for school due to a constant tummy ache. There is an elementary school child who is having problems sleeping every night, and a tween who is getting tics when she gets anxious at school. I also take care of a large number of college students and I have two patients who left college after their first semester as they were anxious and depressed while being away from home and did not go to class and therefore did not make their grades. In each case the parent is calling to ask what to do? I only wish I had all of the answers!! I will get on that proverbial "soap box" and go out on a limb and say that after practicing pediatrics for 25 years the problems that are related to behaviors in our children are much bigger issues than anything else. We have made great strides in disease prevention, but we are definitely not preventing emotional issues in our children. Being a parent and a child seems to get only more difficult each year. Was that the way it always was? Did our own parents think we were anxious and "stressed out"? I don't even think that was a word in the 60's, 70's or even 80's. Just the same way that everyone now says, "I am busy running errands", (I know I never heard my mother use that term), our kids talk about "stress" from very young ages. Do we as parents put that pressure on them from an early age? I know that my new parents feel "stressed" that their baby does not sleep through the night by two to three weeks, and say "what are we doing wrong?" Answer, nothing, infants are not supposed to sleep through the night at that early age. Don't set the bar so high so early! I have parents of toddlers who worry that their child cannot jump as high as their friend's toddler (I don't even know how high that might be, are their standards for the playground?). I must say it just goes on from there. I know we parents are supposed to worry, but I think that constant worry is creeping right into the skin of very young children and it is "causing" anxious children. Yes, some children are just born that way, but most are not. I am not saying that a little bit of worry cannot be beneficial at times. It is okay to "worry" about doing well in school, or making new friends, or misbehaving and getting punished or eventually how to get into college and "what will I do with the rest of my life". But balancing a little worry with constant anxiety is become more difficult. Most of my referrals are no longer to the orthopedic surgeons for broken bones, but rather to psychologists and psychiatrists to help children and adolescents deal with anxiety. There are even recent articles regarding the fact that there are not enough pediatric psychiatrists to care for the burgeoning needs in the pediatric population. I wish I knew the answers, but I really do think that we can change things, be it ever so slowly. Getting back to the basics of "down" time with family and friends, rather than lessons, tutors, and Kumon math for 3 year olds! How about less time on computers and phones and more time spent face to face talking. How about listening to our children rather than having them watching DVD's on the way to school or while out at dinner with the family. So many little things that we can all change may make a difference. We have to start trying something different, as what I am seeing now is not "the happy go lucky" children of years gone by. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

How To Break The Thumb Sucking Habit

I received an email via our iPhone App from a mom trying to get her son to stop sucking his thumb. The sooner you help your child break this habit, the better. I received an email via our iPhone App (do you have it?) from a mom who is trying to break her son's thumb sucking habit.  She writes "I've been trying to get him to stop for weeks and I'm failing, HELP!"

{C}

Thumb sucking is an innate reflex and can even been seen on sonograms while a baby is still in utero. It is a common means of self-soothing for infants and young children. Most children will spontaneously stop thumb sucking by two to four years of age. But, like any habit, there are those for whom it is harder to stop. In most cases children four and older only suck their thumb (or fingers) when they are tired, bored or anxious.  Very rarely do they suck their thumbs when they are engaged in activities like school, playing on the playground, or on the computer. They are often quite aware of the habit and will not suck in front of their friends, or teachers, but when relaxed at home their thumb goes straight to the mouth. If your child is still sucking their thumb after the age of four, it may be time to sit down with them to discuss strategies to stop their thumb sucking. Talk about germs (especially during cold and flu season) and come up with some sort of system to remind them when they are sucking and also to reward them for not sucking their thumb. Make fun sticker charts, and have a goal for number of days without sucking when the reward becomes even bigger. You know what motivates your child the most, a new book, or toy or trip to get ice cream. Do not punish your child for sucking and praise them for all of their hard work. Habits are hard to break! Many times thumb sucking may be curtailed by applying one of the over-the-counter products (Mavala Stop, or Orally No Bite), which are harmless liquids that taste badly. Unfortunately, many kids will get used to the unpleasant taste and continue to suck. Same goes for nail biters (I have not been successful in my own home in this area). Many children will stop their daytime sucking but continue the nighttime habit. In this case you may also try using a glove or a thumb sucking apparatus that covers the thumb and even attaches to their pajama top to keep their thumb out of their mouths. Again, you need to have a motivated child to do this or it will not work. Lastly, discuss this subject with your pediatric dentist. Sometimes, just having them discuss thumb sucking with your child will be enough to get a child to stop the habit. Power of positive thinking! One final note:  There are expensive orthodontic appliances that may be used for older children that continue to have thumb sucking problems after their permanent teeth are erupting. Persistent sucking can lead to problems with a child’s bite and jaw formation and should be addressed by the dentist and or orthodontist. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue right now!

Your Teen

Headlines: Another Teen Suicide

On September 6, 2007, the Centers for Disease and Prevention reported suicide rates in American adolescents (especially girls, 10 to 24 years old) increased 8%, the largest increase in 15 years.The sad and desperate story of a college student who killed himself after a roommate secretly videotaped him having sex, and streamed it live on the web has made headlines across the world.

