Did you read the latest AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) position statement which addressed the issue of choking among children?   Choking is unfortunately a common problem in the pediatric population and prevention of choking is a topic I discuss with all parents as their children begin eating table food.

[caption id="attachment_6795" align="alignleft" width="131" caption="Choking Hazard"]Choking Hazard[/caption]

Children under the age of 3 have the greatest frequency of choking and hot dogs are a major concern for causing choking.  Due to this, the AAP has recommended that food manufacturers “design new food and redesign existing food to minimize choking risk”. They also state that foods that pose a high choking risk (peanuts, hard candy, grapes, apples, popcorn and chewing gum) should also get warning labels.

But this may sound crazy, while knowing that choking is a problem in the pediatric population, I cannot understand a recommendation to change the shape of a hot dog.  A hot dog is a hot dog and if flattened it will then be called bologna.

Hot dogs are not the issue, as grapes and peanuts cause choking and we cannot advocate changing their shapes.  Rather, it seems to me to be an issue with educating parents and making parents responsible for cutting up their children’s food.

Parents need to be parents and take responsibility for protecting their children but not by changing the shape of a hot dog.  Think of all of the different objects that can cause choking, coins, toys, buttons, weird small objects that toddlers find on the floor.

We cannot protect our children from all small objects and at the same time, things that we have control over, such as a hot dog or a grape, should be cut into small pieces before giving them to a child.  Lollipops also cause choking and some pediatricians still give lollipops after an office visit.  Hotdogs and lollipops are just what they are, they cannot be changed.

We educate parents about using sunscreen (but we did not change the sun) and we are concerned about drowning and advocate fences and pool safety, but we don’t stop going outside or playing in a pool in the summer.

Keep talking to parents about the risk of choking, advocate that all parents take infant and child CPR, cut up a child’s food until they are old enough to tell you that they know how to use a knife, but don’t outlaw hot dogs.  I will eat a hotdog at the ballpark or state fair, but not bologna.

That's your daily dose for today.  We'll chat again soon.