Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Daily Dose

New Trend: Placenta Capsules?

1.30 to read

Okay, have you heard of placental encapsulation?  I recently had a new mother tell me about dissecting her placenta and putting it in capsules - which she swallows. I must say, I was gagging a bit while she explained this to me.  So like everyone else I went on line and looked up any data on this “new” trend. 

There is not much science on this subject, but plenty of sites that advertise people who are “placental encapsulators”. The practice of consuming the placenta is actually called placentaphagy - still sounds gross to me.  I know other species consume their placentas - but rarely is it done by humans.  

According to my patient’s mother (who also happened to be a patient of mine when she was a child), the placenta is supposed to help mother’s breast milk and provide hormonal “balance” post partum and thereby also reduce the incidence of post partum blues and depression.  (As a side note - I saw this young mother on day #4 post partum and she was teary and tired - just like most new mothers, despite the placenta pills).

The father of the new baby explained that he was given the placenta, in a “bio hazard” container after his wife’s delivery. He took it home and kept it in the refrigerator until the local placenta encapsulator person arrived at his house to begin the process. 

She “dried” the placenta in an apparatus (kind of like making your own beef jerky in a dissicator) and then 24 hours later crushed the dried placenta in her “Cuisinart” after which the mixture was placed in capsules.  My patient’s mother is now taking 2 tablets 4x/day and will do this until the capsules are gone. The number of days that you take the placenta depends on how much “dried placenta” is obtained - not a very precise science.

So.....I continue to learn new trends everyday.  This one is a bit tough for me to “swallow”.  I am awaiting science to have data that this is safe and worthwhile.  In the meantime, I have my study of one to gather data from.

 

Daily Dose

Your Baby's 1st Cold

1.30 to read

Has your baby had their first cold yet?  It is just the beginning of cold season and there are many more colds ahead during the next 5 months of upper respiratory season.  

I remember as a mom/pediatrician that the first cold a baby has is the hardest. Like so many things in life, once you have some on the job training, you can look back and realize that you can manage many issues, including the common cold. 

A baby with a cold looks like we all do, they have red rimmed eyes, a runny nose, a cough and they act like they don’t feel well. A baby may also run a bit of a fever on the first day of a cold, so remember, “fever is your friend” (another post). 

The best way to treat a cold is the same for baby/child/adult, you just have to treat your symptoms. Unfortunately, there is still not a cure for the common cold, and when there is one day, the cure will win the Nobel Prize in Medicine! 

For an infant, one of the biggest problems is the congestion and runny nose and the fact that cannot yet blow (or even pick) their own nose.  But, at the same time they are snotty and have a hard time breast feeding or taking a bottle and worst of all they don’t sleep well. Us older parents were used to using the bulb syringe, but now the parents of babies are swearing by the “Nosefrida”. 

I must admit I was totally skeptical and thought they were inserting this contraption way into their baby’s nostril!  We doctors used to use a “deLee” catheter somewhat like this in the delivery room to clear a baby’s nose but this little device is placed at the edge of the nostril, rather than into the nose itself.  

A small tube extends from this and the parent then uses their mouth to suck on the tube (like a straw) and the mucous is sucked into this little tube with a filter to keep the mucous from going up the tube. (no buggies in the mouth). Does that all make sense?  You can use just the right amount of suction with your mouth and then you can see the mucous come out of the nose and throw away the tube and filter. 

 I remember that gross bulb syringe I used long ago had disgusting stuff inside of it once I cut it open to investigate, so this little “Nosefrida” seems to make sense. It also doesn’t upset the baby like putting a bulb syringe inside the nostril. 

Suctioning out the nose may make it easier for your baby to take their bottle and to sleep! This may mean you get a bit more sleep yourself, which is always at the top of the list for new parents. Regardless, remember it will take 7 - 10 days for your baby to get over their cold. 

Lastly, wash your hands and cross your fingers that you don’t catch it!

Daily Dose

Common Newborn Questions Answered!

