Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Daily Dose

New Sleep Guidelines for Your Baby

1:30 to read

I am sure that many of you heard about the latest recommendations on infant sleep that the American Academy of Pediatrics has released. The latest policy statement from the AAP recommends that all infants sleep in their parents room, but not in the parents bed,  for at least the first 6 months of life and preferably for the first year!!  This is big news and quite a change from the previous sleep recommendations which were published in 2011.

 

All of the latest recommendations regarding sleep are intended to help to reduce the incidence of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome), which is the leading cause of death for children under the age of 1 year. SIDS in one of the greatest fears of all parents. While “the back to sleep” campaign has reduced the incidence of SIDS, there are still over 3,500 babies in the U.S. who die suddenly and unexpectedly every year while sleeping. (this includes some from suffocation and strangulation and not SIDS).

 

In addition, the recommendations re-iterate that the baby should not co-sleep with their parents, but should be in a crib or bassinet with a firm sleep surface, in the parents’ room. These new recommendations, may be driven by the reality that breast feeding mothers are exhausted and often fall asleep while nursing their baby. If the mother is sitting in a chair or on the couch and falls asleep the baby may be at risk of suffocation if they roll into a cushion or fall down between pillows. If the mother is in bed breast feeding and accidentally falls asleep at least the baby is on a firm surface - make sure when you do breast feed your baby in bed to remove all loose blankets and pillows in the area around your baby prior to feeding - just in case.

 

Although it has been a long ago, I always put our infants in their own cribs to sleep -  you might say I was obsessed. One night, shortly after the birth of our 3rd child I found myself on my hands and knees looking under the bed. When my husband was awakened and asked me “what are you doing?” I replied…”looking for the baby!” He then reminded me that I had put the baby in his crib in the nursery right after I had finished breastfeeding him.  I truly had no memory and thought he had fallen under our bed!! This, from someone who had previously stayed up for 36 hours during residency working in the hospital and thought I could handle sleep deprivation- clearly not true!! I just remember the feeling of being frantic! 

 

The AAP continues to recommend that the crib be essentially bare - in other words, no bumpers, no blankets, no stuffed toys, just the fitted crib sheet. The baby should always be placed on their back to sleep…once your baby learns to roll from back to front ( which typically happens after they have learned to roll tummy to back), they may be left to sleep on their tummy. Even with a baby in your room you cannot get up all night to keep trying to keep them from rolling over!  

 

The AAP does recommend using a pacifier for sleep times ( I am a huge pacifier fan as you know). The only problem with a pacifier is convincing The Parents that it is time to “get rid of the paci” once their baby is over a year old….. sometimes hard to sell that concept.

 

Lastly, the APP reiterated that they do not support the use of any of the devices sold to new parents to help “prevent”  SIDS. In other words, all of the technology being marketed including  “anti-SIDS mattresses, home cardiorespiratory monitors, and even fancy video monitors.  While many a well intentioned parent will invest a lot of unnecessary money and time trying to make the baby safe during sleep, the mantra “less is more” is now the best way to ensure safe sleep for your baby. I remind parents that there will be plenty of ways to spend that money  - start the college savings!

 

 

 

 

Daily Dose

Are Parents Too Connected?

1.30 to read

Has your spouse, babysitter or other child care provider ever called you to come home “because the baby is crying”?  It seems that technology, which is readily at our finger tips 24/7, has created yet another dilemma - what to do if a baby is crying? 

Pre-cell phone days, there really was not much to do if you the parent left home and your baby/child started crying.  Outside of calling the restaurant, store, movie theater (directly), and asking them to page a parent, most of us just muddled through a crying child.  I also think that in most cases, said child eventually stopped crying (unless there was an obvious reason that could be “fixed”) and by the time you the parent returned home, all was typically well.  

But now, with a cell phone in every hand, it only takes one call to summon the parent of a crying child.  I think this is a good news/bad news dilemma.  The good news is: parents may feel more comfortable leaving their child with a babysitter, knowing that they may be reached in the event of an emergency.  The bad news is:  is a baby or child who is only crying, typically an emergency?  Depends on your definition. 

The reason I bring this up is that I often hear young parents, and especially mothers, tell me that during the first several months of their infant’s life, they cannot leave the house for more than minutes, before being called home....because the baby is crying.  Some of these mothers are really “stressed out and exhausted” and need a bit of a get-away to “re-boot”. I am not talking about a trip to the day spa. I am simply talking about an hour or 2 to go to the store or meet a friend for lunch or just sit alone in the park and read a book.  Just a bit of quiet after being home with a baby day in and day out for the first 4 weeks of their newborn’s life.  If you have been there you understand. 

