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Your Child

Testing Your Child for Hearing Problems

1:30

Hearing well is critical to a child’s social, emotional and cognitive development.  When hearing problems are diagnosed early, most are treatable. So it’s important to have your little one’s hearing tested, ideally by the time your baby is 3 months old.

Hearing loss is more common that you’d probably expect. It affects about 1 to 3 babies out of every 1,000.

Although many things can lead to hearing loss, about half the time, no cause is found.

Hearing loss can occur if a child:

•       Was born prematurely

•       Stayed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)

•       Had newborn jaundice with bilirubin level high enough to require a blood transfusion

•       Was given medications that can lead to hearing loss

•       Has family members with childhood hearing loss

•       Had certain complications at birth

•       Had many ear infections

•       Had infections such as meningitis or cytomegalovirus

•       Was exposed to very loud sounds or noises, even briefly

When should your child be evaluated for hearing loss? Newborns should have a hearing screening before being discharged from the hospital. Every state and territory in the U.S. has a program called Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI). The program identifies every child with permanent hearing loss before 3 months of age, and provides intervention services before 6 months of age. If your baby doesn't have this screening, or was born at home or a birthing center, it's important to have a hearing screening within the first 3 weeks of life.

If your newborn doesn't pass the initial hearing screening, it's important to get a retest within 3 months so treatment can begin right away. Treatment for hearing loss can be the most effective if it's started before a child is 6 months old.

Children who seem to have normal hearing should continue to have their hearing evaluated at regular doctor’s appointments from ages 4 to 10 years of age.

If your child seems to have trouble hearing, if speech development seems abnormal, or if your child's speech is difficult to understand, talk with your doctor.

Even if your newborn passes the hearing screening, continue to watch for signs that hearing is normal. Some hearing milestones your child should reach in the first year of life:

•       Most newborn infants startle or "jump" to sudden loud noises.

•       By 3 months, a baby usually recognizes a parent's voice.

•       By 6 months, a baby can usually turn his or her eyes or head toward a sound.

•       By 12 months, a baby can usually imitate some sounds and produce a few words, such as "Mama" or "bye-bye."

As your baby grows into a toddler, signs of a hearing loss may include:

•       Limited, poor, or no speech

•       Frequently inattentive

•       Difficulty learning

•       Seems to need higher TV volume

•       Fails to respond to conversation-level speech or answers inappropriately to speech

•       Fails to respond to his or her name or easily frustrated when there's a lot of background noise 

There are several ways your child’s hearing can be tested depending on his or her age, development and health.

During behavioral tests, an audiologist carefully watches a child respond to sounds like calibrated speech (speech that is played with a particular volume and intensity) and pure tones. A pure tone is a sound with a very specific pitch (frequency), like a note on a keyboard.

An audiologist may know an infant or toddler is responding by his or her eye movements or head turns. A preschooler may move a game piece in response to a sound, and a grade-schooler may raise a hand. Children can respond to speech with activities like identifying a picture of a word or repeating words softly.

Doctors can also examine a child for hearing loss by looking at how well his or her ear, nerves and brain are functioning.

If a hearing problem is suspected, a pediatric audiologist specializing in testing and helping kids with hearing loss can be contacted. They work closely with doctors, teachers, and speech/language pathologists.

Audiologists have a lot of specialized training. They have a Masters or Doctorate degree in audiology, have performed internships, and are certified by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (CCC-A) or are Fellows of the American Academy of Audiology (F-AAA).

Children with certain types of hearing loss have several options for treatment. They may be helped with surgery or hearing aids. The most common type of hearing loss involves outer hair cells that do not work properly. Hearing aids can make sounds louder and overcome this problem.

A cochlear implant is a surgical treatment for hearing loss; this device doesn't cure hearing loss, but is a device that gets placed into the inner ear to send sound directly to the hearing nerve. It can help children with profound hearing loss who do not benefit from hearing aids.

Making sure that your child is hearing well is one of the first steps you can take to helping him or her do well socially, academically and developmentally.

