Your Baby

Fussy Baby: Walking or Rocking Most Calming?

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When your baby cries should you pick him or her up and walk or find a good rocking chair and rock back and forth? A new study from Japan says that infants respond best when mom (or any caregiver) picks them up and walks around.

Researchers said that the babies’ rapidly beating hearts also slowed down, proving that they felt calmer.

"Infants become calm and relaxed when they are carried by their mother” said study researcher Dr. Kumi Kuroda, who investigates social behavior at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Saitama, Japan. Interestingly, the study also observed the same response in baby mice.

For the study, researchers monitored the responses of 12 healthy infants ages 1 month to 6 months. The scientists wanted to discover the most effective way for mothers to calm a crying baby over a 30-second period — simply holding the baby or carrying the infant while walking.

Results showed that infants carried by walking mothers were the most relaxed and soothed compared to babies whose mothers sat in a chair and held them. As a mother stood up with her cradled her baby and started to walk, scientists observed an automatic change in the baby’s behavior.  

These results held even after the researchers took into account other factors, such as the child's age and sex, and the mother's age and walking speed.

Kuroda said she was surprised by the strength of the calming effect. Researchers noted that the rhythm of walking might be more effective in soothing infants than any other rhythmic motion, including rocking.

Babies cry for a variety of reasons. If an infant is hungry or in pain, they’ll most likely start crying again when they are laid back down. But sometimes a baby just feels a little anxious or unsure about their environment and will relax when held close and comforted. Kuroda acknowledged carrying might not completely stop the crying, but it may prevent parents from becoming frustrated by a crying infant.

The findings may also have implications for the parenting technique of letting babies cry in order to help them learn how to “soothe themselves”.

"Our study suggests why some babies do not respond well to the 'cry-it-out' parenting method," Kuroda said.

Babies crying during separation and maternal carrying are both built-in mechanisms for infant survival. These behaviors have been hard-wired for millions of years. "Changing these reactions would be possible as infants are flexible, but it may take time," she said.

While the study looked at a baby’s response to its mother, Kudro said the calming effect was not specific to moms. Dads, grandparents and caregivers were able to provide the same calming effect by carrying the baby and walking

Many moms and dads instinctively know to pick up a baby that’s crying, hold them close, pace around while gently patting baby on the back. This study just points out that if your baby is really upset, walking about may have a faster calming effect than rocking or sitting in a chair.  Plus it adds more evidence that simply ignoring a baby while he or she cries isn’t going to teach them how to soothe themselves. We all need a hug and a gentle pat on the back when we’re upset. Babies need it maybe even a little more.

The study was published online in the journal Current Biology.

Source: Carl Nierenberg, http://www.today.com/moms/carry-study-finds-its-good-

Your Baby

Recall: Babies R Us HALO SleepSacks

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You’d think by now that manufacturers of baby clothing could get it right.  But for some reason (most likely cost reduction) companies that make infants and young children’s clothing continue to add buttons, plastic or silk flowers, strings and other assortments of decorations that can either fall off and be ingested or strangle a child.

I’ve noticed that the majority of these items are made in China and make their way to the U.S. to be sold at large department store chains.

I’m guessing the penalty of a recall is more cost effective than making the product correctly in the first place because there are hundreds of these recalls every year.

In fact, I could post nothing but infant and children recall products and fill a year’s worth of articles without ever touching on any other topics.

Whether a parent or caregiver has bought a particular recall product or not I think it’s important to remind them that all infants and young children’s clothing should be mindfully examined before purchasing. Look at the construction and danger possibility of what the added adornments can cause if they come loose. Buy your baby products based on structural integrity and not just because they are cute. I’d also give it a more thorough examination if it were made in China.

This recall involves Babies R Us HALO SleepSacks. The recalled products are wearable blankets that are 100% white cotton and come with pink-edged ruffles and a pink satin rose embellishment on the front. These sack-shaped wearable blankets have cutouts for the baby’s arms, a zipper down the center, a sewn bottom and were sold in small and medium sizes. Only SleepSack products with GPU numbers 2701, 2781, 2886, 2887, 3007, 3035 and 3142 printed on a neck label under the primary neck label are included in the recall.  

Incidents/Injuries: The firm has received six reports of the petals detaching from the blankets including one report of an infant found gagging on a detached petal.

Remedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the wearable blankets and contact HALO Innovations for a pre-paid envelope containing instructions to remove and return the flower and order a free replacement product.   

Consumers should immediately stop using the wearable blankets and contact HALO Innovations for a pre-paid envelope containing instructions to remove and return the flower and order a free replacement product.   

Sold exclusively at: Babies R Us and www.babiesrus.com from December 2011 through July 2013 for about $25.  They are manufactured in China. 

Whether you own this product or not, it doesn’t hurt to take a close look at your baby’s clothing and stuffed toys to make sure that everything is sewn on tightly.

Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2013/HALO-SleepSacks-Wearable-Blankets-Recalled

 

 

 

Your Baby

Should Women Eat Fish While Pregnant?

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Fish are high in several beneficial nutrients, including some that are related to healthy brain development. But several organizations, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), recommend that women who are pregnant limit the amount of fish they eat.

The reason is that most fish and shellfish contain low-levels of methylmercury.

Almost all people have at least trace amounts of methylmercury in their tissues, reflecting the organic compound’s widespread presence in the environment. Fetuses, infants and children are the most vulnerable to the possible adverse effects of mercury exposure.

One of the major concerns of the medical community and mothers-to-be is the possibility of a link between eating fish that contains mercury, and their child developing autism.  

A new study addresses that concern and says that children exposed to low levels of mercury in the womb because their mothers ate large amounts of fish, don’t appear to be at an increased risk for autism.

The new findings from more than 30 years of research in the Republic of Seychelles -- a group of islands in the western Indian Ocean -- found no such link, the study authors said.

"This study shows no evidence of a correlation between low level mercury exposure and autism spectrum-like behaviors among children whose mothers ate, on average, up to 12 meals of fish each week during pregnancy," study lead author Edwin van Wijngaarden, associate professor in the public health sciences department at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York, said in a medical center news release.

"These findings contribute to the growing body of literature that suggest that exposure to the chemical does not play an important role in the onset of these behaviors," he added.

One autism expert added a note of caution, however.

"The study found no link between high mercury levels and later autism spectrum disorder behaviors. However, this should not be taken to mean that high levels of mercury are safe to ingest," said Alycia Hallday, senior director of environmental and clinical science at the advocacy group Autism Speaks.

"Other studies comparing this [Seychelles] cohort to those in other parts of the world indicate that this cohort may be spared from many adverse effects because it is consumed with nutrient-rich ocean fish," she explained.

For the study, the researchers initially determined the level of prenatal mercury exposure by analyzing the mothers' hair samples. Then the researchers used two questionnaires -- one given to parents, the other to the children's teachers -- to see if the children showed signs of autism spectrum-like behaviors. The tests included questions on language skills, communication skills and repetitive behaviors. While the tests don't give a definitive diagnosis, they are used widely in the United States as an initial screening tool and may indicate the need for additional testing, the researchers said.

The study also noted the concerns of and limitations recommended by the FDA and other organizations.

"This study shows no consistent association in children with mothers with mercury levels that were six to 10 times higher than those found in the U.S. and Europe. This is a sentinel population and if (the association between low-level mercury exposure and autism) does not exist here than it probably does not exist," Philip Davidson, principal investigator of the Seychelles Child Development Study and professor emeritus in pediatrics at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in the news release.

The finding lends support to an emerging belief that the good may outweigh the possible bad when it comes to eating fish during pregnancy. Specifically, if the mercury did not harm brain development at the levels of exposure experienced by the children in this study, then the benefits of the nutrients in fish may counteract or surpass the potential negative effects of mercury, the study authors said.

So, which fish have “low” or “high” mercury content? The American Pregnancy Association provides this list on their website.