Dr. Sue answers common questions about newborn babies.Well, it seems like it takes more than one column to discuss the first days home with a newborn baby.  After discussing the nuances of breast feeding, there are also many questions regarding all of the noises that babies make.

Everyone thinks that infants are pretty quiet, that is until you sleep with a newborn in the bassinet right next to your bed.  Newborns are noisy!!  They not only cry (that is a whole other topic) but they squeak, grunt, stretch, yawn, have weird breathing noises, hiccup and pass tons of gas. (Dad’s are so cute when they say, “there is something wrong with my baby girl as she FARTS and it stinks, this can’t be normal?”) The first thing that many parents will notice is that their infant has “weird” breathing patterns. The baby seems to take some rapid breaths and then pauses and it looks like “they have stopped breathing” for a few seconds, and then resumes their more normal breathing.   This is called periodic breathing and is quite normal for the first few weeks of a baby’s life.  I swear only first time parents notice this, as you have the time to watch your precious baby and count their breaths. Every subsequent baby in the family is equally loved, but is typically not under the microscope like a first born and we only notice that they are ‘’’breathing”.  As an infant matures so does the breathing pattern and the respiratory rate becomes more rhythmic. If your baby has any color changes, i.e  turns dusky, or blue with their breathing that is a cause for immediate concern and a call to the doctor or 911. Another common concern is often how many times a day a baby will hiccup. If you remember, the baby often hiccupped in utero, and this too continues after they are born. Babies seem to hiccup for an inordinate amount of time, which bothers parents, but usually seems not to faze the baby at all. It is fine to try and give your newborn water if they are hiccupping and it is really bothering either you or them, but is not necessary.  Just like an infant’s startle (Moro) reflex, babies seem to get the hiccups when they are younger and they slow down as the baby’s nervous system matures.  A baby may hiccup for minutes to an hour and then just stop and fall asleep, oblivious to the concern that this event has caused their parents. Babies also make a lot of stretching and grunting and groaning noises, and are perfectly comfortable.  But these noises will awaken a sleeping parent.  If your baby is not crying during all of these noises, I would not pick he/she up, but would wait to see if they then go back to sleep. Some of these noises occur even while a baby is sound asleep. In this case the adage, “never wake a sleeping baby” is good advice.  These noises do not necessarily mean a baby needs to eat, especially if you think they may have just eaten an hour ago. Again, your baby should not appear in any distress or have color changes, they are just noisy! Lastly, GAS!  All babies have gas, and no one knows that until they have cared for a newborn.  It does not matter if a baby is breast or bottle fed, they produce gas, and it is loud and may be stinky. I think that infants produce more gas in the first 3-4 months of life than they will again until they are old (grandparents age, ask them). It seems like so many things occur both early and later in life, and gas is just one example. As a newborn’s GI tract matures, they seem to produce less gas, and are also often more comfortable after a feeding. When a baby is “gassy” they often like to have movement, so they like to be rocked, or put on their tummy and patted (only if awake, never to sleep), and they may enjoy the swing, or the motion of riding in a car, or putting the infant seat on top or a vibrating washing machine or dryer.  There are many “home remedies” but maturation of the GI tract just takes time. In most cases, changing an infant’s formula or a mother’s diet will not change the gas, but many people will try it. Remember, this too shall pass! 
(no pun intended) That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow. Send your question or comment to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

What New Babies Need

1:30 to read

I have many friends whose own children are now having babies and they always ask, “what all do we need to have/buy for a new baby these days?”  While many things have changed since I had my own children, many have not,  and I still think “less is more” is a good adage to follow, especially for a newborn.  We all have a tendency to buy too much, or the “latest and greatest” only to find out that it is not necessary.

Carseat - a rear facing car seat is a must for your newborn!!!  Look at all of the reviews on line and pick which seat works best for you.  Do you want one with a base that you can also clip on to a stroller?  Remember your baby will sit in a rear facing car seat until 2 years. This is one item I would spend my money on!!