Story source: Thierry Morlet, PhD, Rupal Christine Gupta, MD,

http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/hear.html

 

Your Child

Safety Recalls: Finger Paints, Baby Bathtubs, Strollers and More

2:00

The American Academy of Pediatrics’ (AAP) online Gateway issue has listed several children’s products that have been recalled due to health and safety concerns.

The list includes

·      Sargent Art tempera finger paints, Lil’ Luxuries Whirlpool, Bubbling Spa & Shower

·      Peg Perego’s 850 Polaris Sportsman ATV-style ride on toy

·      Mamas & Papas’ Armadillo Flip and Armadillo Flip XT strollers

·      Fiddle Diddles LullaBelay adjustable car seat strap system

·      Chimparoo brand Trek baby carriers

Sargent Art tempera finger paints: About 2.8 million units of paint have been recalled. The paint can contain harmful bacteria, putting children with weak immune systems at risk of serious illness. Those with healthy immune systems may not be affected.

Recalled are 13 types of Sargent Art tempera and finger paints. All colors and sizes of the following types of paints are recalled: Art-Time brand of tempera paint, washable finger paint, washable fluorescent finger paint, washable fluorescent tempera paint, washable glitter finger paint, washable paint and fluorescent tempera paint.

Sold at: Hobby Lobby, Wal-Mart and other stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com and ShopSargentArt.com from May 2015 to June 2016 for $1 to $8.

Stop using the paints and contact the company for a refund at 800-827-8081 or visit www.sargentart.com.

Lil’ Luxuries Whirlpool, Bubbling Spa & Shower: About 86,000 units have been recalled. Fabric slings can come off the infant bathtubs, and infants can fall or drown.

Lil’ Luxuries Whirlpool, Bubbling Spa & Shower is a battery-operated whirlpool bath with motorized jets intended for use with children from birth to 2 years. The product has a fabric sling on a plastic frame onto which the infant is placed for bathing. The fabric sling on the tub does not have a white plastic clip to attach the headrest area of the fabric sling to the plastic frame. Recalled bathtubs have numbers 18840, 18850, 18863 or 18873 with date codes starting with 1210, 1211, 1212, 1301, 1302, 1303, 1304, 1305, 1306, 1307 or 1308, which stand for the two-digit year followed by the two-digit month, on the fabric sling.

The products were sold at Toys R Us/Babies R Us and other juvenile product specialty stores nationwide from October 2012 through October 2013 for about $60. The tubs also might have been sold secondhand.

Stop using the fabric sling in the tub, and contact the company for a replacement sling with a white plastic attachment clip. You can call 844-612-4254 or visit http://bit.ly/2f1wQNG.

Peg Perego’s 850 Polaris Sportsman ATV-style ride on toy, About 3,000 toys were recalled. A relay on the circuit board can fail causing the vehicle’s motor to overheat and catch fire.

Recalled are Peg Perego’s 850 Polaris Sportsman ride-on, 24-volt battery-operated toy vehicles for children ages 5 to 7 years. The ATV-style vehicles for two people are silver, red and black and have four wheels, a flip-up backrest for the back passenger and a front and rear luggage rack. Vehicles with date codes 651016, 651017, 651020, 651021, 651022, 651023, 651024, 651027, 651028, 651029, 651030, 660304, 660305, 661123, 661124, 661125 and 661130 are recalled. The date code is under the vehicle seat. Sportsman Twin and 850 EFI are printed on the side and Polaris is on the side of the seat.

Items were sold at online retailers including Amazon.com, Cabelas.com, Target.com, ToysRUs.com and Walmart.com from October 2014 through April 2016 for $500 to $600.

Remedy is to Contact Peg Perego for a replacement circuit board with instructions, including shipping. Call 877-737-3464, email 850recall@pegperego.com or visit https://us.pegperego.com/cs/recalls/.

Mamas & Papas’ Armadillo Flip and Armadillo Flip XT strollers: About 3,000 strollers have been recalled. A loose latch on the stroller can cause the infant in the seat to tip back unexpectedly and possibly fall out when facing the parent.

