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Your Baby

Britax Recalls Car Seat Chest Clips Due to Infant Choking Hazard

1:30

Faulty chest clips on more than 100 models of Britax Care Safety car seats are being voluntarily recalled because the clips could break off and create a choking hazard for infants.

The company says that no injuries have been reported, but it has received complaints of chest clips breaking.

The recall will affect more than 200,000 car seats. However, Britax stresses that the car seats are still safe to use until a replacement kit is obtained. 

The chest clip is on the Britax B-Safe 35, B-Safe 35 Elite, and BOB B-Safe 35 infant seats.

The products were manufactured between Nov. 1, 2015, and May 31, 2017. To see the model numbers that are included in the voluntary recall, or to check the serial number of your seat, visit the company’s website set up for this recall at www.bsafe35clip.com. You can find the serial numbers on the "Date of Manufacture" label on the lower frame of the seat.

Britax is offering to replace the chest clip with a free kit that contains a new clip made from a different material. The kit comes with step-by-step instructions for replacement. Consumers are advised to routinely check their current chest clip until a replacement arrives.

Story sources: Alexandria McIntire, http://www.webmd.com/children/news/20170623/recall-britax-car-seat-chest-clip

Ashlee Kieler, https://consumerist.com/2017/06/21/britax-recalls-207000-carseats-over-chest-clips-that-can-break/

Daily Dose

Lead Found in Baby Food

1:30 to read

I know many of the parents of the children I care for are concerned about the latest news from the Environmental Defense Fund which showed that about 20% of baby food samples tested over a 10 year period had detectable levels of lead.

 

This non profit group looked at data that the FDA had collected from 2003-2013 which included 2,164 baby food samples. While none of the baby food samples seemed to exceed the FDA’s “allowable” levels of lead, it is still quite concerning. At the same time the FDA is in the process of reviewing their standards to reflect the latest science surrounding the potential risks to young children who are exposed to lead.  

 

While lead testing is routinely performed in young children (1 and 2 yrs), the CDC currently  considers a blood lead level greater than 5 micrograms/deciliter as elevated, but no lead level is “safe”. 

 

Lead exposure has been shown to have neurocognitive effects - which means IQ, the ability to pay attention and academic achievement…and the effects cannot be corrected.

 

The study did not name baby foods by brand.  Root vegetables (carrots are one) had the highest rate of lead detection (65% of samples), followed by crackers and cookies (47%) and the then fruits and juices (29%). Only 4% of the cereal samples contained lead.

 

This report will cause a lot of parental anxiety, but really doesn’t tell us much about what to do?  Lead based paint is still the number one source of lead exposure, followed by water, which may also have contributed to lead in food…. but there is still lots of be determined.

 

In the meantime, the take home message is “feed your babies and toddlers a wide variety of baby foods” and when possible eat fresh foods. One hypothesis is that baby foods are more processed which may contribute to the higher lead content.  It is easy to cook and “mush” up your own food to feed your baby and it really does not require a fancy food processor.  If you can mush it your baby can eat it!!! The only concern about the introduction of food is basically it has to be soft enough not to be a choking hazard. So no whole nuts, chunks of meat, uncooked hard veggies…you get the idea.

 

Just because your baby doesn’t seem to like certain foods, don’t get stuck feeding them just a few foods…but continue to offer a variety of healthy foods..some of which they may eat more of than others. Every day will be different.

 

So…don’t go throw away all of your baby foods but think if you might be able to substitute fresh foods, don’t offer fruit juices to your babies and toddlers and most importantly eat healthy foods. That’s the best thing for you and your child.  

Daily Dose

Brown Spots on Your Baby?

1:30 to read

I was examining a 4 month old baby the other day when I noticed that she had several light brown spots on her skin. When I asked the mother how long they had been there, she noted that she had started seeing them in the last month or so, or maybe a couple even before that.  She then started to point a few out to me on both her infant’s arm, leg and on her back.

These “caramel colored” flat spots are called cafe au lait macules, (CALMs) and are relatively common. They occur in up to 3% of infants and about 25% of children.  They occur in both males and females and are more common in children of color.  While children may have a few CALMs, more than 3 CALMS are found in only 0.2 to 0.3% of children who otherwise do not have any evidence of an underlying disorder.  

