Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Your Baby

Fisher-Price Recalls Infant Cradle Swings

1:30

Fisher-Price is recalling three models of their cradle swings: CHM84 Soothing Savanna Cradle 'n Swing, CMR40 Sweet Surroundings Cradle 'n Swing, and CMR43 Sweet Surroundings Butterfly Friends Cradle 'n Swing.

The swings have two different swinging motions - rocking side-to-side, or swinging head-to-toe, and six different swing speeds from low to high. The product number is located on the seat under the pad. 

When the seat peg is not fully engaged the seat can fall unexpectedly, posing a risk of injury to the child.

Fisher-Price has received two reports of a seat peg coming out from the seat, causing the seat to fall. No injuries have been reported.

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled cradle swing and contact Fisher-Price for revised assembly instructions.

The infant cradle swings were sold at buybuyBaby, Target and other stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com and other websites from November 2015 through March 2016 for about $170.

Consumers can contact Fisher-Price at 800-432-5437 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or online at www.service.mattel.com and click on Recalls & Safety Alerts for more information. 

Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2016/Fisher-Price-Recalls-Infant-Cradle-Swings/#remedy

Daily Dose

Learning to Crawl

1.15 to read

Back to more funny office stories - they really keep my job interesting and always a little bit of fun. 

Many of my “new” young parents worry (haven’t we all?) and one of the new comments I have started to hear is “why is my baby not crawling?” Well, for one reason, they are only 6 months old!  I know we are expecting children to achieve some milestones at younger and younger ages, an example of this is reading.  But while not all children are ready to read at 4-5 years, MOST children do not crawl until they are around 9 months of age. 

I am suddenly having moms and a few dads ask me how to “teach their baby to crawl”?   What???  This is new to me.  I wish I could remember   each of my own children as they learned to crawl. It is just a foggy memory now, but I do remember that suddenly they were mobile, and that changes everything! 

Babies instinctively want to move and explore their environment. For most babies, if you have been doing “tummy time”, which is followed by your baby learning to sit, they suddenly figure out how to go from the sitting position back to their tummy.   Why?  That maneuver is the precursor to learning to crawl.  They just do it!  You need to put them on the floor and let them figure it out. You DO NOT need to crawl around the house.  

While you will have to help “teach” your child to walk, in a manner of speaking, they WILL just crawl if given the opportunity.  That means putting them down and letting them figure out how to move. I had one mother who asked me if “her baby could sit in the grass?”  She was afraid to even let the child touch the ground. Other parents are worried that it is “too dirty” for their child to sit on the floor and crawl.  The world is full of dirt, grass and who knows what else, but children have to spend some time on the floor to learn to crawl.   

Take home message....no instructions for a baby to crawl, they just figure it out, and we parents figure out that some of the things our wonderful children accomplish are despite us!

Daily Dose

Ear Tugging & Your Child

1.15 to read

I see a lot of parents who bring their baby/toddler/child in to the pediatrician with concerns that their child might have an ear infection. One of the reasons for their concern is often that their baby is tugging on their ears.  

Babies find their ears, just like their hands and feet, around 4 -6 months of age.  I guess a baby must think “this ear tugging is fun and feels good” as maybe babies have “itchy” ears just like adults. It also seems to be a self soothing habit for other children who seem to pull on their ears when they get tired and cranky.  Maybe it is related to new molars coming in at the back of the jaw line?   

Whatever the cause, it often concerns parents who are told by their friends or relatives, “I am worried, this ear pulling probably means the child has an ear infection”.  So, being a good parent off you go to your pediatrician only to find out that the ears a beautiful and clear! 

Most babies and children do not get an ear infection without ANY other symptoms besides ear pulling.  In most cases infants and toddlers will get a secondary ear infection during cold and flu season. The multitudes of viral respiratory infections that children get in the first 3 years of life, often cause continuous runny noses and congestion. This congestion causes fluid to build up in the middle ear space which connects to the nasal passages via a small canal called the eustachian tube.   

Infants and children have so called “immature” eustachian tubes that are soft, and don’t drain well and the tube gets inflamed and swollen from the viral infection as well.  At times this fluid gets secondarily infected from bacteria that find their way to the middle ear.  Voila....an ear infection ensues. 

So, if a parent brings their child in for “pulling on their ears” and they are otherwise well (no cough, congestion, runny nose and sleeping well) I usually ask if they want to “wager” if their child has an ear infection.  That is really not fair, as this sweet parent is only concerned because typically someone else told them they should be.  But, in this case a quarter bet is usually made and I end up with a lot of quarters.  (they are good for all of the other bets I do lose with parents and kids about all sorts of things). Friendly betting at the pediatrician’s office, wonder if I am going to be investigated! 