Recalled are Mamas & Papas’ Armadillo Flip and Armadillo Flip XT strollers. All models are folding strollers for one infant. They come in black, teal and navy and weigh about 22 pounds. Lot number ranges for recalled Armadillo Flip strollers are 00814 through 00416. Lot number ranges for the Flip XT are 01214 through 00416. The number is printed on the sewn-in label on the stroller.

Strollers were sold at Albee Baby, Babies ‘R’ Us, Buy Buy Baby and other stores nationwide and online at www.mamasandpapas.com and www.amazon.com from December 2014 through July 2016 for $500.

Stop using the strollers and contact the company for a repair at 800-309-6312 or visit www.mamasandpapas.com/us.

Fiddle Diddles LullaBelay adjustable car seat strap system: About 250 units have been recalled. The carabiners attached to the strap system have small parts inside that can come loose and be swallowed and choked on by young children.

The Fiddle Diddles LullaBelay adjustable car seat strap system with model number LB1001 includes two fabric straps, carabiner hardware, a mesh car seat cover and a tote bag. The carabiners are used to hang a car seat from a shopping cart. The model number is printed on the straps.

They were sold at Amazon.com from November 2015 through June 2016 and Fiddlediddles.com from May through June 2015 and at Zoolikins stores in Arizona from November 2015 through June 2016 for about $40.

You can contact the company for a repair kit with three new carabiners. Call 888-741-2957, email info@fiddlediddles.com or visit http://fiddlediddles.com/replacement-kit.html.

Chimparoo brand Trek baby carriers: About 130 units are being recalled. The carriers’ side strap can loosen unexpectedly from the buckle, and the child can fall out.

Recalled are Chimparoo brand Trek baby carriers that allow the user to carry a baby tummy to tummy, on the hip or on the back. The 100% twill fabric carriers were sold in 18 solid, striped and pattern color combinations. The carriers attach to the wearer’s body with adjustable straps made of polypropylene webbing and plastic buckles. “Chimparoo” is printed on the upper right hand corner of the carrier. “Trek” is embroidered on the belt.

The carriers were sold at Children’s boutique stores, such as Granola Babies, of Costa Mesa, Calif., Eat/Sleep/Play, of Summerville, S.C., and Top to Bottom, of Omaha, Neb., and online at www.Amazon.com and www.Chimaparoo.ca from May through July 2016 for about $170.

Contact the company for a replacement buckle for the baby carrier’s side-buckle. Call 855-289-5343, email safety@Chimparoo.com or visit www.Chimparoo.ca/en/recall.

Story source: Trisha Korioth, at http://www.aappublications.org/news/2016/11/17/HealthAlerts111716

Your Child

Dog Bites and Young Children

1:30

Most young kids can read a dog well enough to know if it is angry or scared, but they may be confused over whether to approach one or not, according to a new British study.

While young children often knew an angry dog was trouble, they were just as likely to approach a frightened dog as a happy one.

Co-author of the study, Sarah Rose, of Staffordshire University, and her team examined hospital statistics of children in the U.K. bitten by a dog.

"This study explored whether the explanation is that they are unable to accurately recognize a dog's emotions when approaching one," she said in a news release from the British Psychological Society.

The researchers asked two groups of kids to look at images and brief videos of dogs. The first group was 57 children between the ages of 4 and 5. The second group included 61 children, ages 6 to 7. Some of the videos and images showed dogs that appeared to be angry or frightened.

The researchers then asked the children to describe the apparent emotion of the dog and say whether they'd be willing to play with the dog.

The researchers found that children were able to recognize happy, angry and frightened dogs to a greater degree than chance would suggest.

They were most attuned to angry dogs, but less successful at recognizing happy or frightened dogs. They didn't seem to understand that they shouldn't approach a frightened dog.

Dog bites are a problem in the United States as well. They are the second most frequent cause of visits to emergency rooms from 9 activities common among children such as sports, skateboarding and All-terrain vehicles.

The U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates half of all children 12 years-of-age and under have been bitten by a dog. In many cases, teasing or an unintentional provocation, such as approaching a dog while it's eating or sleeping, can lead to a dog bite or even worse, an attack.  The vast majority of dog bites are from a dog that the child is acquainted with - his or her own, a neighbor's, or a friend's dog.  Seventy nine percent of fatal dog attacks are on children.

