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Daily Dose

Ear Infections

1:30 to read

Musings from the very busy pediatric office:  with all of the advances in technology over the last 30 years why is it that examining a child’s ears and visualizing their eardrum continues to be challenging?  I started thinking about this while examining a very unhappy, strong and febrile toddler….probably the 20th patient of the day. 

 

During the “sick season” many of the patients who come to my office are young children whose parents are worried that they may have an ear infection.  This concern is one of the most frequent reasons for pediatric office visits. While I realize that many of my colleagues are in the operating room operating on brains or doing open heart surgery (truly saving lives) the one advantage that they have is that their patient is under anesthesia while they are doing complicated procedures. Which only means that they are not trying to wrestle, cajole, or coax a child into letting them look into their ear canal, and then only to find that you can’t see a thing as the canal is full of wax (cerumen).  

 

At times examining ears can be fairly simple and straight forward, but some days it seems that it may be easier to attempt to fly than to look at a 16 month old child’s ears. Today was one of those days. It seemed that every child I saw had a temperature over 102 degrees, and they all had “waxy” ears. While there are several ways to remove wax from the ear canal, none of them is easily done in a toddler, especially when the wax is hard and difficult to remove. Having 3 children myself and one who had recurrent ear infections and tympanostomy tubes, I know what it is like to have to hold your child on the pediatrician’s exam table while they irrigate or “dig” wax out of the ears.  Not fun….!!!  But, at the same time I realize that this is the only means to see if the ear is infected and if there is the need for an antibiotic. 

 

With the advent of the HIB and Pneumococcal vaccines the incidence of ear infections has dropped significantly, as these bacteria were common causes of otitis. But, ear infections are still the #1 reason that a child receives an antibiotic, especially in the first 2 years of life.  Therefore, a good ear exam is one of the most important things your pediatrician does, as I know you don’t want your child to receive an unnecessary antibiotic!

 

Please know that pediatricians do not enjoy making a child uncomfortable, but somehow that ear drum needs to be seen…especially in a sick child.   

 

So…why has some brilliant medical device inventor not found a way to wave a magic wand over a child’s ear to “tell me” if their ear is infected?  To date, I have not seen any “new” ways to accurately examine an ear other than with the otoscope…and a clean ear canal…which means unhappy children (and parents ) while I try to clean their ears.  

 

Remember, don’t use q-tips in your child’s ears and if your pediatrician has to struggle a bit to clean out  your child’s ears, it is only because they are doing a good job!!  I am waiting for the “easy” button.

   

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