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Daily Dose

Peanut Allergies

1:30 to read

Did you see the New England Journal of Medicine article which was recently published regarding peanut allergy? Interestingly, the study out of the UK seemed to confirm what some of us “old school pediatricians” had thought... the previous recommendation that babies and toddlers avoid peanut products in the first year of life may actually lead to more peanut allergies in children who are already at risk for developing food allergies.

In the late 1990’s allergists were concerned about the rise in peanut allergies and recommendations were made to delay introduction of peanuts (as well as some other foods).  At the time it did seem strange seeing that children born prior to this were raised on peanut butter...but like many things, nothing stays the same, right?

But over the years, the increase in peanut allergies continued, despite the fact that mothers were not eating peanut products during their pregnancy or while breast feeding and parents were delaying the introduction of peanut products until their child was 2 years of age. When the data from this period was analyzed, instead of seeing a decrease in children with peanut allergies... the incidence of peanut allergies continued to increase.

So, in 2008 the AAP changed their recommendations and again encouraged parents to let their children eat peanut products in the first year of life just NO peanuts due to the choking hazard.  But many parents continued to be wary...in fact some, who had no history suggesting allergies ( eczema, wheezing, family history of food allergies), would actually bring peanut butter to my office for a trial. One mother came for a quick “house call” one day and I handed her child (who was 20 months at the time) a peanut butter cracker I was eating and her mother “freaked out”.  Fortunately, the child loved the cracker and no issues with peanut butter either. She was thrilled when she left with another cracker in hand 

This article was just the first of many studies being undertaken to “help solve the puzzle of food allergies”. There is so much about this topic on the horizon but in the meantime, if your child does not have a  history to suggest allergies I would try introducing peanut butter, almond butter, as well as eggs and dairy to your child. If you have a family history of food allergies, or concerns talk to your doctor about beginning these foods earlier than later even if that is in a controlled situation in the pediatrician’s or allergist’s office.

I can’t wait to give baby granddaughter some of these foods as well (she just started to get some veggies) and peanut butter is not far behind.  I did “sneak” her a morsel of pancake the other morning...you should have seen that smile.

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