Highest Mercury

AVOID

  • Marlin
  • Orange roughy
  • Tilefish
  • Swordfish
  • Shark
  • Mackerel (king)
  • Tuna (bigeye, Ahi)

High Mercury

Eat no more than three 6-oz servings per month

  • Sea Bass (Chilean)
  • Bluefish
  • Grouper
  • Mackerel (Spanish, Gulf)
  • Tuna (canned, white albacore) See tuna chart below
  • Tuna (Yellow fin)

Lower Mercury

Eat no more than six 6-oz servings per month

  • Bass (Striped, Black)
  • Carp
  • Cod (Alaskan)
  • Croaker (White Pacific)
  • Halibut ( Pacific and Atlantic) Jacksmelt ( Silverside)
  • Lobster
  • Mahi Mahi
  • Monkfish
  • Perch (freshwater)
  • Sablefish
  • Skate
  • Snapper
  • Sea Trout (Weakfish)
  • Tuna (canned, chunk light)
  • Tuna (Skipjack)

Lowest Mercury

Enjoy two 6-oz servings per week

  • Anchovies
  • Butterfish
  • Catfish
  • Clam
  • Crab (Domestic)
  • Crawfish/crayfish
  • Croaker
  • Flounder
  • Haddock
  • Hake
  • Herring
  • Mackerel (N Atlantic, Chub)
  • Mullet
  • Oysters
  • Perch (ocean)
  • Plaice
  • Salmon (Canned, Fresh)
  • Sardines
  • Scallops
  • Shad (American)
  • Shrimp
  • Sole
  • Squid (Calamari)
  • Tilapia
  • Trout (freshwater)
  • Whitefish
  • Whiting

The study was published online July 23 in the journal Epidemiology

Sources: http://consumer.healthday.com/pregnancy-information-29/pregnancy-news-543/breaking-brief-7-23-mercury-autism-epidemiology-urmc-release-678533.html

http://americanpregnancy.org/pregnancyhealth/fishmercury.htm

http://www.epa.gov/hg/effects.htm

Your Baby

Recall: 600,000 Angelcare Baby Monitors After Two Deaths

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The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), in cooperation with Angelcare Monitors Inc.®, of Quebec, Canada, is announcing a voluntary recall to provide cord covers for 600,000 Angelcare Movement and Sound Monitors with Sensor Pads. The cord attached to the baby monitor’s sensor pad is placed under the crib mattress, which poses a strangulation risk if the child pulls the cord into the crib and it becomes wrapped around the neck. 

Angelcare and CPSC have received reports of two infant cord strangulation deaths. In November 2011, a 13-month-old female died in San Diego, California, and, in August 2004, an 8-month-old female died in Salem, Oregon.  In both fatalities, the infant pulled the cord from the sensor pads, into the crib. In addition, there have been two reports of infants who became entangled in cords of Angelcare baby monitor models, which did not result in fatalities. In these incidents, it could not be determined if the “sensor pad cord” or the “monitor cord” was involved in the incident. 

The recall involves the Movement and Sound Monitor manufactured by Angelcare. This design of baby monitor includes a unique sensor pad placed inside the crib, under the mattress, to monitor movement of the baby.  An electrical cord about 11 feet long is permanently connected from the sensor pad to the nursery monitor unit. A cord within reach of a baby inside the crib creates the hazard. The cord can be pulled into the crib and can wrap around the child’s neck. The recall involves ALL versions of Angelcare sensor monitors including model numbers that did not include rigid cord covers offered in the remedy, such as:

  • AC1100
  • AC201
  • AC300
  • AC401
  • AC601
  • 49255

To find the model number, look on the back of the nursery monitor unit. The monitors were manufactured between 1999 and 2013. 

Angelcare is providing consumers with a repair kit that includes rigid protective cord covers through which the sensor pad cords can be threaded, a new, permanent electric cord-warning label about the strangulation risk, and revised instructions. 

The recalled baby monitors were sold at Babies R Us/Toys R Us, Burlington Coat Factory, Meijer, Sears, Walmart, Amazon.com, Target.com, Overstock.com, and nearly 70 small baby specialty stores, from October 1999 through September 2013 for about $100to $300. 

Consumers should immediately make sure cords are placed out of reach of the child and contact Angelcare toll-free at (855) 355-2643 between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or visit the firm's website at www.angelcarebaby.com to order the free repair kit.

Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2014/Angelcare-Recalls-to-Repair-Movement-and-Sound-Baby-Monitors-After-Two-Deaths/

 Angelcare Movement and Sound Baby Monitor

A hand holds the cord that can be pulled into the crib.

Your Baby

Walmart Recalls Baby Dolls Due to Burn Hazards

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Twelve children have suffered incidents, including two reports of burns or blisters from “The My Sweet Love” and “My Sweet Baby” dolls sold nationwide at Walmart stores and online.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) announced that Walmart is now recalling these dolls. Consumers should immediately take the dolls from children, remove the batteries and return the doll to any Walmart store for a full refund.

