Twitter Facebook RSS Feed Print
Your Baby

1 Egg a Day Improves Growth in Babies

1:30

While not as common in the United States, an astounding number of children worldwide suffer from stunted growth; mainly due to malnutrition or disease. It is a serious problem that impacts about 162 million children under the age of 5.

A new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St Louis, suggests that just one egg daily may significantly increase growth and reduce stunting in children.

"Eggs have the potential to contribute to reduced growth stunting around the world. They are also a good source of nutrients for growth and development in young children," said Lora Iannotti, an author and researcher in the Washington University study.

Researchers gave eggs to 80 infants between six and nine months of age for one year. Another 84 weren’t given eggs and served as a control group. Compared to these controls, the egg-eating youngsters had a 47 percent lower prevalence of stunting, which is defined as being too short for one’s age. Their length-for-age measurement also shot up by a significant margin.

Why would a daily egg have such a dramatic effect? Eggs are often referred to as “the perfect food.” They contain all of the necessary amino acids, as well as choline, various growth factors and DHA, a polyunsaturated fatty acid important for the brain. All of these are necessary for proper growth and development, and the normal function of the body.

There has been some concern in the past, that eggs may raise an infant’s cholesterol level or induce an allergic reaction.  However, research has not shown these hypotheses not to be true. The food appears to be safe and healthy for infants, says Iannotti.

Eggs are easily available for parents and affordable as a food option. Lots of families are even experimenting with raising chickens for their eggs in communities across the country.

Iannotti believes this study shows that just one egg a day could have a dramatic impact, globally, on the number of children suffering from stunted growth.

The study was published in the June edition of the journal Pediatrics.

Story sources: Pawel Kopczynski / Reuters, http://www.newsweek.com/one-egg-day-boosts-growth-infants-621266

Neil Schoenherr, https://source.wustl.edu/2017/06/eggs-can-significantly-increase-growth-young-children/

Your Baby

Is Your Baby Safer Sleeping in a Box?

2:00

Is your baby safer sleeping in a box instead of a crib? Some parents think so and are ditching the traditional infant crib for a specially made cardboard box.

The Baby Box Co., is a Los-Angeles based business that is partnering with hospitals across the U.S. to give away free “baby boxes” to new parents.

The parents also receive a 15- minute educational video about safe sleeping habits for infants. Also included in the box are infant clothing, a mattress, a fitted sheet plus $150 worth of baby necessities.

While relatively novel in the U.S., the baby-box isn’t a new idea.  It’s modeled after a program in Finland that began more than 70 years ago. Baby boxes are aimed at curbing infant mortality rates by promoting safe sleeping practices for newborns.

New Jersey adopted the first statewide baby box program; distributing a total of 105,000 boxes. And now, Ohio has joined up, along with hospitals in Philadelphia and San Antonio, Texas.

Proponents of baby boxes say the combination of educational tools and free resources will bring America's infant mortality rate closer to those found in wealthy Nordic countries.

The goal of the Baby Box program is to bring the rate of children dying from Sudden Infant Death syndrome (SIDS) down. SIDS is usually attributed to sleep-related accidents such as strangulation, suffocation or entrapment. In 2015, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) reported about 3,700 infants died from SIDS.

The U.S. saw a drastic decline in its infant mortality rate since 1994, when the CDC launched its "Back to Sleep" campaign urging parents to have their infants sleep on their backs rather than stomachs, but disadvantaged groups still tend to be affected by SIDS more than others.

In Finland, Baby Boxes have had a dramatic impact on infant mortality since the program was launched in 1949. In the 1930s, the country's infant mortality rate was 65 deaths per 1,000 infants. Beginning in 1949, that number has shrunk to 3.5 deaths per 1,000 births— a decrease that's credited in part to baby boxes. Comparatively, the United States had an infant mortality rate of about 5.8 deaths per 1,000 births in 2016.

One University of Chicago study found that primarily lower socioeconomic groups drive the higher infant mortality rate in the U.S. after the mother and child leave the hospital. Contributing factors may include health coverage insurance and the mother’s amount of education.

What else can be done to curb infant mortality rates?