"Young children are relatively good at accurately identifying the emotion that a dog is displaying," Rose said. "However, children's understanding of safety around dogs is lacking, as they only demonstrated caution about approaching angry dogs. They appeared to be unaware that there might be problems approaching frightened dogs. This finding should help inform dog bite prevention campaigns."

Studies have shown that even a single dog bite prevention lesson incorporated into a regular school day has been shown to dramatically reduce high-risk behaviors toward unfamiliar dogs in both very young (kindergarten) and middle school children.

Most children learn about dogs and other animals from their home environment. Parents can go the extra step in helping to prevent dog-related injuries by teaching their children that scared dogs are similar to angry dogs in how they react to being approached.

Young children, particularly toddlers, should never be left unsupervised around a dog- even a family pet.

Story sources: Randy Dotinga, https://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/misc-kid-s-health-news-435/young-kids-unaware-of-the-risks-of-approaching-scared-dogs-714883.html

http://www.safetyarounddogs.org/statistics.html

 

 

Your Child

Are Soft Contact Lenses Safe for Teens and Children?

1:45

While many kids and teens that have to wear eyeglasses would like to switch to soft contact lenses, their parents may be wondering if they are safe for these age groups. The short answer is yes, according to a new review.

"In the past decade, there has been increasing interest in fitting children with contact lenses," said review author Mark Bullimore, an adjunct professor at the University of Houston College of Optometry.

He reviewed nine studies that included 7- to 19-year-olds who use soft contact lenses, to gauge the risk of corneal inflammation and infection. Called "corneal infiltrative events," these are usually mild, but about 5 percent involve a serious infection called microbial keratitis.

The studies revealed that children wearing contact lenses, typically, experience reactions similar to adults. In fact, one large study showed that events in younger children (8 to 12) were much lower than in teenagers from 13 to 17 years of age.

Also, researchers found that microbial keratitis was uncommon. One study actually found no cases in younger kids, and the teen rates of infection were the same as adults.

The difference may be attributed to the daily living habits of the age groups.  It's suspected that younger kids aren't showering or napping while wearing their contact lenses as often as teens do. Those behaviors increase the risk of corneal infiltrative events, Bullimore said.

Bullimore believes the findings should reassure parents about the safety of soft contacts for children and teens. They may improve young people's self-esteem and quality of life, and have been shown to prevent or slow progression of nearsightedness in children, he said.

"The overall picture is that the incidence of corneal infiltrative events in children is no higher than in adults, and in the youngest age range ... it may be markedly lower," Bullimore wrote in the review.

Parents can help kids avoid eye infections by supervising their youngster’s cleaning and wearing habits when using contact lenses, Bullimore added.

Soft contacts are now available with no age restrictions. Parents should talk with their child’s optician or optometrist for more information on transitioning from glasses to soft contacts.

The study was published in the journal Optometry and Vision Science.

Story source: Robert Preidt, https://consumer.healthday.com/eye-care-information-13/eye-and-vision-problem-news-295/soft-contact-lenses-safe-for-kids-and-teens-review-finds-723398.html

Your Child

Childhood Mental Health Problems Linked to Adult Troubles

2:00

 

Children who suffer from poor mental health may also have a lower chance of success later in life, according to a new study from researchers at Duke University.

The scientists found that children with mental health problems such as depression, anxiety and/or behavioral problems were six times more likely than those with no psychiatric problems to have difficulties in adulthood.

Those later struggles included addiction, early pregnancy, criminal charges, and difficulty getting and keeping jobs, education failures and housing instability, the study authors said.

Researchers analyzed data from more than 1,400 participants in 11 North Carolina counties who were followed from childhood through adulthood. Most of the study participants are now in their 30s.

While still in childhood, about 26 percent of the participants met the criteria for depression, anxiety or a behavioral disorder, 31 percent had milder forms below the full threshold of a diagnosis, and nearly 43 percent had no mental health problems.

Researchers followed up with the participants as adults.

