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Special Baby Formulas Don’t Prevent Asthma, Allergies

2:00

Parents that have a baby at risk or allergies, asthma or type-1 Diabetes sometimes turn to hydrolyzed milk formulas in hopes of lowering their infant’s risk of developing these problems.

A new review of the data on hydrolyzed formulas finds that there is no evidence that they actually protect children from these types of autoimmune disorders.

"We found no consistent evidence to support a protective role for partially or extensively hydrolyzed formula," concluded a team led by Robert Boyle of Imperial College London in England.

"Our findings conflict with current international guidelines, in which hydrolyzed formula is widely recommended for young formula-fed infants with a family history of allergic disease," the study authors added.

In the study, Boyle's team looked at data from 37 studies that together included more than 19,000 participants and were conducted between 1946 and 2015.

The investigators found that infants who received hydrolyzed cow's milk formula did not have a lower risk of asthma, allergies (such as eczema, hay fever, food allergies) or type 1 diabetes compared to those who received human breast milk or a standard cow's milk formula.

The researchers also found no evidence to support an FDA-approved claim that a partially hydrolyzed formula could reduce the risk of the skin disorder eczema, or another conclusion that hydrolyzed formula could prevent an allergy to cow's milk.

Other experts in the United States said that the finding casts doubt on the usefulness of these kinds of specialized products.

"Allergies and autoimmune diseases [such as asthma, and type 1 diabetes] are on the rise and it would be nice if we did have a clear route to preventing them," said Dr. Ron Marino, associate chair of pediatrics at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y.

"Unfortunately, despite U.S. Food and Drug Administration support [for hydrolyzed formula], the data are not compelling," he said.

Dr. Punita Ponda is assistant chief of allergy and immunology at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y. She stressed that when it comes to infant feeding, breast milk is by far the healthiest option.

However, "current mainstream guidelines for infant formula do recommend that parents consider using hypoallergenic formula if a close family member -- like an older brother or sister -- has a food allergy," she said. That was based on prior studies supporting some kind of protective effect, Ponda said.

Protein hydrolysate formulas were first introduced in the 1940s for babies who could not tolerate the milk protein in cow’s milk.

Protein hydrolyzed formulas are formulas composed of proteins that are partially broken down or “hydrolyzed.” They are also called hydrolysates.

There are two broad categories of protein hydrolysates:

•       Partially hydrolyzed formulas (pHF)

•       Extensively hydrolyzed formulas (eHF)

Both partially and extensively hydrolyzed protein formulas are based on casein or whey, which are proteins found in milk.  

Hydrolyzed formulas have had the protein chains broken down into shorter and more easy-to -digest chains. The more extensively hydrolyzed the formula, the fewer potentially allergenic compounds remain.

Hydrolyzed formulas are also more expensive than regular cow’s milk formulas and often harder to find.

The researchers review was published March 08, 2016 in the BMJ.

Story sources: Robert Preidt, http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/news/20160308/special-infant-formulas-dont-shield-against-asthma-allergies-study

Victoria Groce, http://foodallergies.about.com/od/adultfoodallergies/p/hypoallergenic.htm

 

Daily Dose

Feeding Your Baby

1:30 to read

Under the heading of “learning new things everyday” comes some information on feeding your infant. Have you heard of “paced bottle feeding?”  If you are a new mother and are breastfeeding and either supplementing your baby with formula or breast milk you may already be doing this……

 

There are many advantages and benefits to breastfeeding your baby, but not everyone is able to breast feed or desires to breast feed. While I am a huge advocate for breast feeding, I am also supportive of “ a mother’s right to choose” and have some patients who just prefer to bottle feed their baby with formula.  The most important issue is really about nutrition and healthy weight gain for a newborn…with either breast or bottle feeding. 

 

So…a new mother was telling me that she was using “paced feeding” for her baby. I admit I looked at her and said “what”?  It seems that this is a feeding method used when a breast fed infant takes a bottle. It is supposed to more closely mimic the sucking and swallowing pattern of an infant when they breast feed.

