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Your Child

263,000 iPhone Cases Recalled Due to Burn and Skin Irritations

1:30

About 263,000 MixBin Electronics iPhone cases are being recalled because liquid and glitter can leak out of the cases, causing skin irritation and burns to consumers.

This recall involves all liquid glitter mobile phone cases for iPhone 6, 6s and 7. The cases contain liquid and glitter that are floating in the plastic case. They were sold in various styles and colors and measure about 5.5 inches by 2.75 inches. The model number and UPC can be found on the product's packaging. To view model numbers, UPC codes and photos, please visit: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/MixBin-Electronics-Recalls-iPhone-Cases/

There have been 24 reports worldwide of skin irritation or chemical burns, including 19 in the U.S. One consumer reported permanent scarring from a chemical burn and another consumer reported chemical burns and swelling to her leg, face, neck, chest, upper body and hands. 

The iPhone cases were sold on Amazon and at Henri Bendel, MixBin, Nordstrom Rack, Tory Burch and Victoria's Secret stores nationwide and online from October 2015 through June 2017 for between $15 and $65.

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled cases and contact MixBin Electronics for a full refund.

Consumers can contact MixBin Electronics toll-free at 855-215-4935 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, or online at www.getmixbin.com for more information. 

This recall was conducted voluntarily by the company under CPSC's Fast Track Recall process. Fast Track recalls are initiated by firms who commit to work with CPSC to quickly announce the recall and remedy to protect consumers.

Story source: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/mixbin-electronics-recalls-iphone-cases-due-to-risk-of-skin-irritation-and-burns-300497584.html

Your Child

Helping Children Cope With Frightening News Events

2:30

Gone are the days when most Americans got their news from 3 or 4 sources around the evening dinner hour. Today, thousands of news reports (some real, some fake) instantly flood our phones, computers, TVs and radios, sometimes with real time graphic images.

While some news events may be difficult for even adults to comprehend (with all our life experience and knowledge about current affairs), children don’t have that advantage when they hear and see things that feel threatening to their safety and family stability.

The Journal of American Medical Association, (JAMA) Pediatrics, has published a free online patient’s page dedicated to How to Talk to Your Children About Tragedies in the News.

The amount of information available on current events is almost instant. Sometimes parents don’t have a chance to screen what their children see and hear, so it’s important to know how to talk with your children about what they are experiencing.

The JAMA article is broken down into different age groups. Your approach should differ depending on your child’s age and ability to understand complicated situations.

A good place to start in discussing a tragic event is by asking what your child has already heard. After you listen carefully, you can ask what questions they have. It is important to be honest about what happened and to focus on the basics. It is not necessary to share every detail, and it is important to avoid speculating about what might happen next. Listen closely to your child for misinformation or underlying fears. Remind your child that you are there for him or her and will keep them safe. A key underlying message for parents to convey is, “It is ok if this bothers you; we are here to support each other.”

For very young children, news events can be frightening because they don’t understand context. Children may wonder; is this going to happen to us? Is this happening in our neighborhood? Are my friends ok? Are we next? News media coverage can include graphic images and sounds. It is best to share information with children by discussing it rather than showing the media coverage. Young children may have more questions about whether they are truly safe and may need help separating fantasy from reality. Some children may become clingy or regress in behavior such as wetting the bed or sucking their thumbs. It is important to be patient and to support your child if he or she reacts in this way. Do not ignore your child’s fears or brush them off. Realize that children see the world from a different perspective.

For older children and teenagers, it may be more difficult to avoid exposure to these events in the news. Kids on social media outlets often see stories and videos on their phones while at school or out with friends.- before you have a chance to preview the news. When there is a concerning news event and you have the opportunity, try to preview it before showing it to them so that you know what to expect and what key points to discuss. Then watch it together. Older children and teenagers may want more information about the tragedy and the recovery efforts. They may have opinions about the causes as well as suggestions to prevent future tragedies or a desire to help those in need. Listen to what they say and validate their concerns. If they’ve already seen something tragic, again, ask them what they think about it and talk about their concerns and what they see as a next step in coping.