Don’t worry about simple ear pulling especially when you see it happening all of the time.   

Lastly, with the new guidelines for prescribing antibiotics for an ear infection parent’s don’t need to worry as much about a prescription for antibiotics and a few days of waiting will not hurt.  

Daily Dose

Belly Button Care

1:15 to read

Belly buttons seem to make new parents a bit crazy.  Once the “lifeline” from mother to child is clamped in the delivery room, the umbilical cord really serves no further purpose...other than to cause a lot of anxiety and annoyance for new parents.

I get many questions concerning “how to fold the diaper” and “not rub the cord” or “what if I got a little water on the cord when I gave the baby a sponge bath?”.  I had a text today saying, “the cord is dripping a bit of blood, did we do something to it?” 

It typically takes anywhere from 5-14 days for the cord to fall off. During that time it typically just “sits” there...and dries up. Some hospitals still apply gentian violet to the umbilical cord and others now just leave it alone and let it dry.  Either way....your job is to try to ignore the cord and just let it fall off.

As the cord dries up and it detaches it may bleed a bit...remember the umbilical stump is like a scab.  It is not uncommon to see if few drops of blood or dried blood on the edge of the diaper.  As the cord detaches even more there may be a part that oozes a bit as well....but don’t be concerned, just like a skinned knee your child will have one day...the scab will heal with a bit of time and TLC.

Once the cord falls off you can now give your baby a bath...no more sponge bathing. And don’t worry if the belly button is a bit of an “outy, as it will often change over time unless there is an umbilical hernia...which is yet another discussion.

Daily Dose

Research Supports "Back to Sleep"

1.00 to read

This month’s issue of The Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine has an interesting article on sleep position in infants. A recent issue of The Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine has an interesting article on sleep position in infants. As I have discussed previously, the safest position for an infant’s sleep is on their backs.

Placing a baby “back to sleep” became a routine recommendation beginning in 1994 after evidence showed that babies who slept on their backs had a much lower risk for sudden infant death syndrome. SIDS is the leading cause of death for children under the age of one year. In this study out of Yale University, researchers found that the number of babies who were put on their backs to sleep increased from 25 percent to 70 percent since the recommendations changed in 1994. But in this study, the number of caregivers heading this advice has not changed since 2001. The researchers looked at how different caregivers positioned their babies for sleep to see if there were any factors affecting a caregiver’s choice of an infant’s sleeping position. Interestingly, one of the factors was whether or not the caregiver was ever told to place the baby on their back to sleep. One-third of those surveyed said that their doctor did recommend that their child sleep on their backs, but many did not receive any recommendation. How is a parent to know how to position their baby for sleep if their doctor does not discuss sleep positioning? Another factor, which influenced a caregiver’s choice of infant sleep position, was comfort. Again, more than one-third of those surveyed felt like the baby was more comfortable on their tummy. Another 10 percent were worried that an infant might choke if they were lying on their back. It is imperative that physicians discuss infant sleep position with parents and the need to reiterate this is evident in my own practice. Just today I saw a two-month-old baby with her mother and babysitter. The mother and I had discussed “back to sleep” (this is her third child), but the babysitter happened to mention that she “puts the baby on her tummy to sleep if she is in the room watching her”. It doesn’t matter if you are in the room, sleeping next to the baby, or watching on one of those new video monitors. Placing babies on their backs to sleep remains the most effective means to reduce the risk of SIDS, and there are few exceptions. The risk of a baby sleeping on their tummy “because they seem more comfortable” is just too great. The evidence is compelling. So…. until your child is old enough to role all over their crib, put them “back to sleep” and know that you are doing the very best thing to protect your baby. Tummy time is only for awake time. Don’t cheat! That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

Jaundice in Newborns

1:30 to read

It is not at all uncommon for a healthy newborn to develop jaundice in the first several days of life. Bilirubin is produced when red blood cells are broken down. It is a yellow pigment that we all metabolize in the liver and then it is excreted in urine and stools. In an newborn, the body produces almost 2-3 times the bilirubin that an adult does. Because newborns are also “immature” their liver cannot keep up with the bilirubin production and therefore bilirubin levels rise. In some cases the bilirubin is high enough to cause a yellowing of the skin (jaundice), and this is termed physiologic jaundice of the newborn. 

