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Daily Dose

Medicine Dosing Errors

1:30 to read

How do you give your baby/toddler/child their medications? In a recent article in Pediatrics it was found that up to 80 percent of parents have made a dosing error when administering liquid medicine to their children.  The study looked at children eight years old or younger. 

 

In the study both English and Spanish speaking parents were asked to measure different amounts of liquid medicines using different “tools”, including a dosing cup, and different sized syringes. They also were given different instructions with either text only or text with pictures. The different dosing tools were labeled with either milliliters/teaspoon or milliliters only.  Lots of variables! 

 

Not surprising to me, the parents who used the texts/picture combination instructions and who also used the milliliter only labeled dosing tools had the lowest incidence of dosing errors.  When parents had to use any math skills to calculate the correct dosage there were more dosing errors.  Most dosing errors were also overdosing rather than under-dosing the liquid medications.

 

This was an important article not only for parents to realize that it is not uncommon to make an error when giving their child medication, but also for doctors who write the prescriptions.  Before electronic medical records and “e-prescribing” I would typically write medication instructions in milliliters and teaspoons…in other words “take 5ml/1 tsp by mouth once daily”.  With electronic record you can only make one dosing choice which I now do in milliliters. But, with that being said, I still get phone calls from parents asking “how many teaspoons is 7.5 ml?”.

 

Previous studies have also shown numerous dosing errors when parents use kitchen teaspoons and tablespoons to try and measure their child’s medication. 

 

Some over the counter drug makers have tried to cut down on dosing errors with their liquid medications by making all of their products, whether for infants or children, the same strength. The only difference is the dosing tool that accompanies the medicine (syringe vs cup).  Interestingly, these medications may have a price difference when they are actually the same thing.  

 

This study may help to find strategies for comprehensive labeling/dosing for pediatric liquid medications, which will ultimately reduce errors.  Stay tuned for more!

 

 

 

 

 

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