But, now that they have a cell phone, there is CONSTANT communication.  The minute the baby cries, the cell phone rings....”the baby is CRYING, come home.”  My husband would tell you that his best parenting started the first time I left him alone with our first son and I actually went away for the weekend.  (I believe the baby was 6 or 7 weeks old and off I went breast pump in hand to a reunion.)  No cell phones then, and guess what, he did a great job!!!!  He told me how after the first 24 hours he figured out that he really didn’t have to have the baby in the bathroom with him in order to take a shower. He later told me that the first shower he took, not only was our son in the room in his “bouncy” chair, but he left the shower door open as the door got steamy and he couldn’t see the baby!! How cute is that. 

Technology, as wonderful as it is, may also enable us to “cop out” when things get a bit difficult.  That goes for parenting as well. 

Turnoff your phone off sometime and let the “other parent” or babysitter handle it for awhile. Being disconnected is NOT always a bad thing!

Daily Dose

Foods You Can Eat When Breast Feeding

1.30

Should breast feeding moms avoid certain foods?I was making hospital rounds today and talking to all of the new moms (and dads) about their newborns.  I love talking to new parents about the importance of having healthy meals to support breast feeding! I even had a young dad asking “what foods should I avoid cooking for my wife while breast feeding?”  How cute is that! Can we clone him?!

After breast feeding my 3 children, I have decided that you can really eat whatever you want!  I know some people swear that certain foods you eat will cause a breast fed baby to have gas. But think about it, bottle fed babies and breast fed infants all have GAS!  None of the formulas contain broccoli, or cauliflower or beans or tomatoes and bottle fed babies have gas too. It is just a fact, newborn babies are gassy for the first several months as their digestive tracts mature. And yes, it is stinky too! So… I told this dad, “good for you for cooking for your wife.  Make her healthy, well balanced meals and throw in a few of her favorite foods.”  I would not change anything unless you can definitely correlate that a food ALWAYS makes your baby more uncomfortable (and that is so hard to keep track of). Eat what you want (in moderation) to be healthy and happy.  I have no data but feel certain that happier mothers must in some way have an effect on a  baby, so at least enjoy mealtime. When I had a colicky baby (previous post), I tried eating only broth and bland foods, and with me equally miserable and starving…this stressful situation only got worse. Final words, if I was going to try eliminating anything from my diet while breastfeeding to try and help “relieve “a gassy baby, it would be excessive dairy, as there has been some data on this. Remember, everything in moderation. I’m willing to bet that by the time your baby is 4 months old (the magic age) you are not even worried about what you are eating, as you are having too much fun laughing with your baby! What foods (if any) bothered your baby while breast feeding? I would love your comments.  Leave them below. That’s your daily dose for today. We’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Vaccine Pain

1.00 to read

I am often reminded of the adage, “this is going to hurt me more than it hurts you” before beginning infant vaccinations. I can remember my own parents saying that to me before a spanking (the preferred discipline of my childhood) and that statement never made any sense to me until I too became a parent. 

As I discuss infant vaccinations with new parents, I somehow know that they are wishing they could “take the needles” for their own child. I really do believe that those first vaccines at 2 months of age “hurt the new parent, more than the infant”. It is an early parenting hurdle to get through those first immunizations and realize that your baby handled the vaccines without much ado and somehow the next set of vaccines at 4 and 6 months are a bit easier. Pain is not anything that a parent wants their child to endure, and if there is any way to mitigate the pain associated with immunizations I am all for it. 

Many parents come to my office prepared with sucrose to let their baby suck on during the immunizations.  I recently read an article in Pediatrics that showed the 5 S’s - swaddling, side/stomach positioning, shushing, swinging and sucking on a pacifier significantly reduced the pain associated with vaccines in 2 and 4 month old infants. In fact the 5S’s worked “substantially better to reduce post vaccination pain than sucrose alone”. 

So, if you are concerned about the pain associated with your infant’s vaccines, come ready to swaddle, shush, swing and let your baby have a pacifier as well. A little tummy time after the immunizations might be good medicine too. 

But more importantly, remember that by vaccinating your baby you are protecting them from disease for their entire childhood and into adolescence (when I am not sure the immunizations are any easier). 

The 5S’s seem like an easy solution for parent and baby, and a lollipop or ice cream cone goes a long way for pain relief in the 4-11 year old set as well. Vaccines are a moment of pain for a lifetime of gain for sure!

Daily Dose

Lactose Intolerance

How do you know if your child is lactose intolerant?A parent emailed me via our iPhone App and asked if her child’s constipation, which started as he was transitioning from formula to whole milk, could be a sign of lactose intolerance. She is concerned because her son is now having very hard stools.