The circuit in the chest of the doll can overheat, causing the surface of the doll to get hot, posing a burn hazard to the consumer.

The My Sweet Love / My Sweet Baby electronic baby doll comes in pink floral clothing and matching knit hat. The 16-inch doll is packaged with a toy medical check-up kit including a stethoscope, feeding spoon, thermometer and syringe. The doll’s electronics cause her to babble when she gets “sick,” her cheeks turn red and she starts coughing. Using the medical kit pieces cause the symptoms to stop. “My Sweet Baby” is printed on the front of the clear plastic and cardboard packaging.

The doll is identified by UPC 6-04576-16800-5 and a date code that begins with WM. The date code is printed on the stuffed article label sewn into the bottom of the doll.

Walmart has received 12 reports of incidents, including two reports of burns or blisters to the thumb.

About 174,000 dolls are being recalled and were sold from August 2012 through March 2014 for $20.00.

Consumers can contact Walmart Stores at (800) 925-6278 from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. CT Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. CT on Saturday, and from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. CT on Sunday, or online at www.walmart.com and click on Product Recalls for more information.

Source: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2014/Wal-Mart-Recalls-Dolls/#remedy

Walmart Doll Recall

Your Baby

Infant Medicine Recall

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“Out of an abundance of caution”, Perrigo Co. has issued a voluntary recall of 18 batches of their over-the-counter liquid acetaminophen that is used to treat fever and aches and pains in infants.

The recall is not because of a problem with the medicine itself, but because a small number of boxes may contain a dispensing syringe without dose markings.

The medicine is sold under a variety of brand names including Babies R Us and Care One.  The list of labels and batch numbers of the recalled product are listed below.

Label and Batches

BABIES R US- 3KK0606

CARE ONE -3HK0564

EQUALINE - 3HK0672

EQUATE - 3HK0672, 3JK0433, 3JK0594, 3JK0595, 3JK0653, 3JK0673, 3KK0815,

3KK0817

HARMON FACE VALUES - 3JK0594

HEALTH MART - 3HK0671

HEALTHY ACCENTS - 3HK0671, 3KK0606

HEB - 3KK0606

KROGER - 3GK0645, 3GK0704, 3HK0671, 3JK0433, 3JK0595, 3JK0653, 3JK0433,

3JK0595, 3GK0645, 3GK0704, 3JK0595

LEADER DRUG - 3JK0433, 3JK0594

MEIJER - 3JK0594, 3JK0597

PUBLIX - 3JK0595

RITE AID - 3GK0704

TOPCARE - 3KK0359, 3KK0494

UP & UP - 3HK0672

WALGREEN - 3GK0704, 3HK0564, 3HK0671, 3JK0433, 3JK0595, 3JK0610, 3KK0360

Giving infants the correct dose of acetaminophen is very important when treating them for an illness or injury. Too much acetaminophen can overload the liver’s ability to process the drug safely and can lead to a life-threatening condition.

According to Perrigo’s press release about the recall, if you have purchased a package that contains an oral dosing device that does not have dose markings, the consumer should not use the product and should call Perrigo's Consumer Affairs Department, toll free, 1-800-719-9260. Consumers should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have any questions, or if they or their children experience any problem that could possibly be related to this drug product.

No injuries have been reported to Perrigo at this time.

Source: http://perrigo.investorroom.com/2013-11-01-Perrigo-Initiates-Nationwide-Voluntary-Product-Recall-Of-Acetaminophen-Infant-Suspension-Liquid-160-mg-5-mL-Due-To-A-Potential-Defect-With-The-Co-Packaged-Oral-Syringe

Michael Calia, http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-20131101-711768.html?dsk=y&mod=dist_smartbrief

Unmarked syringe

Your Baby

Preemies Health Problems Sometimes Inherited

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An interesting new study says that not all health problems linked to premature births may be the result of a too early delivery. Only some of the physical and mental health problems previously connected with preterm birth are actually caused by it, the study says, other health issues may simply be inherited.

Researchers analyzed the medical records of 3.3 million children born in Sweden between 1973 and 2008, and confirmed the strong link between preterm birth (generally classified as before 37 weeks' gestation) and the risk of infant and young adult death, autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

However, the study authors also concluded that many other problems that have been linked with preterm birth -- such as severe mental illness, learning problems, suicide and poverty -- may instead be more closely related to other factors that people share with other family members.