Some experts argue that policies geared toward enhanced post neonatal care for mothers of low socioeconomic status would be most effective in combating the U.S. infant mortality rate.

Universal home nurse visits, available in a number of European countries such as Finland and Austria, are one option. A provision of the Affordable Care Act offers money for a number of similar programs, such as the Nurse Family Partnership founded in 1977 in New York.

The program, which sought to rein in infant deaths in the U.S., provides low-income, first-time mothers with registered nurses who visit their homes to provide assistance and child health education for mothers.

According to the Baby Box Co. website, Baby Boxes are not only available through some hospitals, but also direct to consumer.

Story source: Avalon Zoppo, http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/hospitals-u-s-give-away-free-baby-boxes-curb-infant-n732421

http://www.babyboxco.com

Your Baby

Why Do Babies Eyes Change Color?

1:30

Close to the top of questions many parent’s have about their newborn is what color will my baby’s eyes be?

It’ll take a while before you actually know your baby’s true eye color. That’s because eye color is a genetic trait that depends on several factors. While your baby may have gray or blue eyes at birth, his or her eyes may eventually be brown, blue, green, hazel, gray, violet or even a combination of colors. 

Parents' genes can mix and match in many different ways. The influences from each parent aren't known until after the baby is born. Eye color traits also include grandparents. A brown-eyed mother and father can have a child with blue eyes if there are blue eyes in his or her genetic history.

The colored part of the eye is called the iris, which has pigmentation that determines our eye color.

Human eye color originates with three genes, two of which are well understood. These genes account for the most common colors — green, brown, and blue.

Most babies are born with blue or gray eyes that can darken in their first three years.

Iris color, just like hair and skin color, depends on a protein called melanin. We have specialized cells in our bodies called melanocytes whose job it is to go around secreting melanin where it’s needed, including in the iris. When your baby is born his eyes will be gray or blue since melanocytes respond to light and he has spent his whole life in the dark.

Over time, if melanocytes only secrete a little melanin, your baby will have blue eyes. If they secrete a bit more, his eyes will look green or hazel. When melanocytes get really busy, eyes look brown (the most common eye color), and in some cases they may appear very dark indeed. Because it takes about a year for melanocytes to finish their work it can be a dicey business calling eye color before the baby’s first birthday. The color change does slow down some after the first 6 months of life, but there can be plenty of change left at that point.

We used to think of brown being "dominant" and blue being "recessive." But modern science has shown that eye color is not at all that simple.

Children can have completely different eye colors than either of their parents. But if both parents have brown eyes, it's most likely that their children also will have brown eyes.

The darker colors tend to dominate, so brown typically wins out over green, and green tends to win out over blue.

Eye color is one of those interesting things that pique our curiosity, but no matter what color your baby’s eyes end up being; they’ll be beautiful because they belong to your special little one!

Story sources: David L Hill MD,FAAP,  https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/Pages/Newborn-Eye-Color.aspx

Burt Dubow, OD, http://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/eye-color.htm

Your Baby

Babies Sleeping in Their Own Room, Sleep Longer

2:00

Many parents choose to have their newborn sleep in the same room as they do, so a common question is what is the right age to move baby into his or her own room? The answer may depend on who you ask. 

The American Academy of Pediatrics (APP) recommends that babies share their parents’ room – but not their bed- for at least 6 months and preferably, until their first birthday. The guidelines are meant to lower the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, which may occur while an infant is sleeping.

But if you are ready for your little one to sleep for longer periods of time, then a new study suggests moving your baby into his or her own room by 4 months of age.

For the study, Dr. Ian Paul, the chief of academic general pediatrics at Penn State College of Medicine. analyzed surveys from 230 first-time mothers. He found that babies slept for longer stretches if they didn't sleep in the same bedroom as their parents.

At 4 months, babies who slept alone had the longest stretches of uninterrupted sleep -- by about 45 minutes, on average -- though they slept about the same amount of time as babies who slept in their parents' rooms.

At 9 months, babies in their own rooms slept 40 minutes longer at night and over 20 minutes longer overall, compared with those who were still sharing a room with their parents. Those differences disappeared at 12 months but reappeared later. When the researchers followed up at 2½ years, toddlers who began sleeping alone by 9 months slept 45 minutes longer per night, though total sleep time was roughly the same.