 

Your infant will have their bilirubin level checked while they are in the hospital and your pediatrician will follow any bilirubin levels that seem to be rising. In most hospitals the bilirubin is tested transcutaneously (through the skin), and you may never know that you baby has been tested. If bilirubin levels seem to be high, a blood test will be performed to more accurately assess the bilirubin level. If bilirubin levels continue to rise a baby may then be put under phototherapy (special blue lights that breaks down bilirubin in the skin and help it to be eliminated). Phototherapy prevents extremely high levels of bilirubin which may get into the brain and could be toxic to the baby and cause brain damage.

 

When a baby is put under phototherapy they may be in a basinette or wrapped in a “bili-blanket”  and they will wear sunglasses to prevent any damage to their eyes from light. They are usually naked or only in a diaper so that as much skin is exposed as possible. In most cases the bilirubin levels have peaked by day of life 3 or 4 and the baby will no longer need phototherapy. While the baby is under the “bili-lights” they will continue to have blood tests (from their heels) to follow the bilirubin levels.

 

As babies are now being discharged in 24-48 hours after delivery some babies will develop jaundice after they have already gone home…so you your doctor will plan on seeing you 1 to 2 days after your are discharged. But, should you notice that your baby seems to be getting more jaundiced you should call you doctor and be seen sooner.  

 

Just this week I saw a baby who continued to become more jaundiced after he went home. At times I see this when a mother is breast feeding and her milk has not yet “come in”.  If a baby is not getting a lot of milk then they cannot poop and pee out bilirubin…somethings just take time to get going with feeding, peeing, pooping and liver maturation. So…this baby boy was started o home phototherapy. Rather than re-admitting him to the hospital, a pediatric home health care company sent out a nurse with a bill blanket who instructed the parents on the use of it. The baby was then able to feed at home every 2-3 hours, and the bili-blanket was used throughout the day and night. The parents lived so close to the office that they would bring the baby in for bilirubin tests, while in other cases the nurse will go to the home to do the testing.  Home phototherapy in an otherwise healthy infant does not disrupt the new family and really helps the mother establish her breast feeding and lets “everyone” sleep in their own beds!

 

This baby only required phototherapy for 24 hours…in some babies it may be longer. Once the bilirubin was back in a “safe range” the lights were discontinued and he will continue to process the bilirubin on his own. His little yellow face and eyes will be the last evidence of his newborn jaundice and “one for the baby books” as it should never be a problem again.

 

Daily Dose

Are Parents Too Connected?

1.30 to read

Has your spouse, babysitter or other child care provider ever called you to come home “because the baby is crying”?  It seems that technology, which is readily at our finger tips 24/7, has created yet another dilemma - what to do if a baby is crying? 

Pre-cell phone days, there really was not much to do if you the parent left home and your baby/child started crying.  Outside of calling the restaurant, store, movie theater (directly), and asking them to page a parent, most of us just muddled through a crying child.  I also think that in most cases, said child eventually stopped crying (unless there was an obvious reason that could be “fixed”) and by the time you the parent returned home, all was typically well.  

But now, with a cell phone in every hand, it only takes one call to summon the parent of a crying child.  I think this is a good news/bad news dilemma.  The good news is: parents may feel more comfortable leaving their child with a babysitter, knowing that they may be reached in the event of an emergency.  The bad news is:  is a baby or child who is only crying, typically an emergency?  Depends on your definition. 

The reason I bring this up is that I often hear young parents, and especially mothers, tell me that during the first several months of their infant’s life, they cannot leave the house for more than minutes, before being called home....because the baby is crying.  Some of these mothers are really “stressed out and exhausted” and need a bit of a get-away to “re-boot”. I am not talking about a trip to the day spa. I am simply talking about an hour or 2 to go to the store or meet a friend for lunch or just sit alone in the park and read a book.  Just a bit of quiet after being home with a baby day in and day out for the first 4 weeks of their newborn’s life.  If you have been there you understand. 

But, now that they have a cell phone, there is CONSTANT communication.  The minute the baby cries, the cell phone rings....”the baby is CRYING, come home.”  My husband would tell you that his best parenting started the first time I left him alone with our first son and I actually went away for the weekend.  (I believe the baby was 6 or 7 weeks old and off I went breast pump in hand to a reunion.)  No cell phones then, and guess what, he did a great job!!!!  He told me how after the first 24 hours he figured out that he really didn’t have to have the baby in the bathroom with him in order to take a shower. He later told me that the first shower he took, not only was our son in the room in his “bouncy” chair, but he left the shower door open as the door got steamy and he couldn’t see the baby!! How cute is that. 

Technology, as wonderful as it is, may also enable us to “cop out” when things get a bit difficult.  That goes for parenting as well. 

Turnoff your phone off sometime and let the “other parent” or babysitter handle it for awhile. Being disconnected is NOT always a bad thing!