 

With paced feeding the infant is held in an upright position and the bottle is held horizontally and the baby is  paused after feeding every few minutes…which is what typically occurs during breast feeding.  This method also encourages the  caregiver to turn the baby from one side to the other midway through the feeding….again like a breast fed infant. This will encourage eye contact and changing the head and neck position of the infant during their bottle.

 

Paced feeding is also supposed to help the baby not over-eat. By pausing “you are letting the cues for being full reach the baby’s brain.”  Mothers have also told me “paced feeding will not stretch a baby’s stomach.” I am not sure that there is science supporting this…and I do feel that in general most babies will not overeat ….they pause and turn away from the bottle as they get full…whether you breast or bottle feed you will notice that your baby really “leads the feeding”. When parents try to “fill their baby up before bedtime” they almost seem to try and force feed the baby and typically that only leads to a cranky baby that might spit up as well….watch your baby’s cues.  Amount fed does not necessarily correlate with longer sleep!

 

Try this and see what you think….again, I don’t think there is truly one way to feed every baby as they are individuals too and you will figure out what works best for your own baby. I think most babies are “pacing themselves” even without you realizing it…

 

Daily Dose

The Difference Between Cradle Cap And Dandruff

1.15 to read

I recently received a question from a Twitter follower related to cradle cap and dandruff. She wanted to know if there was a difference in the two.

You know there really isn’t as they are both due to seborrheic dermatitis, an inflammatory condition of the skin in which the skin overproduces skin cells and sebum (the skins natural oil). Cradle cap is the term used for the scaly dermatitis seen on the scalp in infants. It is also seen on the eyelids, eyebrows, and behind the ears. It is typically seen after about three months of age and will often resolve on its own by the time a baby is eight to 12 months old. It is usually simply a “cosmetic” problem for a baby as it looks like a yellowish plaque on a baby’s scalp and is often not even noticed by anyone other than the parents. Unlike seborrheic dermatitis in adults, cradle cap typically doesn’t itch. It is thought that cradle cap may occur in infancy due to hormonal influences from the mother that were passed across the placenta to the baby. These hormones cause the sebaceous glands to become over active. In some severe cases an infant’s scalp becomes really scaly and inflamed and causes even more parental concern, as it appears that the infant is uncomfortable and may be trying to scratch their head by rubbing it on surfaces. The treatment for cradle cap is to wash the baby’s scalp daily with a mild shampoo and then to use a soft comb or brush to help remove the scales once they have been loosened with washing. When washing the head make sure to get the shampoo behind the ears and in the brows (keeping the soap out of baby’s eyes). This is usually sufficient treatment for most cradle cap. In situations where the greasy scales seem to be worsening it may help to put a small amount of mineral oil or olive oil on the baby’s head and let it sit (I left a small amount on my children’s heads overnight) and then to shampoo the following day. The oil will help the scales to loosen up and come off more easily. For babies that have very inflamed irritated cradle cap a visit to your pediatrician may be warranted to confirm the diagnosis. In persistent cases I often recommend shampooing several times a week with a dandruff shampoo that has either selenium (Selsun) or zinc pyrithione (Head and Shoulders) making sure not to get any in the infant’s eyes. I may then also use a hydrocortisone cream or foam on the scalp that will lessen the inflammation and itching. In these cases it may take several weeks to totally clear up the problem. As children get older, especially during puberty, you may see a return of seborrhea as dandruff. Again you can use dandruff shampoos. It also seems that with the overproduction of sebum there is an overgrowth of a fungus called “malessizia” so using a shampoo for dandruff as well as a antifungal shampoo (Nizoral) often works. I have teens alternate different shampoos, as sometimes it seems to work better than always using the same shampoo for months on end. Teens don’t like white flakes falling from their scalp and unlike a baby, a teen is worried about the cosmetic issues of seborrhea! That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

What New Babies Need

1:30 to read

I have many friends whose own children are now having babies and they always ask, “what all do we need to have/buy for a new baby these days?”  While many things have changed since I had my own children, many have not,  and I still think “less is more” is a good adage to follow, especially for a newborn.  We all have a tendency to buy too much, or the “latest and greatest” only to find out that it is not necessary.