Other ways you can help your child manage unsettling news are:

  • Be a calm presence. It is okay for children to see adults be sad or cry, but consider excusing yourself if you experience intense emotions.
  • Reassure your child of his or her safety. Consider reviewing your family’s plans for responding to an emergency.
  • Maintain the routine. To give your child a sense of normalcy, keep up your family’s usual dinner, homework, and bedtime routine.
  • Spend extra time together. This can foster your child’s sense of security. Encourage your child to express his or her feelings.
  • When possible, do something to help. Consider ways that you and your family can help survivors and their families.

Like adults, some children may have difficulty with events for a variety of unexpected reasons. Think back to 9-11. How many of us were prepared to watch the towers collapse and the horror and anguish of the families that were missing relatives and friends in the buildings? How we feared that there was a possibility that our country was under attack. It was one of the most devastating events our country has ever experienced in the modern age of instant media information.

Time has helped us put that day in perspective, but the repeated showing of the planes flying into the towers gave many Americans PSTD symptoms. It was almost too much to comprehend. Remember that when your child is scared or anxious about a current event. Help them realize that tragedies do happen, but we can and most often, do survive.

Some signs that a child is not coping well include sleep problems, physical complaints such as feeling tired, having a headache or stomachache, or just feeling unwell. Changes in behavior may include regressive behavior such as acting more immature or being less patient, and mental health concerns like sadness or heightened depression or anxiety. Sometimes it can be hard to tell if a child is reacting in a typical way to a tragic event or if there is something else going on.

Talk with your child’s pediatrician if you are concerned about your child’s reaction.

These are uncertain times. Everyone seems to be a bit on edge, wondering when the next shoe will drop. Have a plan on how to talk to your youngster about current events. Most of all have patience and be a good example of calmness and reassurance; that no matter what happens, you have their best interests at heart.

Story source: http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/2646851

 

Your Child

Young Kids Overdosing on Dietary Supplements

2:00

It’s no surprised that the majority of American adults now take one or more dietary supplement daily. During the last decade, many households have switched from a simple multivitamin to more specific supplements for different dietary needs. It’s become a billion dollar industry even though many scientific studies have shown mixed results on the effectiveness of supplements on a person’s health.

What may surprise you though is the number of children that are accidently overdosing on dietary supplements found in the home. Children under the age of 6 are the most affected.

A typical scenario might play out like this.  A curious toddler opens a bottle of melatonin found on the kitchen counter, and accidentally overdoses on a supplement typically used by adults to help with sleep.

In that case, the doctor who treats the child may only have to deal with a very tired 3-year- old, but it might have been a far more serious scenario if a different dietary supplement, such as the energy product ephedra or the male enhancement herb yohimbe, had been swallowed.

"We see it all the time," said Dr. Barbara Pena, research director of the emergency medicine department at Nicklaus Children's Hospital in Miami.

From 2005 through 2012, the annual rate of accidental exposures to dietary supplements rose in the United States by nearly 50 percent, and 70 percent of those exposures involved young children.

"The biggest increase [in accidental overdoses] was in children under 6. It got our attention," said study author Henry Spiller, director of the Central Ohio Poison Center of Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus. Ninety-seven percent of the time, the children swallowed the supplements while at home, the study found.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate dietary supplements, so there is no guarantee that the ingredients listed have been tested or that they are what they claim to be. The FDA can only take action if the supplements are shown to cause harm.

During the 13 years of the study, Spiller's team also found an increase from 2000 to 2002, when the rates of calls to U.S. poison control centers involving supplements rose 46 percent each year. From 2002 to 2005, the researchers found the rates of calls declined. Spiller suspects that is because the FDA banned ephedra in 2004, after supplements containing it had been linked with adverse heart events and deaths.