As most parents can attest to, when a baby doesn’t sleep well it has an impact on the parents’ stress level and mental health. Paul notes that he believes the AAP recommendation is excessive and that most parents are ready for a room to themselves before 6 months to a year. "Most parents don't want their baby sleeping in their room until 1 year," Paul said. "I've got three of them myself."

Some experts also agree that moving an infant out of the parents' bedroom sooner could help babies sleep better before they develop separation anxiety, said Paul.

The difference in recommendations has led to tension between the two groups.

"This is important information," said Dr. Rachel Moon, a professor of pediatrics at the University of Virginia who co-authored the AAPs’ latest recommendation. "We don't have enough info about downstream effects about what we've recommended."

Moon, a SIDS researcher, cautioned in response to Paul's study that just because sleep is uninterrupted doesn't mean it's better. 

"We think that a lot of the problems with SIDS is that babies don't arouse," she said, adding that if babies sleep too deeply or for too long, some experts believe this could put them at risk.

Room sharing has been estimated to lower the risk of SIDS by as much as to 50%, according to the report Moon co-authored.

The researchers also found other differences between babies that slept in their own room and those that shared a room with their parents: Infants who slept in a room alone were also more likely to have a consistent bedtime routine, and they were more likely to go to bed by 8 p.m. Babies that shared a room were more likely to have something in their bed that shouldn’t be there, such as a blanket, pillow or stuffed animal, and were more likely to be brought into their parents’ bed sometime in the night. Both of which have been linked to sudden infant death, including by suffocation.

Instead of changing the guidelines, Moon said, doctors can use the new study to give better guidance to room-sharing parents who may be more likely to bring their baby into bed overnight, putting them at risk.

"If we know that this is happening, then we can do a better job of providing proactive guidance for families," she said.

If you’re still confused about when to move your little one into his or her room, talk with your pediatrician, for guidance, about any concerns or questions you have.

Story sources: Michael Nedelman, CNN http://www.cnn.com/2017/06/05/health/babies-room-sharing-study/index.html

 

Your Baby

Study: Preemies Do Well in School

1:45

Parents of premature babies often worry how their child will do academically later in life. A new study may ease their minds.

Researchers followed more than 1.3 million premature babies born in Florida and found that two-thirds of those born at only 23 or 24 weeks were ready for kindergarten on time, and almost 2 percent of those infants later achieved gifted status in school.

Though extremely premature babies often scored low on standardized tests, preterm infants born 25 weeks or later performed only slightly lower than full-term infants. For babies born after 28 weeks, the differences in test scores were negligible.

"We know a lot about the medical and clinical outcomes [of premature babies] and we know some about short-term educational outcomes, but what we didn't know is how the babies do once they get further out into elementary school and middle school," the study's first author Dr. Craig Garfield, associate professor of pediatrics and of medical social sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, told CBS News.

The babies were born in Florida from 1992 to 2002 with gestational ages of 23 to 41 weeks who later entered Florida public schools between 1995 and 2012. The scope of the study included a diverse group of children with varied backgrounds and economic status.

The study did not include additional research possibly connected to the children’s development such as medical issues related to premature birth, or information about factors that may have helped these children perform well in school, such as their biological makeup or if they got extra support from family or school programs.

"This is a really large group of children," Garfield said. "A lot of studies are done in a select group, but the population in this study is really all the babies that were born and lived up to one year in Florida and we were able to follow them through the education system to eighth grade."

Senior author David Figlio, director of the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University, acknowledges concerns that very premature infants (those born between 22 and 24 weeks of pregnancy) tend to score well below their full-term peers on standardized tests. However, he said he believes "the glass is more than half-full."

"Most infants born at 23 to 24 weeks still demonstrate a high degree of cognitive functioning at the start of kindergarten and throughout school," he said in a statement.

The study is good news for parents already consumed with uncertainty about the future of their premature infant – something they need during a very difficult time.