Carseat - a rear facing car seat is a must for your newborn!!!  Look at all of the reviews on line and pick which seat works best for you.  Do you want one with a base that you can also clip on to a stroller?  Remember your baby will sit in a rear facing car seat until 2 years. This is one item I would spend my money on!!

The baby needs a place to sleep so buy a crib and a good mattress.  If you are going to have more than one baby I would buy something that will last through several children. I like having a crib (rather than a toddler bed), as your baby will be in the crib for several years and then can move to a regular bed…no need for an “in between”.  Do not use an “old” crib that has drop sides, due to safety concerns. So that means the one that I had kept in the garage (from my kids) was a throw away! I usually move the first child to a bed when I need the crib for the next baby…no specific age. Bumpers are no longer recommended, so that saves money too!

Changing table or dresser for the millions of diaper changes.  It is so helpful to not have to bend over each time. I would also buy a diaper cream (Dr. Smiths, Destin or Butt paste) to have on hand….your baby will probably get a diaper rash at some time during their time in a diaper.

Baby bath tub: while you can bathe your baby in the sink, the newer bathtubs do make it easier for a newborn and you can use it in the tub as well until your baby can sit up alone. Remember, you will NEVER leave your child in the tub alone…even with all of the seats, rings and things  that they sell to support your baby!!  For bathing I like gentle bath wash like Cetaphil, Cerave, and Eucerin products….good for all skin types.  Pick one!

Swaddle blankets: WOW there are a million on the market and they all “claim” to help your baby to sleep better. I don’t think any of the products say “it will also takes weeks to months for your baby to sleep through the night” , no matter what you use.  I do like the thin swaddle blankets as they are useful for a number of things besides swaddling. Once you have your baby have the nurses show you how to swaddle (quick and easy).  The Miracle Blanket, Woombie and Halo also make it easy to swaddle as well. Pick one (or two) and stick with that.  Remember, your baby is going to be put in their crib on their back whether swaddled or not!! NO TUMMY SLEEPING.  

Diaper Bag: again their are a million out there in all shapes, sizes and price points. In the beginning you need to have a pad for changing (you will end up changing that baby all sorts of weird places), diapers, burp clothes, wipes…as your baby gets bigger you will have bottles, cups, toys all shoved in there too. All of my patients seem to have a travel size Purell strapped to the side of the bag as well. I would get a bag that you can wipe out as there will be spills of all sorts of stuff in that bag I assure you!  Somehow, over time you go back to “less is more” and the diapers end up in your purse!!  

So…that is a start. Will do another post on some other products in the future. 

 

 

Daily Dose

"White Noise" and Babies

1.00 to read

I received an email from Meredith (via our iPhone app) because she had heard that “white noise” might cause a child to have speech/language delays. She used a sound machine in her children’s rooms at night, and was concerned about the possibility of “interfering with their speech”.

So, I did a little research and found an article from the journal Science in 2003.  A study from the University of CA at San Francisco (UCSF) actually looked at baby rats who listened to “white noise” for prolonged periods of time. The researchers found that the part of the auditory cortex (in rats) that is responsible for hearing, did not develop properly after listening to the “white noise”.   

Interestingly, when the “white noise” was taken away, the brain resumed normal development. Again, this study was in baby rats, and to my knowledge has not been duplicated.  But, these baby rats were exposed to hours on end of  "white noise” which may not be the same thing as sleeping with a “sound machine” at night. 