Overall, only about 4.5 percent of the cases in the study had serious medical outcomes. During the 13-year period tracked, 34 deaths were attributed to supplement exposure, Spiller said.

The supplements most often associated with the greatest toxicity were ephedra (ma huang,) yohimbe (found in male enhancement supplements and other products) and energy drinks and drugs.

Ephedra is now banned, but yohimbe is not. Nearly 30 percent of yohimbe exposure calls in the study resulted in moderate or major harm. Yohimbe can cause heartbeat rhythm changes, kidney failure, seizures, heart attack and death, the researchers noted.

Often, children find the supplements on a kitchen counter, Spiller said. Parents and others may equate dietary supplements with being natural, and therefore safe. Parents usually don't keep track of how many pills are left in a supplement bottle, he said, making it more difficult to tell poison control staff how many pills were taken in an accidental exposure.

Adolescents are also susceptible to overdosing on energy products loaded with caffeine and other ingredients that can cause abnormal heart rhythms or even a heart attack. 

Both Spiller and Pena suggest that parents and caregivers treat supplements the same way they do prescriptions or O-T-C drugs.  Keep all supplements in a locked cabinet or on a high closed shelf if young children are in the house or likely to visit.

Supplements are especially scary, Pena noted, because it's not always possible to know the potency of the product.

The study was published in the Journal of Medical Toxicology.

Story source: Kathleen Doheny, http://www.webmd.com/children/news/20170725/us-kids-overdosing-on-dietary-supplements#1

Your Child

FDA Warning: High Lead Levels in Herbal Remedy

2:00

The Food and Drug Administration is issuing a warning to parents and caregivers about high lead levels found in the herbal remedy, Balguti Kasaria Ayurvedic Medicine.

The herbal remedy is marketed for use in infants and children for various conditions such as rickets, cough and cold, worms, and teething. According to the product packaging, the product claims to help with digestion and bowel movement and improve the immune system.

The North Carolina Division of Public Health first reported high levels of lead after testing the product.

In addition, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services notified the FDA that two children were found to have high levels of lead associated with the use of this product. The families of the children affected stated that they had the product mailed to them from India. At this time, the FDA has received one report of developmental delays in a child who was administered this product.   

Ayurvedic medicine is one of the world's oldest holistic healing systems. It was developed more than 3,000 years ago in India.

It’s based on the belief that health and wellness depend on a delicate balance between the mind, body, and spirit. Its main goal is to promote good health, not fight disease. But treatments may be geared toward specific health problems.

In the United States, it’s considered a form of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM).

Parents and caregivers should familiarize themselves with the symptoms of lead poisoning. High lead levels have also been found in toys, costume jewelry and other products that children use.

The symptoms are:

  • Developmental delay
  • Learning difficulties
  • Irritability
  • Loss of appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Sluggishness and fatigue
  • Abdominal pain
  • Vomiting
  • Constipation
  • Hearing loss
  • Seizures
  • Eating things, such as paint chips, that aren't food (pica)

Lead poisoning symptoms in newborns - Babies exposed to lead before birth might:

  • Be born prematurely
  • Have lower birth weight
  • Have slowed growth

The FDA is urging parents and caregivers to stop giving the product to children and to consult a healthcare professional. Balguti Kesaria is sold online and made by different companies, including Kesari Ayurvedic Pharmacy in India. The product has also been mailed or brought into the United States.

Story sources: Da Hee Han, PharmD, http://www.empr.com/safety-alerts-and-recalls/balguti-kesaria-ayurvedic-medicine-high-lead-levels/article/680132/

http://www.webmd.com/balance/guide/ayurvedic-treatments#1

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/lead-poisoning/symptoms-causes/dxc-20275054

Your Child

Protecting Your Child From Harmful Sun Rays

2:00

With longer daylight hours and summer knocking at the door, it’s only natural that kids will be spending more time outside in the sun.  With skin cancers on the rise in young people, many parents are concerned about their children getting too much sun exposure.