Among those diagnosed with a psychiatric disorder in childhood, more than 59 percent had a serious challenge in adulthood and about 34 percent had numerous problems. The rates among those with milder forms of mental illness were about 42 percent and 23 percent, respectively.

"When it comes to key psychiatric problems -- depression, anxiety, behavior disorders -- there are successful interventions and prevention programs," study author William Copeland, an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, said in a Duke news release.

"So, we do have the tools to address these, but they aren't implemented widely. The burden is then later seen in adulthood, when these problems become costly public health and social issues," he added.

The findings show the need to treat mental health problems early. But, only about 40 percent of children with diagnosed psychiatric disorders receive treatment, and the rate is even lower for those with milder mental health problems, according to Copeland.

"A big problem with mental health in the United States is that most children don't get treatment and those who do don't get what we would consider optimal care," he said. "So the problems go on much longer than they need to and cost much more than they should in both money and damaged lives."

Parents and family members are typically the first to notice if a child seems to have problems with emotions or behavior, but may not know when they should seek professional help for a child.  The following signs may indicate the need for professional help:

•       Decline in school performance

•       Poor grades despite strong efforts

•       Constant worry or anxiety

•       Repeated refusal to go to school or to take part in normal activities

•       Hyperactivity or fidgeting

•       Persistent nightmares

•       Persistent disobedience or aggression

•       Frequent temper tantrums

•       Depression, sadness or irritability

Getting children help when they are young can change the course of their lives. If you suspect your child may need a mental health evaluation, talk with your pediatrician or family doctor about available resources.

While the study found an association between poor mental health in childhood and problems later in life, it did not prove a cause-and-effect link. However, even children with mild or passing episodes of psychiatric problems were found to be at an increase risk for struggles later in life.

The study was published in the July 15th issue of the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

Sources: Robert Preidt, http://consumer.healthday.com/kids-health-information-23/kids-ailments-health-news-434/mental-health-problems-in-childhood-linked-to-greater-chances-of-trouble-in-adulthood-701298.html

http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/recognizing-mental-health-problems-children

Your Child

Early Childhood Trauma Tied to Learning, Behavioral Problems

2:00

When children five years old and younger experienced a traumatic event in their lives, the fall-out from that event can show up in learning and behavioral problems by the time they enter kindergarten, according to a new study. 

Traumatic events, also known as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), can range from physical, sexual or psychological abuse and neglect, substance abuse, mental illness, violence in the home to a family member in jail; anything that causes a great deal of stress or fear in a young child’s life.

The study, "Adverse Experiences in Early Childhood and Kindergarten Outcomes," in the February 2016 online edition of Pediatrics, includes data on more than 1,000 children in large U.S. cities whose teachers rated school performance at the end of kindergarten.

Students who'd experienced one or more previously reported ACE were significantly more likely to struggle in the classroom, displaying below-average language, literacy and math skills, as well as aggression and social problems.

The more adverse events a child experienced, according to the study, the more academic and behavior problems increased.

While it’s often said that children are resilient, and they are to a certain extent, when they are exposed to continuous traumatic situations, their body’s natural way of dealing with stress changes and the stress becomes toxic resulting in a higher risk of behavioral challenges, sickness and mental health problems.

Children who experience traumatic stressors will often look to the adults who care for them for reassurance that things will be okay and that they will be protected.

The most important adults in a young child's life are his/her caregivers and relatives. These adults can help reestablish security and stability for children who have experienced trauma by:

•       Answering children's questions in language they can understand, so that they can develop an understanding of the events and changes in their life

•       Developing family safety plans

•       Engaging in age-appropriate activities that stimulate the mind and body

•       Finding ways to have fun and relax together

•       Helping children expand their "feelings" vocabulary

•       Honoring family traditions that bring them close to the people they love, e.g., storytelling, holiday celebrations, reunions, trips

•       Looking for changes in behaviors

•       Helping children to get back on track

•       Setting and adhering to routines and schedules

•       Setting boundaries and limits with consistency and patience

•       Showing love and affection

Sometimes professional help is needed for children to learn new coping skills. In some cases family therapy is desirable. Parents or caregivers may wish to consult their pediatrician, their child's teacher, and/or their childcare provider for suggestions of professionals who specialize in early childhood mental health.

