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Good News! More Infants Placed in Car Seats Correctly

2:00

More parents and caregivers are getting the message and placing their infants and toddlers in car safety seats correctly, according to new research.

For years, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has aggressively urged parents and caregivers to put their children in rear-facing car seats until they are at least two years old. The AAP’s education policy seems to be paying off.

The study found that infants placed in rear-facing car seats increased from 84% in 2009 to 91% in 2015. The percentage of toddlers aged 12-17 months being placed in rear-facing car seats also increased dramatically from 12% to 61% during the same time period.

"This study shows that child passenger safety education has been a success in making sure young children are positioned correctly in the car, but there is still room for improvement," Dr. Joseph O'Neil, medical director of the Automotive Safety Program at Riley Hospital for Children, Indiana University Health, said in a press release.

The researchers also found that the use of booster-seat use decreased from 72% to 65% for older kids from 4 to 7 years old during that time.

The study findings suggest educational programs to improve child passenger safety could focus on the gaps identified by the study, including the recommendation to keep children rear-facing in safety seats through age 24 months, to use booster seats through age 8, and the recommendation that children sit in the back seat through age 13.

Safercar.org has a video and step-by-step instructions on how to properly install a rear-facing car seat for baby’s safety.

AAP also offers “Tips for Parents,” in video and written media, for shopping for car seats.

The study will be presented today at the AAP’s National Conference & Exhibition in Chicago.

This research is good news for children! Proper use of rear –facing car seats and booster seats are the first line of defense in keeping children safer when they’re riding in your car.

Story source: Amy Wallace, https://www.upi.com/Health_News/2017/09/14/Study-shows-more-infants-toddlers-placed-in-car-seats-correctly/9381505417976/

Parenting

Recall: More Than 500,000 Diono Children’s Car Seats

1:45

Diono has announced that it is recalling more than 500,000 car seats after concerns that they may not adequately protect children in a crash. The recall covers the following models: Radian R100, Radian R120, Radian RXT, Olympia, Pacifica and Rainier convertible and booster seats. The car seats were made from as early as January 2014 to September 2017 by Diono, which used to be called Sunshine Kids Juvenile.

The U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says that when the seats are secured using a lap belt without the top tether, children over 65 pounds have an increased risk of chest injury in a crash.

Diono, based in Sumner, Washington, says it has no reports of injuries and that few children who weigh more than 65 pounds will be harnessed into the seats. The problem was discovered in company testing. The company will send owners a kit with an energy absorbing pad and a new chest clip at no cost. The recall is expected to start November 22. Customers with questions can call Diono at (855) 463-4666.

Consumers can also click on https://us.diono.com/safety-notice/ for more information.

To ensure that your child is using the car seat safest for them Rachel Rothman, Chief Technologist in the Good Housekeeping Institute, recommends taking the following precautions:

  • Buy a car seat that is age and size appropriate. Resist the urge to deviate from this so you can better see your child or for other reasons.
  • Make sure that when installing a car seat the latch straps or seatbelt straps are not twisted.
  • A properly installed car seat should not move more than one inch from side to side and front to back.
  • Read the car seat instruction manual as well as the vehicle owner manual for proper installation instructions.
  • Check the return policy on your car seat before you make a purchase in case you buy the wrong size and need to replace it.
  • Delay switching to front-facing car seats as late as possible to ensure safety. Before you make the switch, make sure your child truly has outgrown their current seat.

Story source: http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/travel-products/car-seat-reviews/news/a46498/diono-car-seat-recall/

https://us.diono.com/safety-notice/

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