Parents may be worried, but teens and younger kids often think skin cancer is something that only happens to older adults. But the facts tell a different story.

Melanoma (the most dangerous type of skin cancer) is one of the most common cancers in young adults, especially young women, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). It’s the leading cause of cancer death in women ages 25 to 30, according to the Melanoma Research Foundation and since the 1970s, cases of melanoma have increased by 250% in children and young adults, according to a 2011 study.

Skin cancers take time to develop. Just a few serious sunburns can increase your child’s risk of skin cancer later in life. Kids don’t have to be at the pool, beach, or on vacation to get too much sun.

Knowing the facts about skin cancer doesn’t mean that your child can’t play or spend time outside, but by following a few simple sun-protection rules kids can still have fun enjoying the great outdoors.

Sunscreen: The number one protection from sunburn and skin damage is sunscreen. An SPF, or sun protection factor, indicates a sunscreen's effectiveness at preventing sunburn. "If your child's skin reddens in 10 minutes without sunscreen, SPF 15 multiplies that time (10 minutes) by 15, meaning she'd be protected from sunburn for approximately 150 minutes or 2 1/2 hours," says Sancy Leachman, M.D., Ph.D., director of the Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology Program at the University of Utah's Huntsman Cancer Institute in Salt Lake City.

This all depends on good application, so make sure your child’s skin is evenly covered. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends using sunscreens with at least an SPF of 15, which blocks 93 percent of UVB rays. Higher SPFs provide even greater protection, but only to a certain point: SPF 30 blocks 97 percent of UVB and SPF 50+ (the maximum SPF you'll find on sunscreen labels due to new Food and Drug Administration (FDA) rules) blocks 98 percent.

Shade: UV rays are strongest and most harmful during midday. If your child is outside during this time, if possible- seek shade under a tree, an umbrella or pop-up tent,

Cover up: When possible wear lightweight long sleeves and pants. Clothes made from tightly woven fabric offer the best protection. A wet T-shirt offers much less UV protection than a dry one, and darker colors may offer more protection than lighter colors. Some clothing certified under international standards comes with information on its ultraviolet protection factor.

Sunglasses: They protect your child’s eyes from UV rays, which can lead to cataracts later in life. Look for sunglasses that wrap around and block as close to 100% of both UVA and UVB rays as possible.

Wear a hat: The trend in wearing baseball or gimme caps is actually working out in favor of protecting kids’ faces and heads from UV rays. While the caps are helpful, they don’t protect necks and ears, so make sure these areas have plenty of sunscreen as well as the face.

Sunny days are not the only time kids need skin protection. UV rays, not the temperature, do the damage. Clouds do not block UV rays, they filter them—and sometimes only slightly.

And, remember to plan ahead, and keep sun protection handy—in your car, bag, or child’s backpack.

Story sources: https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/basic_info/children.htm

Jeannette Moninger, http://www.parents.com/kids/safety/outdoor/sun-care-basics/

Your Child

Back-to-School Wellness Checkup

2:00

A new school year is coming up fast and now is the time to make sure your child has a wellness physical.

If you take care of school-aged children, you know that’s just one reason to schedule a back-to-school physical. Your school district will have specific guidelines; for some, the annual physical is mandatory. Most districts also need proof of up-to-date immunizations before your child can enter certain grades.

Setting aside time for a general health checkup will allow the doctor to thoroughly assess your child’s physical and psycho-social development, and provide an opportunity to answer your questions. Check your health insurance for well visits to make sure you’re covered. You can also see what the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends for a wellness physical at https://www.aap.org/en-us/Pages/Default.aspx.

What can you expect from a back-to-school checkup?