The authors of the study said they hope the findings encourage policymakers and practitioners to find ways for early childhood professionals like pediatricians and educators to work together to support at-risk children and their families. 

Sources: https://www.healthychildren.org/English/news/Pages/Early-Traumatic-Experiences-Tied-to-Learning-Behavioral-Difficulties-in-Kindergarten.aspx

http://www.nctsn.org/content/helping-young-children-who-have-been-exposed-trauma-families-and-caregivers

 

Your Child

Talking to Your Child About Tragic News Events

2:00

Another tragedy has taken place, this time a terrorist attack in Paris, France.  Children, adolescents and adults have lost their lives or been seriously injured while out for an evening of fun, errands or romance.  Media outlets have been covering the events, sometimes showing graphic video or photos from the bloody scenes.

When children view these images or hear the stories, they can become scared and worried that the same thing will happen to them. 

Whenever catastrophic local, national or global events take place, it’s easy to assume that your child doesn’t really know what is going on or understand the gravity. But, in this age of instant and abundant information, they most likely do. Children are very sensitive to their parents and friends’ feelings. They are more tuned in than you might think.

Children sense when their parents are really worried, whether they're watching the news or talking about it with others. No matter what children know about a crisis, it's especially disconcerting for them to realize that their parents are scared, angry or shocked.

When bad things happen, children want to know what is going on.  It doesn’t have to be an international event. Local tragedies such as a flood, tornado, shooting, kidnapping, suicide, house fire or car wreck can be more frightening to children than events taking place across the world or in another state.

So, how do you talk with your child about such unhappy and threatening things? I’ve turned to Mr. Rogers to share with you his calming and thoughtful insights. The first time he addressed this topic was after Robert Kennedy’s assassination. Parents and educators turned to him for guidance then and his advice still holds true today.

In times of crisis, children want to know, "Who will take care of me?" They're dependent on adults for their survival and security. They're naturally self-centered. Their world is small and their life experience is limited. They need to hear very clearly that their parents are doing all they can to take care of them and to keep them safe. They also need to know that people in the government, in their community and in the world, and other people they don't even know, are working hard to keep them safe, too.

One of the ways young children express feelings is through play. However, sometimes events that happen are violent, so parents need to be nearby to redirect play if it takes a turn in that direction. More nurturing play can help children process the different activities and needs that happen around certain types of events. Play involving being a doctor or nurse in a hospital setting or creating a pretend meal for emergency workers or families can help children understand that there are good people and helpful actions that also take place when something bad happens.

When children are scared and anxious, they might become more dependent, clingy, and afraid to go to bed at night. Whining, aggressive behavior, or toilet accidents may be their way of asking for more comfort from the important adults in their lives. Little by little, as we adults around them become more confident, hopeful and secure, our children can experience a more calming sense of security.

When shocking event happens, it’s easy to get drawn into watching the news for hours and hours. Think back to 9-11 when there was non-stop coverage for days with repeated video of the towers being hit and falling. It created post-traumatic stress disorder, nation-wide. As hard as it is for adults to assimilate, it’s even harder for children. Once you have the information, turn the TV off or find something else for your kids to watch. Monitor their online activity as well to see if they are seeing too much graphic information or too many stories of “What if this happened here?”

Exposing ourselves to so many tragedies can make us feel hopeless, insecure, and even depressed, feelings that even young children can sense. We help our children-and ourselves-if we're able to limit our own television viewing. Our children need us to spend time with them-away from the frightening images on the screen.

Limiting our child’s media exposure doesn’t mean we don’t talk about what has happened with them.

Even if we wanted to, it would be impossible to give our children all the reasons for such things as war, terrorists, abuse, murders, fires, hurricanes, and earthquakes. If very young children ask questions, our best answer may be to ask them, "What do you think happened?" If the answer is, "I don't know," then the simplest reply might be something like, "I'm sad about the news, and I'm worried. But I love you, and I'll take care of you."

