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Timeless Motherly Advice

It's mother's day! Time to celebrate great advice. Here's a few pieces of wisdom I've learned from my mom.I have been visiting my mother for an “early Mother’s Day” celebration and spent an evening over dinner reminiscing about all of the advice she has given me over the years.  The funny thing is that I often catch myself talking to my own children, and even my patients, and say, “I am sounding just like my mother”.  The reason being is that she has given me a lot of good advice.

[caption id="attachment_11452" align="alignleft" width="150" caption="My Mom"][/caption] The best advice which has been long lasting is “do the best that you can and you can be anything you want.”  Both she and my dad told me that, while they continued to support me as I pursued a career in medicine. Boy, was I lucky or what? She also told me “you should also always be able to take care of yourself”.  That has also been great advice and something I have told my own children. The good news for me is that my children have listened to me (to date) and I am so proud of their work ethic, their integrity and their goals. They have made it easy to parent them. Another good piece of advice remains as true today as it was 40 years ago (at least I think it does). “Never chase a boy (they always had to call first) and all of your dates must come to the door to meet the parents”. Again, as a mother of sons, I have told them how important it is to go to the door, make eye contact with the girl’s parents, introduce themselves, and to let the parent know that they are responsible gentleman and will always respect their daughter”. This advice is timeless, and I saw it first hand when our oldest son went to ask his now father-in law for his daughter’s hand in marriage. It made me so proud to hear how responsible and respectful he had been. (He listened!) A key piece of motherly advice, which is both timeless and ageless? Learn from your mistakes.  Everyone makes mistakes but it is how you react to them and what you learn that makes all the difference.  We’re not perfect! These last few “Jeanne-isms” (my mom) are cute and memorable:

  1. No white shoes before Easter or after Labor Day
  2. Stand up straight and hold your shoulders back (echoed a million times)
  3. If you can’t say something nice, don’t say it at all (timeless)

I know you too have memories of wonderful mom advice.  Keep passing these to your children. Many are timeless, no matter what we used to think! Now it's time to celebrate your mom! We've teamed up with Verizon Texas to recognize the matriarch in your life. Visit and tell us why your mom rocks. The winner will receive a diamond pendant! Happy Mother’s Day to all!

Your Toddler

12 Tips to Make a Home Safer for the Grandkids


Grandparents and grandkids are two-way blessings. Grandchildren benefit from having a close relationship with their grandparents. They have an extra pair of eyes to watch over them and a lot of hugging and spoiling.

Grandparents get the joy of being around their grandchildren, watching them grow and develop and yes- spoiling them.

Many younger families depend on grandparents to supplement with childcare. Some grandparents are the preferred choice for day care. And of course, sometimes it’s just a family visit.

Not all grandparents think about making their home safer for the grandkids because they aren’t always around them. They may not be aware of what to look for or what to do to make their home safer for little ones. It may have been a long time since a grandparent has had to think about having a child in the house. A lot more information is quickly available regarding child safety than in years past.

The American Association for Retired Persons (AARP) recently published an article with tips for making a home safe for grandchildren. Reading it reminded me of when my child was little and the visits our family used to have with my husband’s parents and mine. I never thought about having a list of suggestions to help them safeguard their home for our child. Most of the time there wasn’t a problem, but occasionally there were big safety issues that they just hadn’t thought about.

If you’ve been thinking about how to talk with yours or your spouse’s parents about making their home more kid-proof – here’s some excellent tips from “ Grandparent Central”, AARP:

1. Keep meds out of reach. About 38 percent of child-poisoning cases involve grandparents' medications, so clear all drugs from countertops, tables and drawers. Put a childproof lock on the medicine cabinet. Make sure your purse is not within reach of your grandchild.

2. Get rid of crib-clutter. Not long ago, cribs were filled with such things as stuffed toys, little pillows, bumper pads and blankets. Nowadays, more people are aware that these items can present a suffocation hazard and are best left out of the crib

3. Baby should sleep on back. Make sure that baby is sleeping on his or her back and not face down or on their side in the crib.

4. Lock up detergent pods. These colorful packets of liquid laundry or dishwasher soap look like candy. They can pose "a serious poisoning risk to young children," says a study in the journal Pediatrics. If you use these products, make sure they are locked in a cabinet and cannot be accessed by curious little hands.

5. Make furniture tip-proof. Flat-screen TVs and modern furniture are particularly prone to tipping if little ones try to pull themselves up. Attach anti-tip brackets or straps to safely secure these items. And don't forget outlet covers, drawer locks, stairway gates, and edge and corner guards for furniture.

6. Walkers and wheelchairs. These items may look like toys to a young child. Make sure they are either out of sight or that someone keeps an eye on the child if they seem a little too intrigued by them.

7. Keep guns under lock and key. One of the most important tips! If you're among the 1 in 3 Americans with a gun, always keep it unloaded in a locked cabinet, with the ammunition stored separately.

8. Be present when your grandchild is with your pet. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 77,000 children under age 10 are treated each year in emergency rooms for dog bites.

9. Guard pools and drains.  Always keep your cell phone with you when your grandchild is in the pool in case you need to call 911. If you've got a backyard pool or hot tub, you likely know to prevent access with a childproof gate. But you may not be aware of the danger of drains: Suction forces can be powerful enough to trap small children underwater.

10. Watch all water. Since toddlers' heads are heavy in proportion to bodies, they can easily be pulled down. That's why even an inch of standing water is dangerous. Put a childproof lock on the toilet and drain bathwater immediately.

11. Stove safety. When kids are around, use back burners and always keep handles of pots and pans turned in.

12. Beware of choking hazards. 5 of the most overlooked choking hazards for young children are mini-batteries, jewelry, refrigerator magnets, pen caps and loose change. Five items you may not typically think about.

These 12 tips are obviously good for every family household but may be particularly helpful when someone is not used to having children at their house for extended periods of time.

Grandparents and grandchildren often share a special bond that can grow even more secure and stronger when the home safe during their visit.

Story source: Bulletin staff,

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Struggling with feeding your kids healthy (er) meals. Rule of thumb: don't stress over it!


Struggling with feeding your kids healthy (er) meals. Rule of thumb: don't stress over it!

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