Actually, lactose intolerance does not typically cause constipation, but conversely causes abdominal pain and often loose stools or diarrhea.  In the case of this 1 year old child who suddenly is having hard stools, it may seem to be “caused” by the switch from formula to whole milk, but is probably coincidental. It is routinely recommended that parents stop giving a child a bottle and formula at 1 year, which often results in a toddler drinking less milk (recommended amount is about 16 ounces /day) and therefore they are getting less fluid which may result in harder stools. This is also the age that children’s diets are changing as they are self feeding and often eat a lot of carbohydrates (breads, noodles, rice etc) and fewer fruits and vegetables, even when offered as they become “pickier” eaters. All told this often leads to bouts of constipation that can be managed with the addition of more fluids as well as clever ideas such as apple prune juice, bite sized prunes (often can be “sold” as raisins to a young child) and even with milk of magnesia if necessary. (see older posts on constipation) Lactose intolerance is defined as the inability to digest lactose which is a sugar found in milk and milk products.  It is due to a deficiency in the enzyme lactase, which is produced by cells lining the small intestine.  Lactose intolerance is uncommon in young children and is typically not seen before the age of 2 -3 years.  It is more common in older children and teens who may complain of abdominal pain, cramping, gas, bloating and diarrhea after ingesting dairy products. In most cases lactose intolerance is diagnosed on clinical history alone, and if suspected is managed by eliminating dairy products to see if the symptoms improve.  In many cases even children with a lactase deficiency may tolerate some lactose in their diet such as a scoop of ice cream, or milk on their cereal, but only experience symptoms when they have “too much milk”. Fortunately, there are products, such as lactose free milk, which will provide a child with the necessary vitamin D and calcium which is so important during childhood. Dietary supplements should also be used in children who do not drink milk in order that they meet their daily calcium and vitamin D requirements. Lastly, lactose intolerance is different than a milk allergy which is fairly uncommon and is due to an allergy to the proteins in milk, not the lactose.  True milk allergy usually presents in early infancy. That's your daily dose.  We'll chat again tomorrow! Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

A Baby's Neck Issue

1:30 to read

Torticollis is becoming more and more common and it may be related to several different things. Torticollis is defined as a “twisted neck”, or as my grandmother used to say, a “wry neck”.  Most of us have experienced a tight neck after a bad night’s sleep, and you can hardly turn your head to back out of the garage it is so painful, but be reassured your baby does not have any discomfort, but will just hold their head somewhat “tilted”.

A baby’s 40 weeks spent in utero may cause some positional deformities of the head and neck.  Due to the intrauterine positioning a baby may “favor” turning their head to one side rather than another. At the same time back sleeping which is recommended for all babies, may also contribute to torticollis.  

In order to help the baby resolve the tightness in the neck which is actually due to the sternocleidomastoid muscle being tight, your doctor may have you do several things early on to help stretch the neck muscle.  

If your baby prefers to look to the right they have left sided torticollis. In this case turn your baby in the crib so they have to turn to the left to look out (they don’t want to face a boring wall). When you are feeding them have the bottle on your right arm. When changing diapers, place the baby so that they have to tur left to see you.  Hold the baby on your left hip as well and burp them on your right shoulder. All of these strategies will help to stretch the muscle.  On top of this the baby needs to have tummy time, when awake, and work of having them turn to the left during this time too. Lastly, do gentle neck stretches 3-4 times a day and massage the tight muscle.  

If your baby prefers to look to the left also called right sided torticollis, reverse the above.

Your baby should continue to work on stretching so that their head will also not get flattened on one side or another, which is called plagiocephaly.  By continuing to have tummy time and neck stretches, most cases of torticollis will resolve. In severe cases or when you don’t feel that the baby is improving,  ask you doctor about the possibility of physical therapy.

Daily Dose

Rice Cereal & Childhood Obesity

Does white rice cereal cause childhood obesity? One pediatrician thinks so.I recently saw Dr. Alan Greene on TV discussing infant feeding practices and how that may relate to the problem of childhood obesity. Dr. Greene, like most pediatricians, has long been a proponent of healthy eating. He recently launched his “White Out” campaign to change how babies are introduced to solid foods.