"The study confirms the degree to which preterm birth is a major public health concern and strongly supports the need for social services that reduce the incidence of preterm birth," study lead author Brian D'Onofrio, an associate professor in the department of psychological and brain sciences at Indiana University Bloomington, said in a university news release.

"Yet, the findings also suggest the need to extend services to all siblings in families with an offspring born preterm. In terms of policy, it means that the entire family, including all of the siblings, is at risk," he added.

Previous studies have compared preterm infants to non-related full-term infants. This study however, compared preterm infants with full-term siblings and cousins, an approach that shed new light on the issue.

"Our study is part of a growing interest in research and public health initiatives focusing on very early risk," he added. "When you look at early risk factors, they don't just predict one type of problem; they frequently predict lots of problems with long-term implications."

The study was published in the September issue of the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

 

Nearly half a million babies in the U.S. are born premature each year.

There are a number of risk factors associated with spontaneous preterm birth but more than half of preterm births happen in pregnancies where there are no identifiable risk factors. While there is no way to predict if you will have a preterm birth, there are some common risk factors that can increase the likelihood of a preterm birth. They include:

- You have had a previous preterm delivery

- You’re pregnant with twins or other multiples

- You are younger than 17 and older than 35

- You were underweight before your pregnancy and have not gained enough weight during pregnancy

- You are African American

- You’ve had vaginal bleeding in the first or second trimester. Vaginal bleeding in more than one trimester means the risk is even higher.

- You’ve had moderate to severe anemia early in your pregnancy

- You smoke, abuse alcohol or use drugs, especially cocaine, during pregnancy

- You’ve had little to no prenatal care

- You are pregnant with a single baby that is the result of fertility treatments.

Spontaneous births can also be caused by medical conditions such as infection, having a problem with the placenta, structural abnormalities of the uterus or cervix or having abdominal surgery while pregnant to name a few.

The best thing that a mother-to-be can do for herself and her unborn baby is to start prenatal care as soon as she discovers she is pregnant. There are no guarantees that you will have a full term delivery with no complications, but you can increase the odds to your favor by getting good prenatal care, sticking to a healthy diet, exercising and keeping your body free of drugs, alcohol and cigarette smoke.

Make it a point to learn about yours and your spouse’s medical family history. There may be clues that your OB/GYN should be aware of as he or she provides your prenatal care.

Sources: http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2013/09/25/preemies-woes-sometimes-due-to-heredity-study-says

http://www.babycenter.com/0_preterm-labor-and-birth_1055.bc

 

Your Baby

Health Risks Rise if Too Thin, Heavy During Pregnancy

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Weight control can be problematic for some people at any stage of their life, but woman especially can have a tough time during pregnancy. Pregnancy can make you feel hungry nearly all the time, or send you running to the bathroom at the mere sight of food.

A new study carried out in Scotland looks at low and high body mass index (BMI) during pregnancy and the role it plays in the mother and child’s health as well as health care costs. They found that pregnant women who had too low or too high a BMI were at a higher risk for complications and additional hospitalization.

109,592 pregnant women were examined and classified in five categories based on their BMI. The classifications were:

- Underweight BMI < 18.5

- Normal BMI 18.5-24.9

- Overweight BMI 25-29.9

- Obese BMI 30-35

- Severely obese > 35

Researchers were able to show an association between higher BMIs and pregnancy complications. Severely obese pregnant women were 3 times more likely than normal-weight pregnant women to have high blood pressure and gestational diabetes. Compared to normal-weight women, those in all other weight categories had more and longer hospitalizations after birth. The risk of hospitalization was 8 percent higher for underweight women, 16 percent higher for overweight women, 45 percent higher for obese women and 88 percent higher for severely obese women.

The study also found that women with high or low BMI had higher medical costs than normal-weight women.

Co-author of the study, Dr. Fiona Denison of Queens's Medical Research Institute in Edinburgh, said in a journal news release, "Longer-term benefits of reducing maternal obesity will show improvements, not only in the health outcomes of mothers and their babies, but the workload and cost to current maternity services."

What does a BMI tell you about your health? Some experts say that determining a person’s BMI is the most accurate way to define a person’s weight on their health. Other experts believe that body-fat percentage gives a more accurate account.