We might need to be more concerned about background “white noise”. We do know that babies learn language by listening and absorbing human speech. They need to hear their parent’s talking to them from the time they are born.  They listen to not only their parent’s speech, but also to siblings, grandparents etc. and from an early age respond to that language by making cooing sounds themselves, often imitating the sounds they have heard. They are also exposed to a great deal of “white noise” or background noise with the televisions being on, computers, telephones, vacuum cleaners, lawn mowers etc. going on all day.  The “white noise” that may be reduced by turning off televisions, videos, computers etc and replacing that background noise with human speech through reading, singing and just talking to your baby and child could only be beneficial. One might surmise that “white noise” in the form of a sound machine at night would not affect a child’s speech development, as this is not a time for language acquisition.

Having a good bedtime routine, reading to your child before bed, or singing them a lullaby will encourage language development, and the sound machine may ensure a good night’s sleep.  Just turn it off in the morning!

That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again tomorrow. 

Daily Dose

How To Prevents SIDS

1:15 to read

A new study on swaddling and sudden infant death (SIDS) was just published this week in the journal Pediatrics. Not surprisingly, it found that infants who were swaddled and placed on their sides or stomach had a higher incidence of SIDS. It has been routinely recommended for more than 15 years that all babies sleep on their backs and since that time the incidence of SIDS has been dramatically reduced.  Unfortunately not everyone follows the AAP recommendation. 

While it has been known that tummy sleeping has been associated with SIDS this meta analysis looked at data which was gathered over two decades and from 3 different global sites. The review found that infants who were swaddled and placed on their sides were almost twice as likely to experience SIDS and the risk of SIDS did double in those babies who were swaddled and placed on their stomachs.  

I discuss swaddling with all of my patients as there are so many different swaddle blankets available.  Actually, one of the first things a newborn nurse seems to teach a new parent is how to swaddle their baby.  While swaddling has been promoted to aid in calming a newborn as well as to help their sleep, the recommendation that the baby be placed on their back in their crib continues..  Many a baby looks like a little burrito….. rolled up in the swaddle and then being placed on their back in the crib.

But is seems from this study that some babies were being swaddled and then placed on their side to sleep. Unfortunately, even a newborn may squirm enough that they then move from their side into the prone position.  Older infants who are swaddled may actually roll from their back to their tummies, even while swaddled. While the association between swaddling and SIDS remains unclear, I think this is a good reason to start getting a baby out of a swaddle once they are rolling. So around the 3 month mark I start having parents loosen the swaddle and try to just lay the baby on their back without being swaddled.

Let me re-iterate, this article does not confirm an association between swaddling and SIDS.  I do think it is a good reminder for putting a baby, “back to sleep” and once they are rolling “ditching” the swaddle seems to make even more sense. Once less thing to worry about, right?

 

Daily Dose

Amber Beads for Teething?

1:30 to read

What is the deal with these amber teething beads?? Suddenly so many of “my” babies are wearing these little necklaces, which are “supposed” to help with teething. I worry they are a choking hazard and I have no clue why they would help a baby get their teeth?

I have previously written about teething and the many thoughts and/or “myths” surrounding babies and tooth eruption. A baby typically gets their first tooth around 6 months of age, and they are usually the lower 2 central incisors.  But, some babies will get teeth a bit earlier and some babies will not get a tooth until 15-18 months of age. The latest age that I have seen for a first tooth to come in was 22 months, and yes that child is totally normal and has all of their teeth!

Teething gets a bad rap for causing any fussiness in an infant once the baby reaches 4 months of age.  Whether the baby is fussy day or night, it is often attributed to teeth ( prior to this age it is “gas”). But, while many babies are drooling and putting their hands in their mouth and chewing on toys, it is probably actually due to development of hand to mouth coordination rather than tooth eruption.  A baby becomes really fixated orally around this age...and this stage last until they are about 24 months...you will see, everything goes straight to their mouth!

I am sure I remember my first child’s “teething” but I am also sure I could not begin to tell you when the 3rd son got his first tooth.  My middle son was the “crankiest baby/toddler” on the planet (he is a gem now) and he did not get a tooth until he was about 15 months old, and promptly knocked out his upper middle tooth around 2!   Don’t remember pain with teeth coming in or out?!?