The physical aspect of the exam should include an assessment of:

  • Spinal alignment to rule out scoliosis.
  • Eyes, ears, nose, skin, and mouth for any abnormalities that may need follow-up
  • Fine and gross motor development
  • Height and weight
  • Blood pressure and heart rate
  • Reflexes

Children at risk for lead poisoning or tuberculosis may be screened for those issues, and kids who are overweight or with a family history of high cholesterol may have their cholesterol checked.

Sexually active teenagers should be screened for sexually transmitted diseases, and girls should have a pelvic exam. Your doctor should also talk to older children about what to expect as their bodies begin to change at puberty.

While your at the doctor’s office, have them look at your child’s immunization records to make sure everything is up to date. If not, see if your child can get the necessary vaccines.

Sometimes, a psychological and behavioral exam, based on the child’s age, is included. The doctor should ask questions about school performance, including achievements or difficulties, and also about friendships and socialization.

Expect that your doctor may also talk about injury prevention, such as requiring your child to wear a bike helmet and protective gear when playing sports; safely storing firearms in your home; and making wise health decisions regarding drugs, alcohol, and tobacco.

Before visiting the pediatrician:

  • Make a list of the questions you want to ask. It’s easy to forget some of your questions once you’re in the office.
  • Remind your doctor if your child is homeschooled so they will include vision and hearing screenings in the visit (these are typically done at school).
  • Request age-appropriate nutrition counseling if you have a family history of heart disease, diabetes, or obesity or weight issues.
  • Direct your young athlete’s exam toward sports issues, such as training, nutrition, and exercise, and ask about signs of overuse injuries.
  • Maintain a regular schedule of well visits so your child will develop a trusting relationship with your pediatrician. This will enhance continuity of care, and the doctor will be able to assess conditions more readily because they’ll have a well-established baseline of information about your child.

Many schools will begin classes by late August or early September. Now’s the time to make sure your little one is all set to go!

Story source: Lynda Shrager, http://www.everydayhealth.com/columns/lynda-shrager-the-organized-caregiver/5-tips-for-a-successful-back-to-school-checkup/

Your Child

Teeth Grinding and Children

2:00

When parents check in on their sleeping child, the grinding sound of teeth is not what they expect to hear.  While it may be a bit unsettling for parents, it’s not uncommon. 

The medical term for this condition is called bruxism and 2 to 3 out of every 10 kids will grind their teeth or clench their jaws during sleep, according to experts.

Bruxism often occurs during deep sleep phases or when kids are under stress.

None knows for sure why bruxism happens. In some cases, kids may grind because the top and bottom teeth aren't aligned properly. Others do it as a response to pain, such as from an earache or teething. Kids might grind their teeth as a way to ease the pain, just as they might rub a sore muscle. Many kids outgrow these fairly common causes for grinding.

Children under stress may also grind their teeth or clench their jaw. Worry over a test or a change in routine can be released through teeth grinding during sleep. More serious family problems or being the recipient of bullying can prompt bruxism. Some kids who are hyperactive also have bruxism. And sometimes kids with other medical conditions (such as cerebral palsy) or who take certain medicines can develop bruxism.

The suspected reasons are many.

The effects of undetected teeth grinding can vary as well. Sometimes, kids have little or no effect from light teeth grinding.  However, other children may experience headaches or earaches. In some cases, nighttime grinding and clenching can wear down tooth enamel, chip teeth, increase temperature sensitivity, and cause severe facial pain and jaw problems, such as temporomandibular joint disease (TMJ).  Most kids who grind, however, don't have TMJ problems unless their grinding and clenching happen a lot.

Most of the time kids aren’t aware that they are grinding their teeth. A sibling or parent usually discovers it.

What should you do if your child has bruxism? You can talk with pediatrician about it and a visit to the dentist is a good idea. Your dentist can check for chipped enamel and unusual wear and tear on your child’s teeth as well as misaligned teeth.

Most children will outgrow bruxism, but a combination of parental observation and dental visits can help keep the problem in check until they do.