If you are considering starting a family, there are many websites that offer online BMI calculators so you can find out what your personal BMI currently is.

If you are pregnant, discuss your weight with your obstetrician or family doctor to see how much weight gain is healthy for you personally. A regular BMI calculation doesn’t apply to pregnant women. You are supposed to gain a certain amount of weight while pregnant. Every woman will be different depending on her pre-pregnancy weight and over-all health.

Other studies have found an association between obesity during pregnancy and a higher risk of fetal complications. Women with a body-mass index between 30 and 35 were 58 percent more likely than those at a healthy weight to deliver an extremely premature baby, a team of U.S. and Swedish researchers found after examining the medical and delivery records of 1,599, 551 Swedish moms. Pregnant women with a BMI between 35 and 40 were twice as likely as normal-weight moms to have an extremely premature baby, while those with BMIs of 40 or greater were nearly three times as likely to deliver an extremely premature baby. 

The most important take-away from this study is that women who want to become pregnant understand the importance of maintaining a healthy weight prior to conception and continue to maintain a healthy weight gain during pregnancy.

Sources: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130918090847.htm

Linda Carroll, http://www.nbcnews.com/health/losing-weight-baby-moms-obesity-linked-extreme-preemies-4B11203812

Your Baby

Weight Gain During Pregnancy

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Every pregnant woman wonders how much weight she could gain during pregnancy. For some women, being pregnant is an open invitation to eat whatever and whenever they like, while other woman worry what the weight gain will do to their figure. There is no absolute law about weight gain during pregnancy, but there are set of guidelines that can help you.

Weight gain should be based on your pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI.) Your health and your baby’s health also play a role in how much weight you should gain.

Here’s a list of suggested pregnancy weigh gain related to a healthy woman’s BMI.

  • Underweight (BMI less than 18.5) – 28 to 40 pounds
  • Normal weight (BMI 18.5 to 24.9) – 25 to 35 pounds
  • Overweight (BMI 25 to 29.9) – 15 to 25 pounds
  • Obese (BMI 30 or more) – 11 to 20 pounds

Multiples are a different story. If you are carrying twins or other multiples you’re likely going to need to gain more than average weight. Your health care provider can help you determine what is right for you. Here are the recommended weight gain options.

  • Normal weight (BMI 18.5 to 24.9) – 37 to 54 pounds
  • Overweight (BMI 25 to 29.9) – 31 to 50 pounds
  • Obese (BMI 30 or more) – 25 to 42 pounds

If you are overweight when you become pregnant, pregnancy increases the risk of various complications including diabetes and high blood pressure. Of course, a certain amount of weight gain is normal, but too much adds to the possibility of dangerous health risks for the woman and the child.

Remember that if you gain more than the recommended amount during pregnancy and you don't lose the weight after the baby is born, the excess pounds increase your lifelong health risks. Gaining too much weight during pregnancy can also increase your baby's risk of health problems at birth and childhood obesity.

If you're underweight, it's essential to gain a reasonable amount of weight while you're pregnant. Without the extra weight, your baby might be born earlier or smaller than expected.

Calculating your BMI is not difficult; you just need to know your height and weight. There are several online BMI calculators that will do the math for you. Your healthcare provider should also have a BMI chart that can show you your BMI.

So, how is the extra weight used by your body when your pregnant? Here’s a simple list to help you follow a normal weight gain.

  • Baby: 7 to 8 pounds
  • Larger breasts: 2 pounds
  • Larger uterus: 2 pounds
  • Placenta: 1 1/2 pounds
  • Amniotic fluid: 2 pounds
  • Increased blood volume: 3 to 4 pounds
  • Increased fluid volume: 3 to 4 pounds
  •  Fat stores: 6 to 8 pounds

During your first trimester, you probably won’t gain much weight. Steady weight gain is more important in the second and third trimesters, especially if you begin at a normal weight or are underweight.

Exercise is also important during pregnancy. Even a moderate amount of exercise will help keep your body strong as the extra pressure builds while you are carrying.

As your pregnancy develops, more than likely you’re appetite will increase. That’s not a bad thing. Just fill those hunger pains with healthy food choices!

Source: http://www.mayoclinic.org/pregnancy-weight-gain/art-20044360

 

 

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