The baby needs a place to sleep so buy a crib and a good mattress.  If you are going to have more than one baby I would buy something that will last through several children. I like having a crib (rather than a toddler bed), as your baby will be in the crib for several years and then can move to a regular bed…no need for an “in between”.  Do not use an “old” crib that has drop sides, due to safety concerns. So that means the one that I had kept in the garage (from my kids) was a throw away! I usually move the first child to a bed when I need the crib for the next baby…no specific age. Bumpers are no longer recommended, so that saves money too!

Changing table or dresser for the millions of diaper changes.  It is so helpful to not have to bend over each time. I would also buy a diaper cream (Dr. Smiths, Destin or Butt paste) to have on hand….your baby will probably get a diaper rash at some time during their time in a diaper.

Baby bath tub: while you can bathe your baby in the sink, the newer bathtubs do make it easier for a newborn and you can use it in the tub as well until your baby can sit up alone. Remember, you will NEVER leave your child in the tub alone…even with all of the seats, rings and things  that they sell to support your baby!!  For bathing I like gentle bath wash like Cetaphil, Cerave, and Eucerin products….good for all skin types.  Pick one!

Swaddle blankets: WOW there are a million on the market and they all “claim” to help your baby to sleep better. I don’t think any of the products say “it will also takes weeks to months for your baby to sleep through the night” , no matter what you use.  I do like the thin swaddle blankets as they are useful for a number of things besides swaddling. Once you have your baby have the nurses show you how to swaddle (quick and easy).  The Miracle Blanket, Woombie and Halo also make it easy to swaddle as well. Pick one (or two) and stick with that.  Remember, your baby is going to be put in their crib on their back whether swaddled or not!! NO TUMMY SLEEPING.  

Diaper Bag: again their are a million out there in all shapes, sizes and price points. In the beginning you need to have a pad for changing (you will end up changing that baby all sorts of weird places), diapers, burp clothes, wipes…as your baby gets bigger you will have bottles, cups, toys all shoved in there too. All of my patients seem to have a travel size Purell strapped to the side of the bag as well. I would get a bag that you can wipe out as there will be spills of all sorts of stuff in that bag I assure you!  Somehow, over time you go back to “less is more” and the diapers end up in your purse!!  

So…that is a start. Will do another post on some other products in the future. 

 

 

Daily Dose

New Test for Baby

1.30 to read

If you recently had a baby (or are getting ready to) you may have noticed another “test” being performed on your newborn before they leave the hospital. Earlier this year the American Academy of Pediatrics endorsed the routine use of pulse oximetry to enhance detection of critical congenital heart disease.  

Critical congenital heart defects (CCHD) are serious structural heart defects that are often associated with decreased oxygen levels in infants in the newborn period. These heart defects account for about 17-31% of all congenital heart disease (or about 4,800 babies born each year in the U.S.)  

While some of these defects are found on pre-natal ultrasounds, and some may be evident immediately after birth when the pediatrician hears a murmur or the baby has difference in their pulses, others may not present until a baby is several hours - days of age.  Using pulse oximetry to measure a baby’s oxygen levels before they are discharged is just another method of screening a child, and if there are abnormalities a baby would undergo further evaluation with an echocardiogram and would see a pediatric cardiologist. 

Pulse oximetry is routinely used in all aspects of medicine these days and requires a simple non-invasive device that is placed on a babies finger or toe to measure the level of oxygen in the blood. (looks a little like ET device to light up a finger). It works by comparing the differences in red light, which is absorbed by oxygenated blood, and infrared light, which is absorbed by deoxygenated blood.  

In a large study just published in the journal Lancet (looking at over 230,000 newborns), simple pulse oximetry detected 76% of congenital heart defects, with only a rate of 0.14% false positive results. The risk of false positives was even lower than that when pulse ox was performed when the baby was over 24 hours of age. Pretty impressive! 

It has been estimated that about 280 infants with unrecognized CCHD are discharged from newborn nurseries each year. Congenital heart disease also accounts for somewhere between 3-  % of infant deaths. With early intervention and surgery the chance of survival from CCHD is greatly improved. 

So ask your pediatrician or obstetrician if they are doing routine pulse oximetry in your hospital nursery.