If your child’s grinding and clenching is caused by, or is causing, a dental problem, the dentist may prescribe a special mouth guard that is worn at night. It looks similar to protective mouthpieces worn by athletes. While it may take a little time to get used to, positive results typically happen quickly.

For bruxism that's caused by stress, ask about what's upsetting your child and find a way to help. For example, a kid who is worried about being away from home for a first camping trip might need reassurance that mom or dad will be nearby if needed.

If the issue is more complicated, such as moving to a new town, discuss your child's concerns and try to ease any fears. Talk to your pediatrician if you’re concerned that your child may need professional help with discussing what is bothering him or her.

In rare cases, basic stress relievers aren't enough to stop bruxism. If your child has trouble sleeping or is acting differently than usual, your dentist or doctor may suggest further evaluation. This can help find the cause of the stress and a proper course of treatment.

Because some bruxism is a child's natural reaction to growth and development, most cases can't be prevented. Stress-induced bruxism can be avoided, though. So talk with kids regularly about their feelings and help them deal with stress. Taking kids for routine dental visits can help find and treat bruxism.

Story source: Kenneth H. Hirsch, DDS, http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/bruxism.html#

Your Child

Trampoline Safety Tips

2:00

Trampolines are a lot of fun and great exercise, but they also come with risks for injuries.  All the hopping, bouncing and tumbling can sometimes lead to accidents, particularly if more than one child is on the trampoline. The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has released a list of safety precautions parents should take if there is a trampoline at the house.

The AAOS and the AAP both say that children 6 years and younger should not be allowed on trampolines.

"Children younger than age 6 are less likely to have the coordination, body awareness and swift reaction time necessary to keep their bodies, bones and brains safe on trampolines," said Dr. Jennifer Weiss, a Los Angeles pediatric orthopedic surgeon and academy spokesperson.

The most common injuries children suffer on trampolines are sprains and fractures caused by falls on the trampoline mat, frame or springs. Collisions with other jumpers; stunts gone wrong; and falls off the trampoline onto the ground or other hard surfaces, are also injuries physicians see.

Landing wrong can cause serious or permanent injuries even when the trampoline has a net and padding. The majority of injuries occur when there is more than one person on the trampoline.

The AAP doesn’t recommend that parents buy a home trampoline, but if you decide to have one, they offer these safety guidelines:

  • Adult supervision at all times
  • Only one jumper on the trampoline at a time
  • No somersaults performed 
  • Adequate protective padding on the trampoline that is in good condition and appropriately placed
  • Check all equipment often 
  • When damaged, protective padding, the net enclosure, and any other parts should be repaired or replaced

The AAOS adds these safety precautions:

  • Place the trampoline-jumping surface at ground level. Remove trampoline ladders after use to prevent unsupervised use by young children.
  • Regularly inspect equipment and throw away worn or damaged equipment if you can't get replacement parts.
  • Don't rely on safety net enclosures for injury prevention because most injuries occur on the trampoline surface. Check that supporting bars, strings and surrounding landing surfaces have adequate protective padding that's in good condition.
  • Close adult supervision, proper safety measures and instruction are crucial when a trampoline is used for physical education, competitive gymnastics, diving training and similar activities.
  • Have spotters present when participants are jumping. Do not allow somersaults or high-risk maneuvers unless there is proper supervision, instruction and protective equipment such as a harness.

Another tip that the AAP offers trampoline owners is to check their homeowner’s insurance policy to obtain a rider to cover trampoline-related injuries if not included in the basic policy.

Story sources: Robert Preidt, https://consumer.healthday.com/fitness-information-14/trampolining-health-news-285/surgeons-warn-of-trampolines-down-side-724795.html

https://healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/at-play/Pages/Trampolines-What-You-Need-to-Know.aspx

 

Your Child

Testing Your Child for Hearing Problems

1:30

Hearing well is critical to a child’s social, emotional and cognitive development.  When hearing problems are diagnosed early, most are treatable. So it’s important to have your little one’s hearing tested, ideally by the time your baby is 3 months old.