18 year old, Tyler Clementi, was embarrassed and humiliated by the invasion of his privacy. He jumped to his death from the George Washington Bridge. Unfortunately, Tyler is not the only teen who thinks suicide is the only way to end his suffering. On September 6, 2007, the Centers for Disease and Prevention reported suicide rates in American adolescents (especially girls, 10 to 24 years old) increased 8%, the largest increase in 15 years. Amazingly, suicide is the third leading cause of death for 15-to-24-year-olds, and the sixth leading cause of death for 5-to-14-year-olds. The current headlines demonstrate that it is more important than ever that parents are aware of the symptoms of depression and substance abuse.  Suicides increase substantially when the two are combined. What symptoms should I look for? - Change in eating and sleeping habits - Withdrawal from friends, family, and regular activities. - Violent, rebellious behavior, or running away - Drug and alcohol use. - Unusual neglect of personal appearance - Marked personality change - Persistent boredom, difficulty concentrating, or a decline in the quality of     schoolwork - Frequent complaints about physical symptoms, often related to emotions, such as stomachaches, headaches, fatigue, etc. - Loss of interest in pleasurable activities. - Not tolerating praise or rewards. A teenager who is planning to commit suicide may also: - Complain of being a bad person or feeling rotten inside. - Give verbal hints with statements such as: “I won't be a problem for you much longer,”    “ Nothing matters,” “It's no use, and I won't see you again.” - Put his or her affairs in order, for example, give away favorite possessions, clean his or her room, throw away important belongings, etc. - Become suddenly cheerful after a period of depression - Have signs of psychosis (hallucinations or bizarre thoughts.) What should you do if you notice these symptoms in your child? If a child or adolescent says, "I want to kill myself," or "I'm going to commit suicide,"  always take the statement seriously and immediately seek assistance from a qualified mental health professional. People often feel uncomfortable talking about death. However, asking the child or adolescent whether he or she is depressed or thinking about suicide can be helpful. Rather than putting thoughts in the child's head, such a question will provide assurance that somebody cares and will give the young person the chance to talk about problems. If one or more of these signs occurs, parents need to talk to their child about their concerns and seek professional help from a physician or a qualified mental health professional. With support from family and appropriate treatment, children and teenagers who are suicidal can heal and return to a healthier mental outlook.

Daily Dose

The Need to Stay Calm During Swine Flu Season

I have found myself sounding like a broken record for the past week, and feel certain that the record is going to continue to “skip” as the confusion over the use of antiviral for H1N1 (swine flu) continues.

In the last week I have not only been to the office, but also to a school board meeting and several social engagements after work, all which were opportunities to discuss the continued H1N1 outbreaks and anxiety associated with “swine flu”. I guess the good thing is that no one is discussing the economy; it is all chatter about flu. It is important to reiterate that H1N1 is another flu, really no different than seasonal flu which we experience every year in the U.S. The difference is that this is a new or novel flu virus and it has managed to spread, quite effectively, throughout the spring and summer months, and into the early fall, with a clear predilection for school aged children. With that being said, now that schools are back in session and our children are all together in close quarters, we are seeing an increase in H1N1 activity throughout the country. Because of the previous concerns about swine flu last spring and the uncertainty of how the population as a whole would handle this virus, there has been a great deal of anxiety associated with this particular virus. Fortunately, over the last five months, the data is showing that H1N1 has not caused more pediatric deaths than we see each year with seasonal influenza (which is still yet to come this winter). The MAJORITY of children with this virus are doing well, and are recovering within two to seven days, even without the routine use of antivirals like Tamiflu and Relenza. The CDC has reiterated that routine testing for influenza and use of antivirals is not necessary for the school aged child, without underlying chronic illness, who is not seriously ill. That is most of our children. Younger children, under the age of five, and especially under the age of two, needs to be evaluated and may or may not need antiviral treatment. That is a decision for their pediatrician to make. Despite these ongoing recommendations parents are frantically calling the office requesting that antivirals, like Tamiflu, be prescribed for their family, “in case” they are exposed to flu, get sick, feel like they might get sick, or as one mother actually said, “I’ll feel better if my son is just on Tamiflu all winter.” This is not going to help anyone. The exposures are going to continue throughout the winter. Not just at schools, but also at the grocery store, cleaners, church, after school events and the list is endless. We need to try and keep a level head and not horde a medication that others may truly need, or spend unnecessary valuable health care dollars on medicine that will be thrown out in a year, or have people start and stop Tamiflu and Relenza as they feel better. Just like antibiotics, overuse and indiscriminate use of antiviral medication will lead to resistant influenza strains. When we really need these drugs, we all want them to work, for our children, for ourselves and for all of those that may get seriously ill throughout this flu season. This “swine flu frenzy” is reminiscent of the hording of Cipro during the anthrax scare. I wonder how much Cipro was hidden away, “just in case you opened your mail and found a white powder.” As I recall, there were shortages of Cipro for months, and the same might happen with antiviral medications. It is easy to write prescriptions, but it is much harder to do the right thing and try and teach patients and families why doctors are not routinely prescribing antiviral medications. If things change and recommendations change doctors will let you know, but in the meantime, keep sick children home until they are fever free, read the information about those who might need to take an antiviral medication and keep washing hands. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again soon.

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