Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Daily Dose

RSV Season is Here

Boy oh boy, RSV is really here and so more thoughts on that topic. The office is just full of coughing and wheezing kids of all ages, much of which is RSV.Boy oh boy, RSV is really here. The office is just full of coughing and wheezing kids of all ages, much of which is RSV.

But the ones I am really concerned about are the infants and babies under the age of one year. They have a harder time with the virus and this infant age group is the group that statistically gets hospitalized more often. The buzz among moms about RSV continues (but at least less buzz about vaccines). They are all concerned and confused about when they need to come and see the pediatrician and also what “they” as parents need to watch for. Both of these concerns are important. As we talked about before, almost all children get RSV by one year of age. In most cases it will just be a bad cold, but in some babies they will develop bronchiolitis (or airway inflammation of the lower respiratory tract) and they have a classic, frequent, non-productive cough, lots of secretions and often have a wheeze when listened to with the stethoscope. In most cases these babies are fairly “pathetic” and cough and awaken throughout the night, may not eat quite as well, and just feel “puny” and require a lot of parental care and TLC. Babies and therefore their parents don’t get a lot of sleep when RSV is around. The babies I worry about are those that have true difficulty breathing. They not only cough frequently, they have signs of increased work of breathing which is evident by “pulling or retracting” while breathing. When you take off their shirts (which is what you should do at home too to look at how they breath), you see their ribs pulling or their abdomens working to help them breath. They look uncomfortable, not just while coughing, but also while just trying to get a breath. If this gets worse they may even grunt with each breath. I also worry about the baby that coughs and coughs and has “duskiness” with their cough. Most parents report that their baby gets bright red with cough, and eyes water and they may even vomit with cough. But a baby that turns even A LITTLE dusky needs to be seen immediately. Remember, red is good, blue is bad! Unfortunately RSV is here for a while. This is the peak season in most of the country and will be for weeks. Keep those young babies away from others and if your baby develops cold symptoms, look at how they breathe. If in doubt, take them in. That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow.

Your Teen

Half of American Teens Breathe Secondhand Smoke


We’ve come a long way in this country in regards to making public places free of cigarette smoke, but people in their home or car can smoke as much as they like- and that’s their right to do so. When there are children in those homes and cars – they’re inhaling secondhand smoke and that can have a major impact on their physical wellbeing.

Secondhand smoke is the smoke a smoker breathes out and that comes from the tip of burning cigarettes, pipes, and cigars. It contains about 4,000 chemicals. Many of these chemicals are dangerous; more than 50 are known to cause cancer. Anytime children breathe in secondhand smoke they are exposed to these chemicals. 

Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Office of Smoking and Health examined data from more than 18,000 middle school and high school students; researchers found that 48 percent reported exposure to secondhand smoke in 2013. Additionally, secondhand smoke exposure was reportedly nine times higher among never-smoking teens with no smoke-free rules in their home and car, compared to those with 100 percent smoke-free rules.

"The findings weren't really a surprise as much as a call for public health action," said study author Brian King, deputy director. "The continuing research [on secondhand smoke] really helps us put a finger on who's exposed and in what location," he said.

According to the study, secondhand smoke exposure is known to contribute to several health problems in children, including respiratory symptoms, impaired lung function, middle ear disease and sudden infant death syndrome.

Analyzing questionnaire responses from students in grades 6 through 12 in 2013, King and his colleagues found that 16 percent were exposed to secondhand smoke at home and 15 percent in a vehicle. Additionally, 17 percent reported secondhand smoke exposure at school, 27 percent of those who were old enough to have a job, at work and 35 percent in indoor and outdoor public areas.

"We did assess the extent of exposure based on whether youth were [protected] by smoke-free policies, and it's no surprise that those covered by policies had lower exposure," King said.

Regarding home and car exposure, "I think it really comes down to individual families to take that action," he added.

Dr. Normal Edelman, senior scientific advisor for the American Lung Association, called the research "very useful." He noted that comprehensive public no-smoking policies have helped lower U.S. smoking rates by helping some smokers break the habit.

"We've made great strides in protecting adults from secondhand smoke ... and the health effects have been dramatic," Edelman said. "So now it's time to protect kids from secondhand smoke, and this [study] shows that many of our kids are exposed to at least some secondhand smoke. Clearly, if they live with smokers, they're exposed to a lot, and I think those kids are most at risk."

On a personal note, my mother smoked from the time I was born to after I left home. In those bygone days, most people were not aware of the dangers of smoking and cigarette ads even promoted the “health benefits” from taking a long drag off a cigarette.

Unfortunately for me, the heath benefits were nil. I had bronchitis 2 or 3 times a year and ear infections when I was little. I developed asthma, as I got older.  No one ever made the connection between the constant cigarette smoke in the house and car and my illnesses. I was just considered a rather “sickly child.” Eventually, my mother developed COPD.

Believe me when I say secondhand smoke can become a real health problem for children.

While 26 U.S. states and the District of Columbia have implemented comprehensive smoke-free laws prohibiting smoking in all indoor public places and work sites -- including restaurants and bars -- several states have no statewide laws addressing secondhand smoke in public areas, and others have less stringent restrictions.

Source: Maureen Salamon,

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.



Are antibiotics being overprescribed?

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.


Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.