Story source: Ashley Welch, http://www.cbsnews.com/news/premature-babies-preemies-catch-up-in-school-study/

Your Baby

Obese During Pregnancy Linked to Obesity in Offspring

2:00

Not every time, but often, you’ll see obese couples and their kids are either obese or on the threshold of obesity. While adults have the power and the life experience to understand the health issues associated with obesity, their children – depending on their age- are reliant on on their parents making healthy choices for them.  

 Is generational obesity inherited or a case of families making poor choices where food and exercise are concerned – or both?

Researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine wondered if children born to obese moms might be predisposed to being obese due to their womb environment.

The team of scientists analyzed stem cells taken from the umbilical cords of babies born to normal weight and obese mothers. In the lab, they coaxed these stem cells to develop into muscle and fat. The resulting cells from obese mothers had 30% more fat than those from normal weight mothers, suggesting that these babies’ cells were more likely to accumulate fat.

No cause and effect was established, but the scientists noted that further research was needed. “The next step is to follow these offspring to see if there is a lasting change into adulthood,” says the lead presenter, Kristen Boyle, in a statement.

She and her colleagues are already studying the cells to see whether they use and store energy any differently from those obtained from normal-weight mothers, and whether those changes result in metabolic differences such as inflammation or insulin resistance, which can precede heart disease and diabetes.

Other studies have found a high correlation between parents’ Body Mass Index (BMI) numbers and their children ‘s BMI, particularly between mothers and their kids. Further, the BMI of grandmother’s and their grandchildren is also high.

What is a healthy weight gain for a pregnant woman? It depends on how much you weigh before getting pregnant.

The guidelines for pregnancy weight gain are issued by the Institute of Medicine (IOM); most recently in May 2009. Here are the most current recommendations:

•       If your pre-pregnancy weight was in the healthy range for your height (a BMI of 18.5 to 24.9), you should gain between 25 and 35 pounds, gaining 1 to 5 pounds in the first trimester and about 1 pound per week for the rest of your pregnancy for the optimal growth of your baby.

•       If you were underweight or your height at conception (a BMI below 18.5), you should gain 28 to 40 pounds.

•       If you were overweight for your height (a BMI of 25 to 29.9), you should gain 15 to 25 pounds. If you were obese (a BMI of 30 or higher), you should gain between 11 and 20 pounds.

•       If you're having twins, you should gain 37 to 54 pounds if you started at a healthy weight, 31 to 50 pounds if you were overweight, and 25 to 42 pounds if you were obese.

These recent findings point out again, how important it is for pregnant women to consider the possible long - term health affects on their unborn offspring when making decisions about their own health.

The report was presented in May to the American Diabetes Association.

Sources: Alice Park, http://time.com/3906135/obese-moms-wire-kids-obesity-during-pregnancy/

http://www.babycenter.com/0_pregnancy-weight-gain-what-to-expect_1466.bc

 

Your Baby

Recall: Tommee Tippee Electric Bottle and Food Warmers Due to Fire Hazard

1:30

Mayborn USA is recalling about 255,000 Tommee Tippee electric bottle and food warmers because they could overheat and catch fire, according to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

This recall involves Tommee Tippee® Closer to Nature® electric bottle and food warmers, sold separately or as an accessory with the Complete Starter Kit or the All in One Newborn Set. The bottle and food warmer is white with a gray adjustable control dial located next to the on/off light. Tommee Tippee is stamped in gray on the front of the unit. It measures about 5 inches high, 5 ½ inches wide and 5 inches long. Bottle and food warmers included on this recall have “Min” or “0” stamped on the left-hand side of the control dial and have the UL logo and a six alpha-numeric batch code that begins with a number and ends with “GY” stamped on the underside. Consumers should visit www.tommeetippee.us/bottle-warmer to complete the free replacement registration form.

The firm has received six reports of bottle and food warmers overheating, melting, smoking and catching on fire; which resulted in $16,000 in property damage.

Consumers should immediately unplug and stop using the recalled bottle and food warmers and contact Mayborn for free replacement warmers.  

The product was sold at merchandise stores including Baby Depot, Baby Heaven, Bealls Outlet, BuyBuy Baby, CVS, Giant, Ideal Baby and Kids, Kohl’s, Marco Baby, Marshalls, Meijer, Ross Stores, Sam’s Club, Target, TJ Maxx, Toys R Us, Walgreens and Wal-Mart nationwide and online at Amazon.com, Diapers.com, Drugstore.com and Quidsi.com from July 2011 through April 2016 for about $21 for the individual bottle and food warmer and about $120 for the starter kit or newborn set.