Daily Dose

SIDS Risks

1.30 to read

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is every parent’s worst nightmare. From the time a family has their new baby until that child is 1 year of age, SIDS is of a concern. 

Most new parents in 2012 know about the Back to Sleep campaign (BTS), which was recommended by the AAP in 1994. After  the recommendation for newborn’s sleep position was changed from prone (tummy) to supine (back) the incidence of SIDS in the U.S. showed a sharp decline (more than 50%) over the first 10 year period. Unfortunately, the overall SIDS rate has plateaued since that time, and SIDS is still the leading cause of infant mortality in the U.S. 

A study in the April 2012 issue of the journal Pediatrics looked at risk factors for SIDS. Parents need to know that greatest risk for SIDS is during the first 12 months of life (the so named “Critical” development period). There are also both intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors for SIDS as well. All of these factors contribute to the vulnerability for SIDS. 

The peak incidence for SIDS is still between 2-4 months of a baby’s life. (postnatal age). The intrinsic risk factors for SIDS include, male gender, prematurity, genetic differences (now being found called polymorphisms) and a child’s prenatal exposure to cigarettes and/or alcohol. Extrinsic risk factors include tummy or side sleep position, bed sharing, over bundling, soft bedding and a child’s face being covered.  In this study 99% of SIDS infants had at least 1 risk factor, and 57% had at least 2 extrinsic and 1 intrinsic risk factors. Only 5% of the SIDS victims studied had no extrinsic risk. I think this is important for all parents to know! 

So what can parent’s do to lower the risk of SIDS for their baby?  Well, while you cannot change the peak incidence of SIDS between 2-4 months of a baby’s life there is a lot you can do! 

Looking at intrinsic factors:  gender is a 50-50 deal and seeing that I have 3 sons, I don’t know a lot about gender selection, so will not even touch that topic. But, you can prevent prenatal cigarette and alcohol exposure, and every pregnant mother (and father due to second had smoke issues) should eliminate smoking. That sounds easy enough. 

Prematurity may be lessened when a mother is healthy prior to her pregnancy and continues to do as much as possible during her pregnancy to ensure a full term birth. Basically maintaining a healthy diet, getting good prenatal care and listening to your doctor will help to prevent many pre-term births. 

Extrinsic factors are the easiest to change. While prone sleep positioning is a large risk factor for SIDS, there is now evidence that some other risks may appear in conjunction with sleep position.  Putting a baby on their side where they may roll to their tummies may be one issue.  Leaving soft objects or blanket in the crib may be another. Bed sharing is also not advised. 

So, the so-called “triple risk factors” for SIDS may be important information in providing risk reduction strategies for parents and caregivers. Any change that may lessen the risk of SIDS is meaningful and beneficial and will help new parents sleep a bit better as well!  I also did not see any mention of video cameras in the room as a reduction in risk, just saying..... 

That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

"White Noise" and Babies

1.00 to read

I received an email from Meredith (via our iPhone app) because she had heard that “white noise” might cause a child to have speech/language delays. She used a sound machine in her children’s rooms at night, and was concerned about the possibility of “interfering with their speech”.

So, I did a little research and found an article from the journal Science in 2003.  A study from the University of CA at San Francisco (UCSF) actually looked at baby rats who listened to “white noise” for prolonged periods of time. The researchers found that the part of the auditory cortex (in rats) that is responsible for hearing, did not develop properly after listening to the “white noise”.   

Interestingly, when the “white noise” was taken away, the brain resumed normal development. Again, this study was in baby rats, and to my knowledge has not been duplicated.  But, these baby rats were exposed to hours on end of  "white noise” which may not be the same thing as sleeping with a “sound machine” at night. 

We might need to be more concerned about background “white noise”. We do know that babies learn language by listening and absorbing human speech. They need to hear their parent’s talking to them from the time they are born.  They listen to not only their parent’s speech, but also to siblings, grandparents etc. and from an early age respond to that language by making cooing sounds themselves, often imitating the sounds they have heard. They are also exposed to a great deal of “white noise” or background noise with the televisions being on, computers, telephones, vacuum cleaners, lawn mowers etc. going on all day.  The “white noise” that may be reduced by turning off televisions, videos, computers etc and replacing that background noise with human speech through reading, singing and just talking to your baby and child could only be beneficial. One might surmise that “white noise” in the form of a sound machine at night would not affect a child’s speech development, as this is not a time for language acquisition.

Having a good bedtime routine, reading to your child before bed, or singing them a lullaby will encourage language development, and the sound machine may ensure a good night’s sleep.  Just turn it off in the morning!

That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow. 

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

When should you keep your child home from school?

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.