If we don't let children know it's okay to feel sad and scared, they may try to hide those feelings or think something is wrong with them whenever they do feel that way. They certainly don't need details of what's making us sad or scared, but if we can help them accept their own feelings as natural and normal, their feelings will be much more manageable for them.

Your child’s age and emotional IQ should be your guide on how much detail you go into when discussing tragic events. Very young children do not need a lot of detail. Children 7 and under are most concerned with safety. They need to know that you and they are secure. That’s why it important to keep the TV at a minimum for kids in this age group. They can identify strongly to pictures of other young children in peril or crying because they’ve lost someone dear to them. At this age, kids are most concerned with separation from you.  Assure them that you are watching out for them and will protect them.

Children between the ages of 8 and 12 will often notice the morality of events.  You may have to explain the basics of prejudice, bias, and civil and religious strife. But be careful about making generalizations, since kids will take you at your word. This is a good time to ask them what they know, since they'll probably have gotten their information from friends, and you may have to correct facts. This age group will most likely be online more. While it’s still important to keep news viewing under control, online viewing and searching should be monitored as well. It’s a good age to discuss lots of views and opinions about events. Read stories together and then ask them what they think.

Teens will probably get their news independently of you. Talking to them can offer great insights into their developing senses of justice and morality. It will also give you the opportunity to throw your own insights into the mix, but don’t dismiss their opinions or insights just because they may not be the same as yours. They will shut down communication quickly if they feel their ideas are not being valued.  Discuss the ways that different media covers events. Again, ask them what they think.

Having to discuss tragic or scary events with our children isn’t new. Generations of parents have had to address various topics from volcano eruptions that wiped out an entire city to the Holocaust to the cold war. But how we get our information has changed dramatically. Media in one form or another is prolific with gory images and misinformation available at the touch of finger. So parents have to react quicker and with more assurance and details than they would probably like. But that’s what we do. We protect our children in all ways, as best we can, with loving and clear information.

Sources:  http://pbskids.org/rogers//parentsteachers/special/scarynews-thoughts.html

Carolyn Knorr, https://www.commonsensemedia.org/blog/explaining-the-news-to-our-kids

 

Your Child

Recall: CLIF Bars, Due to Possible Nut Allergens

2:00

If your child has a nut allergy, and eats CLIF bars, they could accidently ingest one of an assortment of nuts that may have slipped through the manufacturing process.

CLIF Bar and Company is voluntarily recalling 12 of its products that are primarily marketed for children because they may contain several nut allergens.

The bars might contain peanuts, walnuts, almonds, hazelnuts, cashews, Brazil nuts, macadamia nuts, pecans and coconut.

As you know, serious or life-threatening allergic reactions are possible for those with severe allergy to nuts or peanuts. As this time, there have been no reports of illness from this recall.

The bars were sold online and at retail stores throughout the United States. The affected products can be identified by the “Best By” date code found on the back of the individual packaging. You can check the lot codes below:

  • CLIF BUILDER'S 18-count Variety Pack Chocolate Peanut Butter and Chocolate Mint: Lot Code FROM: 24MAR16M; Lot Code TO: 08FEB18M
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein 30-count Variety Pack -- Lot Code FROM: 31MAY16M; Lot Code TO: 15OCT17M
  • CLIF BUILDER'S Chocolate Mint 12-count -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3
  • CLIF BUILDER'S Chocolate Mint 6-pack -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF BUILDER'S Chocolate Mint 7-pack -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF BUILDER'S Snack Size Chocolate Mint 200-count -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein Chocolate Chip 10-pack -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein Chocolate Chip 150-count -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein Chocolate Chip 5-pack -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein Chocolate Mint 10-pack -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein Chocolate Mint 150-count -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 
  • CLIF Kid Zbar Protein Chocolate Mint 5-pack -- Lot Code FROM: 05APR16M3; Lot Code TO: 23APR18M3 

All other CLIF Bar and Company products are not affected by this recall.

The company is asking people to return the products to where they bought them for a refund or exchange. People with questions can call 866-526-1970 or visit the company’s website here.