Of course this mother had googled brown spots in a baby and was worried that her baby had neurofibromatosis (NF).  She started pointing out every little speckle or spot on her precious blue eyed daughter’s skin, some of which I couldn’t even see with my glasses on. I knew she was concerned and I had to quickly remember some of the findings of NF type 1.

Cafe au lait spots in NF-1 occur randomly on the body and are anywhere from 5mm to 30 mm in diameter. They are brown in color and have a smooth border, referred to as “the coast of California”. In order to make the suspected diagnosis of NF-1 a child needs to have 6 or more cafe au lait spots before puberty, and most will present by 6 -8 years of age.

For children who present for a routine exam with several CALMs ( like this infant), the recommendation is simply to follow and look for the development of more cafe au lait macules. That is a hard prescription for a parents…watch and wait, but unfortunately that is often what parenting is about.

Neurofibromatosis - 1 is an autosomal disorder which involves a mutation on chromosome 17 and may affect numerous organ systems including not only skin, but eyes, bones, blood vessels and the nervous system. Half of patients inherit the mutation while another half have no known family history.  NF-1 may also be associated with neurocognitive deficits and of course this causes a great deal of parental concern. About 40% of children with NF-1 will have a learning disability ( some minor, others more severe).

For a child who has multiple CALMs it is recommended that they be seen by an ophthalmologist and a dermatologist yearly,  as well as being followed by their pediatrician.  If criteria for NF-1 is not met by the time a child is 10 years of age,  it is less likely that they will be affected, despite having more than 6 CALMs.

The biggest issue is truly the parental anxiety of watching for more cafe au lait spots and trying to remain CALM…easier said than done for anyone who is a parent. 

Daily Dose

What New Babies Need

1:30 to read

I have many friends whose own children are now having babies and they always ask, “what all do we need to have/buy for a new baby these days?”  While many things have changed since I had my own children, many have not,  and I still think “less is more” is a good adage to follow, especially for a newborn.  We all have a tendency to buy too much, or the “latest and greatest” only to find out that it is not necessary.

Carseat - a rear facing car seat is a must for your newborn!!!  Look at all of the reviews on line and pick which seat works best for you.  Do you want one with a base that you can also clip on to a stroller?  Remember your baby will sit in a rear facing car seat until 2 years. This is one item I would spend my money on!!

The baby needs a place to sleep so buy a crib and a good mattress.  If you are going to have more than one baby I would buy something that will last through several children. I like having a crib (rather than a toddler bed), as your baby will be in the crib for several years and then can move to a regular bed…no need for an “in between”.  Do not use an “old” crib that has drop sides, due to safety concerns. So that means the one that I had kept in the garage (from my kids) was a throw away! I usually move the first child to a bed when I need the crib for the next baby…no specific age. Bumpers are no longer recommended, so that saves money too!

Changing table or dresser for the millions of diaper changes.  It is so helpful to not have to bend over each time. I would also buy a diaper cream (Dr. Smiths, Destin or Butt paste) to have on hand….your baby will probably get a diaper rash at some time during their time in a diaper.

Baby bath tub: while you can bathe your baby in the sink, the newer bathtubs do make it easier for a newborn and you can use it in the tub as well until your baby can sit up alone. Remember, you will NEVER leave your child in the tub alone…even with all of the seats, rings and things  that they sell to support your baby!!  For bathing I like gentle bath wash like Cetaphil, Cerave, and Eucerin products….good for all skin types.  Pick one!

Swaddle blankets: WOW there are a million on the market and they all “claim” to help your baby to sleep better. I don’t think any of the products say “it will also takes weeks to months for your baby to sleep through the night” , no matter what you use.  I do like the thin swaddle blankets as they are useful for a number of things besides swaddling. Once you have your baby have the nurses show you how to swaddle (quick and easy).  The Miracle Blanket, Woombie and Halo also make it easy to swaddle as well. Pick one (or two) and stick with that.  Remember, your baby is going to be put in their crib on their back whether swaddled or not!! NO TUMMY SLEEPING.  