Consumers can contact Mayborn online at www.tommeetippee.us and click on the recall button at the bottom of home page or toll-free at 844-340-3420 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Saturday for more information.

This Mayborn recall follows another recent recall from the company. In May 2016, over 3 million Tommee Tippee Sippee Spill-Proof Cups were recalled due to the possibility of mold build-up in the removable, one-piece white valve.

Mayborn USA had received 3,066 reports of mold in the removable, one-piece, opaque valve of the Sippee cups, including 68 reports of children experiencing diarrhea, vomiting or other symptoms associated with drinking from a cup with mold in the valve.

Story sources: https://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2016/Tommee-Tippee-Electric-Bottle-and-Food-Warmers-Recalled-by-Mayborn-USA/

http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2016/Tommee-Tippee-Sippee-Cups-Recalled-by-Mayborn-USA/

Your Baby

Recall: Infant Bathtubs Due to Drowning and Impact Injury

1:30

This recall involves 86,000 Summer Infant Lil’ Luxuries Whirlpool, Bubbling Spa & Shower with fabric slings.

Fabric slings on the recalled infant bathtubs can detach from the tub, posing a risk of impact injury and drowning.

CPSC and Summer Infant have received reports of 91 incidents of the sling detaching, including 11 reports of infants who received a bump to the head.

The infant bathtub is a battery-operated whirlpool bath with motorized jets intended for use with children from birth to 2 years. The product contains a fabric sling on a plastic frame onto which the infant is placed for bathing. The fabric sling on the recalled bathtubs does not have a white plastic attachment clip to hold the headrest area of the fabric sling to the plastic frame.

Recalled bathtubs have item numbers 18840, 18850, 18863, and 18873 and were sold between October 2012 and October 2013 with date codes starting with 1210, 1211, 1212, 1301, 1302, 1303, 1304, 1305, 1306, 1307, and 1308, which stand for the two-digit year followed by the two-digit month, on the fabric sling.

Consumers should immediately stop using the fabric sling in the recalled product and contact Summer Infant for a replacement fabric sling with a white plastic attachment clip. Consumers can contact Summer Infant toll free at 844-612-4254 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Thursday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET on Friday, or online at www.summerinfant.com and click on “Safety Alerts & Recalls” at the bottom of the page for more information.

The recalled items were sold at Toys R Us/Babies R Us and other juvenile product specialty stores nationwide from October 2012 through October 2013 for about $60. CPSC and Summer Infant warn consumers that these tubs could have been and could continue to be sold on the secondhand market.

 

Your Baby

Exercising During Pregnancy

2:00

If you’re pregnant, you may be wondering if you should start or continue exercising. The answer is a resounding, yes!

Regular exercise throughout your pregnancy can help you stay healthy, improve your posture and help decrease common discomforts such as backaches and fatigue.

There is even evidence that physical activity may help prevent gestational diabetes, relieve stress and build more stamina needed for labor and delivery.

All of these benefits are good things.

If you were physically active before your pregnancy, there’s no need to stop. However, don’t try to exercise at your former level; instead, do what's most comfortable for you now. Low impact aerobics are encouraged versus high impact.

Check with your obstetrician for guidance if you are a competitive athlete, you may need specialized monitoring.

What if you have never been into exercise, should you start now that you are pregnant?  Absolutely!

You can safely begin an exercise program during pregnancy after consulting with your health care provider, but do not try a new, strenuous activity. Walking is considered safe to initiate when pregnant.

The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology recommends 30 minutes or more of moderate exercise per day on most if not all days of the week, unless you have a medical or pregnancy complication.

While exercise is great for most moms-to-be, there are some women who should not exercise during pregnancy. They are women with medical problems such as asthma, heart disease or diabetes. If you have one of these conditions, check with your OB/GYN about your options and follow his or her recommendations.