Hearing loss is more common that you’d probably expect. It affects about 1 to 3 babies out of every 1,000.

Although many things can lead to hearing loss, about half the time, no cause is found.

Hearing loss can occur if a child:

•       Was born prematurely

•       Stayed in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU)

•       Had newborn jaundice with bilirubin level high enough to require a blood transfusion

•       Was given medications that can lead to hearing loss

•       Has family members with childhood hearing loss

•       Had certain complications at birth

•       Had many ear infections

•       Had infections such as meningitis or cytomegalovirus

•       Was exposed to very loud sounds or noises, even briefly

When should your child be evaluated for hearing loss? Newborns should have a hearing screening before being discharged from the hospital. Every state and territory in the U.S. has a program called Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI). The program identifies every child with permanent hearing loss before 3 months of age, and provides intervention services before 6 months of age. If your baby doesn't have this screening, or was born at home or a birthing center, it's important to have a hearing screening within the first 3 weeks of life.

If your newborn doesn't pass the initial hearing screening, it's important to get a retest within 3 months so treatment can begin right away. Treatment for hearing loss can be the most effective if it's started before a child is 6 months old.

Children who seem to have normal hearing should continue to have their hearing evaluated at regular doctor’s appointments from ages 4 to 10 years of age.

If your child seems to have trouble hearing, if speech development seems abnormal, or if your child's speech is difficult to understand, talk with your doctor.

Even if your newborn passes the hearing screening, continue to watch for signs that hearing is normal. Some hearing milestones your child should reach in the first year of life:

•       Most newborn infants startle or "jump" to sudden loud noises.

•       By 3 months, a baby usually recognizes a parent's voice.

•       By 6 months, a baby can usually turn his or her eyes or head toward a sound.

•       By 12 months, a baby can usually imitate some sounds and produce a few words, such as "Mama" or "bye-bye."

As your baby grows into a toddler, signs of a hearing loss may include:

•       Limited, poor, or no speech

•       Frequently inattentive

•       Difficulty learning

•       Seems to need higher TV volume

•       Fails to respond to conversation-level speech or answers inappropriately to speech

•       Fails to respond to his or her name or easily frustrated when there's a lot of background noise 

There are several ways your child’s hearing can be tested depending on his or her age, development and health.

During behavioral tests, an audiologist carefully watches a child respond to sounds like calibrated speech (speech that is played with a particular volume and intensity) and pure tones. A pure tone is a sound with a very specific pitch (frequency), like a note on a keyboard.

An audiologist may know an infant or toddler is responding by his or her eye movements or head turns. A preschooler may move a game piece in response to a sound, and a grade-schooler may raise a hand. Children can respond to speech with activities like identifying a picture of a word or repeating words softly.

Doctors can also examine a child for hearing loss by looking at how well his or her ear, nerves and brain are functioning.

If a hearing problem is suspected, a pediatric audiologist specializing in testing and helping kids with hearing loss can be contacted. They work closely with doctors, teachers, and speech/language pathologists.

Audiologists have a lot of specialized training. They have a Masters or Doctorate degree in audiology, have performed internships, and are certified by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (CCC-A) or are Fellows of the American Academy of Audiology (F-AAA).

Children with certain types of hearing loss have several options for treatment. They may be helped with surgery or hearing aids. The most common type of hearing loss involves outer hair cells that do not work properly. Hearing aids can make sounds louder and overcome this problem.

A cochlear implant is a surgical treatment for hearing loss; this device doesn't cure hearing loss, but is a device that gets placed into the inner ear to send sound directly to the hearing nerve. It can help children with profound hearing loss who do not benefit from hearing aids.

Making sure that your child is hearing well is one of the first steps you can take to helping him or her do well socially, academically and developmentally.

Story source: Thierry Morlet, PhD, Rupal Christine Gupta, MD,

http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/hear.html

 

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