Diaper Bag: again their are a million out there in all shapes, sizes and price points. In the beginning you need to have a pad for changing (you will end up changing that baby all sorts of weird places), diapers, burp clothes, wipes…as your baby gets bigger you will have bottles, cups, toys all shoved in there too. All of my patients seem to have a travel size Purell strapped to the side of the bag as well. I would get a bag that you can wipe out as there will be spills of all sorts of stuff in that bag I assure you!  Somehow, over time you go back to “less is more” and the diapers end up in your purse!!  

So…that is a start. Will do another post on some other products in the future. 

 

 

Daily Dose

Fussy Babies

1:30 to read

I have written a lot about fussy infants, spitting up and gastro-esophageal reflux (GERD). The diagnosis of GERD in infants in the past 10 - 15 years has soared….especially in irritable infants some of whom arch their backs and act as if they are uncomfortable while feeding (both breast and bottle fed babies) and spit up frequently,  to those who are diagnosed with “silent reflux”. 

 

When new drugs came to the market for adults with GERD, initially H-2 blockers like Zantac (ranitidine), Pepcid (famotidine) and Axid (nizatidine) they were soon prescribed for children as well. These drugs were followed by the introduction of proton pump inhibitors (PPI) which also inhibit gastric acid production, and include Prevacid (lasoprazole), Nexium (esomeprazole), and Prilosec (omeprazole).  Suddenly, younger and younger children were being placed on either H-2 blockers or PPI’s and many of these prescriptions were being written for infants under 6 months of age.

 

Being a pediatrician who had practiced for a long time and also had a incredibly fussy, irritable and colicky baby myself….I could never really decide if these drugs worked well or if “we” wanted them to work. There were some cases where it was quickly evident that the baby’s symptoms improved, while in many others the parents “were not sure”.  But, the use of these drugs has soared.

 

I have more and more young parents who want to start medication within their baby’s first month of life…”just because they are fussy”.  But there are new studies showing that the use of these medications in young children, especially those under one year, may have lasting side effects including an increased risk of fractures. In a retrospective study looking at over 850,000 children born between 2001-2013, those prescribed PPI’s had a 23% increased risk of fractures and those prescribed H2 blockers had a 13% increased risk while those prescribed combination therapy had a 32% increased risk of fractures. The risk also increased if children took these medications before 6 months of age, and there was also increased risk for those who used medications for longer periods of time.

 

Take home message for both doctors and parents….if these drugs need to be used it is preferable to limit it to one type, preferably H2 blockers and for the shortest amount of time possible. The use of other remedies including herbal remedies, thickening of feeds and probiotics should be first line treatment. When symptoms persist or are worsening and GERD is suspected, a 2 week trial of medication may be considered with ongoing discussion as to improvement in symptoms. Use the lowest dose for the shortest period of time as well.

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Daily Dose

Hassle-Free Formula?

1:15 to read

I am certainly a big proponent of “hassle free” options for making parenting easier. ( is there such a thing)?   For many of the families I see with new babies, the latest “favorite” gizmo is an automatic baby formula maker. Yes, it is similar to the Keurig and Nespresso coffee machines  but in this case it “mixes the formula powder and water to perfect consistency”…according to one manufacturer label.

 

When I first saw one in use I agreed that it seemed to be “easy”, but at the same time, I was not sure it was any  faster than just putting a scoop of baby formula in a bottle and shaking it up?  It certainly took up more counter space….but whatever right?  I was told…” you don’t have to mix or measure and there are no air bubbles like shaking a bottle”. Old school vs new school - the end product is the same, correct??

 

Well, as with many things, “hassle free” may not always mean better.

 

I recently saw an infant who had been doing well and gaining weight while breastfeeding. Her mother returned to work and decided to start formula feeding and purchased one of the new “instant formula preparation machines”. She was making the baby’s bottles “hassle free” every feeding.  The baby was under 4 months of age, so she was only receiving formula for feedings.

 

When the baby came in for the next check up she had not been gaining weight and had actually fallen off of her growth curve.  When the mother was asked if the baby was eating well, pooping, sleeping etc. all sounded fine. The baby’s physical exam was also normal.  So….why is this baby not gaining weight? The differential diagnosis is fairly long, but includes some serious problems. Pediatricians do not like to see a baby that is not gaining weight - the term used is “failure to thrive”.