 

 

Daily Dose

Sleep & Your Baby

1.30 to read

How many books, manuals and even blogs are there out there on “getting your baby to sleep”.  There are even “coaches” for new parents who will help them “get their baby to sleep through the night.” 

The longer I practice the more I realize that every baby is different and it really doesn’t matter which book/blog you read....it takes some time to get a newborn to sleep through the night.  If you told expectant parents that it is “tough” in the beginning and sleepless nights are “normal”, most of us would have thought, “not me and my baby”.  Like many things you have to live it to learn.

Getting a baby to sleep through the night is not really an intellectual endeavor, which parenting is later in life. You can read books, talk to a coach, buy all sorts of gizmos and “sleep equipment”, but it also just takes time.  Some of you may just stop reading right now and go, NOT MY BABY!

A newborn baby does not enter this world knowing about circadian rhythms, or lengthy periods of sleep without eating.  A baby really only wants to eat and sleep.... and in the beginning, on their own schedule! Learning to sleep is like a lab in college, lots of hours in class with little credit.  

Of course I believe in things like, “Try to put your baby down to sleep when they are tired but not asleep and they will learn to quiet themselves”. “Try to keep your baby up a bit after their feeding during the day, rather than letting them go right back to sleep”. “Try to only feed your baby every 2-3 hours during the day which will help get them on a schedule”. There are a million other suggestions as well. The only one that I know I always adhere to is “Your new baby must only sleep on their back”, other than that, the first few weeks and even months learning to sleep is just practice, practice, practice. 

Yes, some babies are better sleepers than others, just like you will see some children are better readers while other are better athletes or artists. Some parents will have a baby that is sleeping 6-8 hours by 6-8 weeks and other parents will have to keep “practicing” with their baby for 3-4 months, everyone is different. 

But, do not start off feeling like a failure as a parent if your baby is not sleeping while your friend or co-worker’s child is. Parenting is not a competition and realizing this early on will make some parental struggles a bit easier to handle over the next 21 years. Your baby will learn to sleep...but like so many things, it takes time and practice. 

If I had the potion...trust me I would be selling it by now, there is not a new parent out there that would not buy it....just don’t think the FDA will approve the patent.

Daily Dose

Are Parents Too Connected?

1.30 to read

Has your spouse, babysitter or other child care provider ever called you to come home “because the baby is crying”?  It seems that technology, which is readily at our finger tips 24/7, has created yet another dilemma - what to do if a baby is crying? 

Pre-cell phone days, there really was not much to do if you the parent left home and your baby/child started crying.  Outside of calling the restaurant, store, movie theater (directly), and asking them to page a parent, most of us just muddled through a crying child.  I also think that in most cases, said child eventually stopped crying (unless there was an obvious reason that could be “fixed”) and by the time you the parent returned home, all was typically well.  

But now, with a cell phone in every hand, it only takes one call to summon the parent of a crying child.  I think this is a good news/bad news dilemma.  The good news is: parents may feel more comfortable leaving their child with a babysitter, knowing that they may be reached in the event of an emergency.  The bad news is:  is a baby or child who is only crying, typically an emergency?  Depends on your definition. 

The reason I bring this up is that I often hear young parents, and especially mothers, tell me that during the first several months of their infant’s life, they cannot leave the house for more than minutes, before being called home....because the baby is crying.  Some of these mothers are really “stressed out and exhausted” and need a bit of a get-away to “re-boot”. I am not talking about a trip to the day spa. I am simply talking about an hour or 2 to go to the store or meet a friend for lunch or just sit alone in the park and read a book.  Just a bit of quiet after being home with a baby day in and day out for the first 4 weeks of their newborn’s life.  If you have been there you understand. 

But, now that they have a cell phone, there is CONSTANT communication.  The minute the baby cries, the cell phone rings....”the baby is CRYING, come home.”  My husband would tell you that his best parenting started the first time I left him alone with our first son and I actually went away for the weekend.  (I believe the baby was 6 or 7 weeks old and off I went breast pump in hand to a reunion.)  No cell phones then, and guess what, he did a great job!!!!  He told me how after the first 24 hours he figured out that he really didn’t have to have the baby in the bathroom with him in order to take a shower. He later told me that the first shower he took, not only was our son in the room in his “bouncy” chair, but he left the shower door open as the door got steamy and he couldn’t see the baby!! How cute is that. 