Exercise may also be harmful if you have a pregnancy-related condition such as:

           ·      Bleeding or spotting

           ·      Low placenta

           ·      Threatened or recurrent miscarriage

           ·      Previous premature births or history of early labor

           ·      Weak cervix

Talk with your health care provider before beginning an exercise program. Your health care provider can also give you personal exercise guidelines, based on your medical history.

Most exercises are safe to perform during pregnancy as long as you don’t overdo it.

The safest and most productive activities are swimming, brisk walking, indoor stationary cycling, step or elliptical machines, and low-impact aerobics (taught by a certified aerobics instructor). These activities carry little risk of injury, benefit your entire body, and can be continued until birth.

What about jogging, tennis and racquetball? All these activities require balance and coordination– which may change as you progress during your pregnancy.  If you’re healthy and have discussed these sports with your OB/GYN, go ahead and enjoy, but in moderation.

There are certain exercises that can be harmful during pregnancy. What exercises should be avoided? They are:

·      Holding your breath during any activity.

·      Activities where falling is likely (such as skiing and horseback riding).

·      Contact sports such as softball, football, basketball, and volleyball.

·      Any exercise that may cause even mild abdominal trauma such as activities that include jarring motions or rapid changes in direction.

·      Activities that require extensive jumping, hopping, skipping, bouncing, or running.

·      Deep knee bends, full sit-ups, double leg raises, and straight-leg toe touches.

·      Bouncing while stretching.

·      Waist-twisting movements while standing.

·      Heavy exercise spurts followed by long periods of no activity.

              ·      Exercise in hot, humid weather.

Stretching exercises can help make the muscles limber and warm, which can be helpful during pregnancy.

Kegal exercises can help strengthen the muscles that support the bladder, uterus and bowels. By strengthening these muscles during your pregnancy, you can develop the ability to relax and control the muscles in preparation for labor and birth.

Tailor exercises strengthen the pelvic, hip, and thigh muscles and can help relieve low back pain.

Many health providers have DVDs, websites or exercise pamphlets with instructions and examples available for their pregnant patients. There are also classes with instructors trained in leading exercise programs specifically for pregnant women.

What should a pregnancy program consist of?

A total fitness program should strengthen and condition your muscles. Don’t forget to drink plenty of water and never exercise to the point of exhaustion.

Exercising during pregnancy has many advantages, but there are warning signals you should look out for. Stop exercising immediately and contact your health provider is you:

             ·      Feel chest pain.

             ·      Have abdominal pain, pelvic pain, or persistent contractions.

             ·      Have a headache.

             ·      Notice an absence or decrease in fetal movement.

             ·      Feel faint, dizzy, nauseous, or light-headed.

             ·      Feel cold or clammy.

            ·      Have vaginal bleeding.

            ·      Have a sudden gush of fluid from the vagina, or a trickle of fluid that leaks steadily.

            ·      Notice an irregular or rapid heartbeat.

           ·      Have sudden swelling in your ankles, hands, face, or calf pain.

           ·      Are short of breath.

           ·      Have difficulty walking.

           ·      Have muscle weakness.

The big question many women have after delivery is – when can I start working off these extra pounds? It’s best to start fitness routines gradually and follow your health provider’s recommendations. Too often, women who have just given birth are inundated with images of celebrities who look as though they have dropped 50 pounds and returned to their former sleek selves within weeks after delivery. However they accomplish this (think spandex & a personal trainer that works you relentlessly), it’s not necessary or even healthy to try to capture your former body immediately.

Most women can safely perform a low-impact activity one to two weeks after a vaginal birth (or three to four weeks after a cesarean birth). Do about half of your normal floor exercises and don't try to overdo it.

Exercising during pregnancy is not a “one routine fits all” kind of thing. You can strengthen your muscles and reap the benefits of exercise while pregnant, just do it under the guidance of your health provider. He or she knows your limits, your medical history and will be able to help you achieve the best results.

Story source:

Traci C. Johnson, MD, http://www.webmd.com/baby/guide/exercise-during-pregnancy.

 

 

Pages

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

New report says not enough babies are getting much needed tummy time!

DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

New report says not enough babies are getting much needed tummy time!

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.

 

Please fill in your e-mail address to be included in our newsletter.
You may opt out at any time.