 

So, very long story short…the good news is that the baby is fine!!! It turns out that the baby does not have any underlying problems. The problem was the automatic formula maker that the mother was using to prepare the baby’s bottles. For some unknown reason ( technology ) it was not adding the correct amount of formula to mix and make the 6 ounce bottle.  In other words…machine error!  The baby was actually getting diluted formula….and no one knew.

 

Once she started measuring and mixing her bottles the “old fashioned way” - scoop, add water and shake…the baby started to gain weight again.  Mystery solved, healthy baby and no more worried parents…but the “hassle free machine” led to a lot of anxiety. All is well, but I hope they got their money and more counter space back!

Daily Dose

Baby's First Foods

1:30 to read

Have you heard of “baby led weaning” (BLW)? Many of my patients who have infants that are ready to start “solid foods”, also called complementary foods, have questions about this method. Most babies begin eating foods along with breast milk or formula somewhere around 5 - 6 months of age.  So BLW is not really “weaning”,  as your infant will continue to have breast milk or formula in conjunction with foods…so this really should more aptly be named “baby self feeding”. 

In this method you never offer your baby “mush” or pureed foods, but rather offer them foods from the table.   While I am a huge advocate of self feeding (old term is finger feeding), I also think that early on offering a baby “mushy” food on a spoon is an important milestone. In fact, for most babies at 5 -6 months, it is difficult to pick up a small piece of food to self feed as the pincer grasp has not developed. So, a baby is trying to get food to their mouths by cupping it or hoping it sticks to their hand while pushing pieces around their tray. Some parents will put the food into their baby’s hand.  But, by 8-ish months most babies have developed their pincer grasp and the finger feeding should be preferred.  

Parents are also concerned about starting solid foods and the possibility of choking.  I am always discussing how to make sure that your child avoids choking hazards with foods. In other words, no whole grapes, or hot dogs, or popcorn or chunks of meat.   Other hazards are raw carrots, apples, celery and any “hard” food that your baby might be able to bite a chunk of and then choke. But, if you cook the carrots and then cut them in small bites they are easily handled by a baby who is self feeding.  It is really all about the consistency of the food as once your baby has lower teeth they can easily bite/pry off a big “chunk” of food that could lead to a choking hazard.

Interestingly, there was a recent study that looked at the incidence of choking in children who started with self feeding vs those fed traditionally with pureed foods from a spoon. In this study of about 200 children between 6 - 8 months of age the incidence of choking was similar, while there were more gagging events in the BLW group.  Fortunately, “the choking events resolved on their own”. Gagging is quite different than choking. Some children will gag on pureed foods just due to texture issues. 

I am an advocate of what I am going to call parent led feeding followed by early self feeding of appropriate foods. By the time a child is 9 months of age they should be able to finger feeding the majority of their meals. But there are some foods that are just not conducive to finger feeding at all….yogurt, apple sauce, puddings…and they will be spoon fed until your child is capable of using a spoon which is anywhere from 12 -18 months.   But as a reminder, whenever you offer your child a finger food you should remember two things, #1 is the piece small enough that my child cannot choke and #2 is the food cooked well enough to not pose a choking hazard.  

Several years ago there was a 1 year old in our practice who was given a piece of an apple to chew on… she bit off a chunk of the apple, aspirated and died. It was a terrible accident.  I will never forget that….and re-iterate to all of my patients…a pork chop, or chicken leg or any number of foods can become a choking hazard if your child bites off a chunk. Children really don’t chew until they are around 2 years, they just bite and try to swallow so I pay a great deal of attention to what foods they are offered.

Old school and new school…the combo seems to make sense to me. 

Your Baby

Special Baby Formulas Don’t Prevent Asthma, Allergies

2:00

Parents that have a baby at risk or allergies, asthma or type-1 Diabetes sometimes turn to hydrolyzed milk formulas in hopes of lowering their infant’s risk of developing these problems.

A new review of the data on hydrolyzed formulas finds that there is no evidence that they actually protect children from these types of autoimmune disorders.