Technology, as wonderful as it is, may also enable us to “cop out” when things get a bit difficult.  That goes for parenting as well. 

Turnoff your phone off sometime and let the “other parent” or babysitter handle it for awhile. Being disconnected is NOT always a bad thing!

Daily Dose

Foods You Can Eat When Breast Feeding

1.30

Should breast feeding moms avoid certain foods?I was making hospital rounds today and talking to all of the new moms (and dads) about their newborns.  I love talking to new parents about the importance of having healthy meals to support breast feeding! I even had a young dad asking “what foods should I avoid cooking for my wife while breast feeding?”  How cute is that! Can we clone him?!

After breast feeding my 3 children, I have decided that you can really eat whatever you want!  I know some people swear that certain foods you eat will cause a breast fed baby to have gas. But think about it, bottle fed babies and breast fed infants all have GAS!  None of the formulas contain broccoli, or cauliflower or beans or tomatoes and bottle fed babies have gas too. It is just a fact, newborn babies are gassy for the first several months as their digestive tracts mature. And yes, it is stinky too! So… I told this dad, “good for you for cooking for your wife.  Make her healthy, well balanced meals and throw in a few of her favorite foods.”  I would not change anything unless you can definitely correlate that a food ALWAYS makes your baby more uncomfortable (and that is so hard to keep track of). Eat what you want (in moderation) to be healthy and happy.  I have no data but feel certain that happier mothers must in some way have an effect on a  baby, so at least enjoy mealtime. When I had a colicky baby (previous post), I tried eating only broth and bland foods, and with me equally miserable and starving…this stressful situation only got worse. Final words, if I was going to try eliminating anything from my diet while breastfeeding to try and help “relieve “a gassy baby, it would be excessive dairy, as there has been some data on this. Remember, everything in moderation. I’m willing to bet that by the time your baby is 4 months old (the magic age) you are not even worried about what you are eating, as you are having too much fun laughing with your baby! What foods (if any) bothered your baby while breast feeding? I would love your comments.  Leave them below. That’s your daily dose for today. We’ll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

Vaccine Pain

1.00 to read

I am often reminded of the adage, “this is going to hurt me more than it hurts you” before beginning infant vaccinations. I can remember my own parents saying that to me before a spanking (the preferred discipline of my childhood) and that statement never made any sense to me until I too became a parent. 

As I discuss infant vaccinations with new parents, I somehow know that they are wishing they could “take the needles” for their own child. I really do believe that those first vaccines at 2 months of age “hurt the new parent, more than the infant”. It is an early parenting hurdle to get through those first immunizations and realize that your baby handled the vaccines without much ado and somehow the next set of vaccines at 4 and 6 months are a bit easier. Pain is not anything that a parent wants their child to endure, and if there is any way to mitigate the pain associated with immunizations I am all for it. 

Many parents come to my office prepared with sucrose to let their baby suck on during the immunizations.  I recently read an article in Pediatrics that showed the 5 S’s - swaddling, side/stomach positioning, shushing, swinging and sucking on a pacifier significantly reduced the pain associated with vaccines in 2 and 4 month old infants. In fact the 5S’s worked “substantially better to reduce post vaccination pain than sucrose alone”. 

So, if you are concerned about the pain associated with your infant’s vaccines, come ready to swaddle, shush, swing and let your baby have a pacifier as well. A little tummy time after the immunizations might be good medicine too. 

But more importantly, remember that by vaccinating your baby you are protecting them from disease for their entire childhood and into adolescence (when I am not sure the immunizations are any easier). 

The 5S’s seem like an easy solution for parent and baby, and a lollipop or ice cream cone goes a long way for pain relief in the 4-11 year old set as well. Vaccines are a moment of pain for a lifetime of gain for sure!

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

When parents head back into the dating scene.

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.