His argument is that an infant’s first food has long been rice cereal.   Rice cereal is typically introduced to a baby between 5 – 6 months of age when they are just beginning to sit up in a high chair, and may be fed with a spoon. Rice cereal  typically comes in a box and breast milk or formula is added to the dried flakes in order to make it the consistency where the  baby may be  offered a few bites from a spoon. Although rice is a “white grain” there are also other infant cereal products available, and there are no “directives” that say that a brown rice or mixed grain cereal may not  be used. As I understand it, the whole idea is really just to get the baby used to spoon feeding and then I begin introducing my infant patients to vegetables and fruits. So, the idea that the baby rice cereal is somehow linked to the entire problem of childhood obesity seems somewhat shortsighted to me. An infant is only fed rice cereal one or two times a day while still receiving either breast milk or a formula. Remember that breast milk and formulas contain carbohydrates too. Infant cereal whether it be brown or white rice should not be the only food a baby is introduced too, nor should they eat cereal all day long. While Dr. Greene is concerned that babies will “get hooked on the taste of highly processed foods”, I'm more concerned that parents will quickly forgo rice and whole grain cereals, fruits, veggies and meats and begin feeding their children frosted or honey nut cheerios (a favorite early finger food),  as wells as goldfish and puffs, pasta and other white foods.  These are the foods I  am most likely to see in my office, not a bowl fruits and vegetables. Babies really get the  majority of their calories from breast milk or formula until about 9 – 12 months of age. Parents should be encouraged to feed their babies a wide array of healthy foods including cereals, vegetables, fruits and meats.  Dr. Greene is right,  a baby doesn’t tell you he won’t eat brown rice, or oatmeal or spinach or prunes. For the most part an infant happily opens their mouths and will take what is fed to them. The problem occurs a little later as babies start to show a preference for foods , whether that is by making a face, or pushing food away, they definitely show preferences. This is when the idea of getting “hooked on foods” really begins. It is not uncommon for me to hear a parent of a one year old say, “my baby doesn’t like…… squash, or cereal, or peaches.”  Soon thereafter you hear, “my toddler will only eat…..fill in the blank”. Those are the words that send shivers down my spine. Trying to get those parents to buy into the fix the meal and they will eat it if they are hungry is quite a difficult concept at times. The issue is not only beginning a baby on rice cereal, the problem is more complex. It is getting parents to understand that our children will always have food preferences, that does not mean that we need to acknowledge them or submit to them. It means that we need to make good healthy meals for our families, white rice or brown rice is only the beginning of the story. That's your daily dose for today. What do you think? Leave your comments below!

Daily Dose

Baby Naming in the Hospital

1:15 to read

An interesting article was published this week in Pediatrics. If you have had a baby or visited the newborn nursery you typically see that a newborn is named “Babygirl or Babyboy Smith” on their crib and chart.  These are the temporary names given until the baby is named and the birth certificate is filled out. Well, it seems that these temporary names can cause quite a bit of confusion and may also contribute to medical errors, especially when there are babies with the same last name.   

These temporary names are even more problematic when a newborn is admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), which was the case for my grand daughter last summer. While there may be few orders in the regular newborn nursery which are used for every baby, in the NICU each baby has many different orders and issues.  

A study was done looking at ways to cut down on medical errors in orders written in the NICU by using more distinct temporary names for newborns. In the study they incorporated using a mother’s first name into the newborn’s first name (for example, Susansgirl Smith). By changing the manner in which temporary names were used there was a 36% reduction in orders being placed in the wrong chart and then having to be retracted.

So, the next time you head to the NICU or newborn nursery for a visit you may soon notice a difference in the way temporary names are used. I can see how this would really make a difference as we often have several newborns in the nursery with the same last names and it can be confusing, even when the chart is labelled “name alert”. I like this idea and I would think it would be easy to implement this change without needing a lot of new training or computer programs.  We will all just get used to seeing longer temporary names on those baby cribs!

Daily Dose

"White Noise" and Babies

1.00 to read

I received an email from Meredith (via our iPhone app) because she had heard that “white noise” might cause a child to have speech/language delays. She used a sound machine in her children’s rooms at night, and was concerned about the possibility of “interfering with their speech”.

So, I did a little research and found an article from the journal Science in 2003.  A study from the University of CA at San Francisco (UCSF) actually looked at baby rats who listened to “white noise” for prolonged periods of time. The researchers found that the part of the auditory cortex (in rats) that is responsible for hearing, did not develop properly after listening to the “white noise”.   

Interestingly, when the “white noise” was taken away, the brain resumed normal development. Again, this study was in baby rats, and to my knowledge has not been duplicated.  But, these baby rats were exposed to hours on end of  "white noise” which may not be the same thing as sleeping with a “sound machine” at night. 

We might need to be more concerned about background “white noise”. We do know that babies learn language by listening and absorbing human speech. They need to hear their parent’s talking to them from the time they are born.  They listen to not only their parent’s speech, but also to siblings, grandparents etc. and from an early age respond to that language by making cooing sounds themselves, often imitating the sounds they have heard. They are also exposed to a great deal of “white noise” or background noise with the televisions being on, computers, telephones, vacuum cleaners, lawn mowers etc. going on all day.  The “white noise” that may be reduced by turning off televisions, videos, computers etc and replacing that background noise with human speech through reading, singing and just talking to your baby and child could only be beneficial. One might surmise that “white noise” in the form of a sound machine at night would not affect a child’s speech development, as this is not a time for language acquisition.

Having a good bedtime routine, reading to your child before bed, or singing them a lullaby will encourage language development, and the sound machine may ensure a good night’s sleep.  Just turn it off in the morning!

That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow. 

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

A few life lessons & fun with Elf on the Shelf!

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.