So, back to the amber beads...I think they are a bit like essential oils...not sure what they really do. I also worry that a baby might get tangles up in the necklace and get asphyxiated...even though they are supposed to break apart. I would NOT take the risk. 

Lastly, you don’t see 5-6 year olds wearing amber beads as they lose their teeth and get their first permanent teeth. You also don’t hear a parent make excuses for a cranky/tired elementary school aged child....”she is just behaving like this because she is teething”, sounds a bit crazy right?

We parents like to have reasons for everything...and I don’t care if you blame teeth for making a baby fussy...I am just not sure there really is a correlation and certainly not for month after month...as a child gets 20 teeth in the first 2-3 years of life.   

Daily Dose

Flying With A Baby

1:15 to read

Overheard on the plane this week:  I am in row 15 and there is the cutest most precious 4-5 month old baby girl behind me in row 16.  Key point….she is sleeping as we are making our approach!

 

The mother of the baby is traveling with her mother so there are is a grandmother along to dote on this darling baby. The mother of the baby says to her mother…”we need to wake her up now!!!”  “Mom, please wake her up as we need to feed her NOW!”  At this point the mother takes out a whisk of some sort to put into the breast milk…do you have to mix with a whisk now?

 

So…of course they wake up the baby who starts to cry, but just a bit…and then the grandmother starts to feed the baby the bottle.  The mother is saying, “Mom, just make her eat”.  Now it is really bumpy as we are getting ready to land and I was wishing I had a bottle to calm me too!

 

The baby seems to be quietly eating, but then must have stopped eating as now the mother of the baby takes the baby from the grandmother and starts to try to give her daughter the bottle.  She starts talking to the baby saying, “ please keep eating so your ears will stay clear” followed by “Mommy is going to drink the bottle, so you can see me keeping my ears clear too”.  “If you keep sucking your ears will be pain free”. 

 

Everything seems to be going well…although we still have not landed, when the mother says “I am going to force feed you to keep your ears clear!”  Uh…oh I am thinking, I know where this may be going.  But it seems so far, so good. 

 

Just as we are about to touch down I hear this gurgling noise from behind me and then the mother saying, “Oh dear she is spitting up!!”   Really, are you shocked??

 

But…I must say, the baby was quiet and content…who knows, I would have never awakened that sweet baby girl, but then again, I still believe, “never wake a sleeping baby”, even on an airplane.

 

 

 

Daily Dose

Baby Bling Can Be Dangerous!

1.15 to read

I recently saw a TV segment on “blinging” your baby and toddler. It seems that the latest craze is decking out not only little girls, but also little boys. Being the mother of three sons I can understand wanting to “dress up” boys as well (little boy clothes can be a bit boring) but a few of the models on TV were wearing necklaces. 

Now, a boy wearing a necklace doesn’t bother me at all, but a baby or toddler with a necklace worries me!  This isn’t about gender, rather about safety.  

A necklace is a real choking and strangling danger for babies and young children. I know that many parents receive necklaces for their babies on the occasion of a baptism and in some cultures an infant is given a necklace made of string or beads to wear soon after birth. 

But, whenever a baby comes into my office with a necklace on I discuss the possibility, even if remote, of the child suffocating if the necklace gets caught or twisted around the child’s neck. There is no reason to even risk it! 

Baby bling is great if you want to put your child in cute shirts, hats, or even trendy jeans. Go for it!  But I would never put a necklace on a child. It is akin to the adage about peanuts...when should a child be allowed to eat peanuts?  When they can spell the word!  

We pediatricians are no longer worried about peanut allergies in the young child, it is the choking hazard that is the real concern. It’s the same for a necklace. Let your child wear it when they can spell the word, or put it on when your 3 year old plays dress up, but take it off once finished. There is no need to ever have a young child sleep in anything like a necklace, or anything that has a cord until they are much older. 

Children ages 4 and under, and especially those under the age of 1 year, are at the greatest risk for airway obstruction and suffocation.  So, put the necklace back in the jewelry box for awhile. You can re-wrap for re-gifting and re-wearing at a later date. Safety before bling! 

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