Story source: Brunilda Nazario, MD http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20170706/clif-bars-recall

http://www.clifbar.com/text/june-2017-recall

Your Child

Lawn Mower Safety Rules Haven’t Prevented Kid's Injuries

2:00

Spring, summer and fall are the times of year when you are most likely to hear the monotonous hum of mower blades echoing throughout neighborhoods.

It’s often the first job a young boy or girl acquires to earn a little extra money, but lawn mowing can come with high risk of injuries when kids and parents don’t follow some simple guidelines.

Despite recommendations presented by AAP, the incidence of lawn mower-related injuries in children has remained unchanged over the last two to three decades.

From 2004-’13, an average of 9,351 youths ages 20 years and younger suffered lawn mower-related injuries each year, according to a review of data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS) of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

About one-third of the wounds occurred in children younger than 12. Two age groups sustained the most injuries, 3 years old and 16 years old and predominately male.

Areas of the body most commonly injured involved hand/fingers ((30%), lower extremity (17%) and face/eye (14%). Amputations and fractures combined accounted for 12.5% of injuries and were more likely to require hospitalization.

Although the incidence of injuries caused by ride-on mowers was 2.5 times higher than those caused by walk-behind mowers, the type of mower was not specified in over 70% of cases, making a true determination of relative risk nearly impossible.   

While fractures and amputations are the most dramatic injuries, they certainly are not the only ones reported. An analysis of NEISS data from 1990-2004 showed the majority of lawn mower injuries were cuts, other soft-tissue injuries and burns.

Also reported in the study were foreign body injuries. It’s hard to imagine, but the rotation of the blades on a typical 26-inch riding lawn mower is similar to the energy required to fire a bullet through the engine block of an automobile, according to the authors. The force certainly is enough to impale objects into a child’s body, even from a good distance away.  

The AAP warns that kids and parents should be aware of the precautions one should take before and during mowing to keep everyone safer.

Here are some mower-safety tips from the AAP:

•       Before learning how to mow the lawn, your child should show the maturity, good judgment, strength and coordination that the job requires. Kids should be at least 12 years of age to operate a walk-behind power mower or hand mower safely and 16 years of age to operate a riding lawn mower safely.

•       Children should be supervised until you are sure he or she can handle the job alone.

•       Wear sturdy closed-toe shoes with slip-proof soles, close-fitting clothes, safety goggles or glasses with side shields, and hearing protection.

•       Watch for objects that could be picked up and thrown by the mower blades, as well as hidden dangers. Tall grass can hide objects, holes or bumps. Use caution when approaching corners, trees or anything that might block your view.

•       If the mower strikes an object, stop, turn the mower off, and inspect the mower. If it is damaged, do not use it until it has been repaired.

•       Do not pull the mower backwards or mow in reverse unless absolutely necessary, and carefully look for children behind you when you mow in reverse.

•       Use extra caution when mowing a slope.

•       When a walk-behind mower is used, mow across the face of slopes, not up and down, to avoid slipping under the mower and into the blades.

•       With a riding mower, mow up and down slopes, not across, to avoid tipping over.

•       Keep in mind that lawn trimmers also can throw objects at high speed.

•       Remain aware of where children are and do not allow them near the area where you are working. Children tend to be attracted to mowers in use.

Stop the engine and allow it to cool before refueling. Always turn off the mower and wait for the blades to stop completely before:

•       Crossing gravel paths, roads or other areas

•       Removing the grass catcher

•       Unclogging the discharge chute

•       Walking away from the mower

Some of the most heartbreaking accidents occur when small children – even infants- are allowed to “ride along” while their parents or grandparents are using a riding mower or small tractor.  U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission statistics show that each year, 800 children are run over by riding mowers or small tractors and more than 600 of those incidents result in amputation; 75 people are killed, and 20,000 injured; one in five deaths involves a child. For children under age 10, major limb loss is most commonly caused by lawn mowers. Never allow a child on a lawn mower or small tractor while you’re using it.

Mowing can be fun, a good source of income for adolescents and a help to families; so make sure to give an ounce of prevention to avoid having to receive a pound of cure.  

Story sources: http://www.aappublications.org/news/2016/08/11/LawnMowers081116

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-home/Pages/Lawnmower-Safety.aspx

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