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Parenting

Cradle and Bassinet Safety Tips

1:45

Cradles and bassinets can be convenient for parents and comfortable for babies. You can move them easily from room to room, letting you keep an eye on baby during the day. At night, you can keep your baby in your own bedroom during the first few weeks of life as you and baby adjust to a new sleeping schedule.

In recent years, cradles and bassinets have gained new features: You can buy ones that vibrate, are on wheels, swivel from side to side, or nestle next to your bed for co-sleeping without bed-sharing. They’re also great for trips to see the grandparents.

While they are handy, cradles and bassinets are not substitutes for a crib. Babies outgrow them, so you’ll need a crib sooner or later, but they can be useful.

Just like cribs, there are important safety tips to be aware of when using cradles and bassinets:

  • Avoid bassinets and cradles with a motion or rocking feature, as these have caused suffocation when babies rolled against the edge. If you use an heirloom-rocking cradle, supervise your infant while in use.
  • As with a crib, a bassinet, cradle, sleeper or play yard should have a firm mattress that fits snugly without any space around the edges so a baby’s head can’t get wedged in and lead to suffocation. The American Academy of Pediatrics has not yet weighed in on the safety of these products; some pediatricians have warned parents that they are not safe for overnight sleeping. Parents should err on the side of caution and use only products that comply with safe-sleep recommendations.
  • If you have pets or other young children in the house – for instance, a dog who might knock over a bassinet, a cat who might climb in, or a toddler who might try to lift your baby from a bassinet – stick with a crib.
  • Moses baskets - a woven basket with handles - are often lined with puffy fabric, which raises a baby's risk for suffocation or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and are best avoided.

Bassinets and cradles are designed for babies under 5 months old, and who cannot push up on hands and knees.

These temporary products can be helpful for keeping an eye on your baby while they are napping, if you need to move from room to room or stay overnight in another home. Parents and caregivers need to make sure any cradle or bassinet used meets current CPSIA safety standards.

Story sources: https://www.babycenter.com/bassinets-baskets

 

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