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Daily Dose

Jaundice in Newborns

1:30 to read

It is not at all uncommon for a healthy newborn to develop jaundice in the first several days of life. Bilirubin is produced when red blood cells are broken down. It is a yellow pigment that we all metabolize in the liver and then it is excreted in urine and stools. In an newborn, the body produces almost 2-3 times the bilirubin that an adult does. Because newborns are also “immature” their liver cannot keep up with the bilirubin production and therefore bilirubin levels rise. In some cases the bilirubin is high enough to cause a yellowing of the skin (jaundice), and this is termed physiologic jaundice of the newborn. 

 

Your infant will have their bilirubin level checked while they are in the hospital and your pediatrician will follow any bilirubin levels that seem to be rising. In most hospitals the bilirubin is tested transcutaneously (through the skin), and you may never know that you baby has been tested. If bilirubin levels seem to be high, a blood test will be performed to more accurately assess the bilirubin level. If bilirubin levels continue to rise a baby may then be put under phototherapy (special blue lights that breaks down bilirubin in the skin and help it to be eliminated). Phototherapy prevents extremely high levels of bilirubin which may get into the brain and could be toxic to the baby and cause brain damage.

 

When a baby is put under phototherapy they may be in a basinette or wrapped in a “bili-blanket”  and they will wear sunglasses to prevent any damage to their eyes from light. They are usually naked or only in a diaper so that as much skin is exposed as possible. In most cases the bilirubin levels have peaked by day of life 3 or 4 and the baby will no longer need phototherapy. While the baby is under the “bili-lights” they will continue to have blood tests (from their heels) to follow the bilirubin levels.

 

As babies are now being discharged in 24-48 hours after delivery some babies will develop jaundice after they have already gone home…so you your doctor will plan on seeing you 1 to 2 days after your are discharged. But, should you notice that your baby seems to be getting more jaundiced you should call you doctor and be seen sooner.  

 

Just this week I saw a baby who continued to become more jaundiced after he went home. At times I see this when a mother is breast feeding and her milk has not yet “come in”.  If a baby is not getting a lot of milk then they cannot poop and pee out bilirubin…somethings just take time to get going with feeding, peeing, pooping and liver maturation. So…this baby boy was started o home phototherapy. Rather than re-admitting him to the hospital, a pediatric home health care company sent out a nurse with a bill blanket who instructed the parents on the use of it. The baby was then able to feed at home every 2-3 hours, and the bili-blanket was used throughout the day and night. The parents lived so close to the office that they would bring the baby in for bilirubin tests, while in other cases the nurse will go to the home to do the testing.  Home phototherapy in an otherwise healthy infant does not disrupt the new family and really helps the mother establish her breast feeding and lets “everyone” sleep in their own beds!

 

This baby only required phototherapy for 24 hours…in some babies it may be longer. Once the bilirubin was back in a “safe range” the lights were discontinued and he will continue to process the bilirubin on his own. His little yellow face and eyes will be the last evidence of his newborn jaundice and “one for the baby books” as it should never be a problem again.

 

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