"We found no consistent evidence to support a protective role for partially or extensively hydrolyzed formula," concluded a team led by Robert Boyle of Imperial College London in England.

"Our findings conflict with current international guidelines, in which hydrolyzed formula is widely recommended for young formula-fed infants with a family history of allergic disease," the study authors added.

In the study, Boyle's team looked at data from 37 studies that together included more than 19,000 participants and were conducted between 1946 and 2015.

The investigators found that infants who received hydrolyzed cow's milk formula did not have a lower risk of asthma, allergies (such as eczema, hay fever, food allergies) or type 1 diabetes compared to those who received human breast milk or a standard cow's milk formula.

The researchers also found no evidence to support an FDA-approved claim that a partially hydrolyzed formula could reduce the risk of the skin disorder eczema, or another conclusion that hydrolyzed formula could prevent an allergy to cow's milk.

Other experts in the United States said that the finding casts doubt on the usefulness of these kinds of specialized products.

"Allergies and autoimmune diseases [such as asthma, and type 1 diabetes] are on the rise and it would be nice if we did have a clear route to preventing them," said Dr. Ron Marino, associate chair of pediatrics at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N.Y.

"Unfortunately, despite U.S. Food and Drug Administration support [for hydrolyzed formula], the data are not compelling," he said.

Dr. Punita Ponda is assistant chief of allergy and immunology at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y. She stressed that when it comes to infant feeding, breast milk is by far the healthiest option.

However, "current mainstream guidelines for infant formula do recommend that parents consider using hypoallergenic formula if a close family member -- like an older brother or sister -- has a food allergy," she said. That was based on prior studies supporting some kind of protective effect, Ponda said.

Protein hydrolysate formulas were first introduced in the 1940s for babies who could not tolerate the milk protein in cow’s milk.

Protein hydrolyzed formulas are formulas composed of proteins that are partially broken down or “hydrolyzed.” They are also called hydrolysates.

There are two broad categories of protein hydrolysates:

•       Partially hydrolyzed formulas (pHF)

•       Extensively hydrolyzed formulas (eHF)

Both partially and extensively hydrolyzed protein formulas are based on casein or whey, which are proteins found in milk.  

Hydrolyzed formulas have had the protein chains broken down into shorter and more easy-to -digest chains. The more extensively hydrolyzed the formula, the fewer potentially allergenic compounds remain.

Hydrolyzed formulas are also more expensive than regular cow’s milk formulas and often harder to find.

The researchers review was published March 08, 2016 in the BMJ.

Story sources: Robert Preidt, http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/news/20160308/special-infant-formulas-dont-shield-against-asthma-allergies-study

Victoria Groce, http://foodallergies.about.com/od/adultfoodallergies/p/hypoallergenic.htm

 

Daily Dose

Food Textures

1:30 to read

If you have a baby between the ages of 8-9 months and have already been offering them pureed baby foods it may be time to start some textures as well.  Many parents are a bit “wary” of offering any food that hasn’t been totally pureed, but it is important that your baby starts to experiment with foods that have different consistencies. 

Of course this does not mean you hand your baby anything that they could choke on like a grape, or piece of meat etc. But instead of totally pureeing carrots, why not cook them well, chop them up a bit and put them on the high chair tray. It is fun to watch how they touch and feel the carrots, before they “smoosh and moosh” them and get them to their mouths.   

There are so many foods that are easily offered to a baby to get them used to feeling different textures.  This is the very beginning of experimenting with finger foods, and this doesn’t just mean puffs or cheerios either. I like to encourage babies to feel cold, gooey, warm, sticky, all sorts of different textures which will ultimately help them become better and more adventuresome eaters as they get older.  

Unfortunately, I see far too many little ones (and not so little ones too) continuing to eat totally pureed foods and then becoming adverse to textures as they did not get the experience at an early enough age. 

It is also fun to watch your child as they begin to pick up foods that have been chopped and diced into small soft pieces. In the early stages they have to scoop and lick the food from their fingers and hands, but very quickly their pincer grasp takes over and suddenly they can pick up that well cooked green bean or pea!!  Such a feat and worthy of a home video to send to the grandparents for sure. 

So, put out some mushy food and let them play - I know it is messy but that is what being a kid is often about!

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