Your Baby

Fussy Baby: Walking or Rocking Most Calming?

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When your baby cries should you pick him or her up and walk or find a good rocking chair and rock back and forth? A new study from Japan says that infants respond best when mom (or any caregiver) picks them up and walks around.

Researchers said that the babies’ rapidly beating hearts also slowed down, proving that they felt calmer.

"Infants become calm and relaxed when they are carried by their mother” said study researcher Dr. Kumi Kuroda, who investigates social behavior at the RIKEN Brain Science Institute in Saitama, Japan. Interestingly, the study also observed the same response in baby mice.

For the study, researchers monitored the responses of 12 healthy infants ages 1 month to 6 months. The scientists wanted to discover the most effective way for mothers to calm a crying baby over a 30-second period — simply holding the baby or carrying the infant while walking.

Results showed that infants carried by walking mothers were the most relaxed and soothed compared to babies whose mothers sat in a chair and held them. As a mother stood up with her cradled her baby and started to walk, scientists observed an automatic change in the baby’s behavior.  

These results held even after the researchers took into account other factors, such as the child's age and sex, and the mother's age and walking speed.

Kuroda said she was surprised by the strength of the calming effect. Researchers noted that the rhythm of walking might be more effective in soothing infants than any other rhythmic motion, including rocking.

Babies cry for a variety of reasons. If an infant is hungry or in pain, they’ll most likely start crying again when they are laid back down. But sometimes a baby just feels a little anxious or unsure about their environment and will relax when held close and comforted. Kuroda acknowledged carrying might not completely stop the crying, but it may prevent parents from becoming frustrated by a crying infant.

The findings may also have implications for the parenting technique of letting babies cry in order to help them learn how to “soothe themselves”.

"Our study suggests why some babies do not respond well to the 'cry-it-out' parenting method," Kuroda said.

Babies crying during separation and maternal carrying are both built-in mechanisms for infant survival. These behaviors have been hard-wired for millions of years. "Changing these reactions would be possible as infants are flexible, but it may take time," she said.

While the study looked at a baby’s response to its mother, Kudro said the calming effect was not specific to moms. Dads, grandparents and caregivers were able to provide the same calming effect by carrying the baby and walking

Many moms and dads instinctively know to pick up a baby that’s crying, hold them close, pace around while gently patting baby on the back. This study just points out that if your baby is really upset, walking about may have a faster calming effect than rocking or sitting in a chair.  Plus it adds more evidence that simply ignoring a baby while he or she cries isn’t going to teach them how to soothe themselves. We all need a hug and a gentle pat on the back when we’re upset. Babies need it maybe even a little more.

The study was published online in the journal Current Biology.

Source: Carl Nierenberg, http://www.today.com/moms/carry-study-finds-its-good-

Your Baby

Evenflo Recalls 1.3 Million Child Seat Buckles

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Evenflo Company Inc. is voluntarily recalling 1.3 million convertible car seats and harnessed booster seats due to the risk that during an emergency a child may not be able to be removed quickly.

The buckles on the car seats and booster seats may become stuck in the locked position. The National Highway Transportation and Safety Administration (NHTSA) said the buckles used in the recall models were manufactured between 2011 and 2014.

Evenflo’s website states that “These select models use a harness crotch buckle which may become resistant to unlatching over time, due to exposure to various contaminants (like food and drinks) that are present in everyday use of the convertible car seat or harnessed booster by toddlers. This condition may make it difficult to remove a child from the vehicle. There is no such risk if the buckle is functioning normally. These convertible car seats and harnessed boosters meet all requirements for crashworthiness under the federal FMVSS 213 safety standard and can continue to be used to transport your child safely, if you are not experiencing difficulty unlatching the buckle. Importantly, Evenflo has received no reports of injuries to children in connection with the use of this buckle on the seats that are subject to this recall.”

The recall models include:  

  • Momentum – Model number prefix- 385
  • Chase - Model number prefix- 306, 329
  • Maestro – Model number prefix- 310
  • Symphony - Model number prefix-345, 346
  • Snugli All in One - Model number prefix- 345, 346
  • Titan - Model number prefix- 371
  • SureRide - Model number prefix- 371
  • Secure Kid & Snugli Booster - Model number prefix- 308

Evenflo is providing consumers a remedy kit, free-of-charge that includes a replacement buckle and instructions for installing the new buckle. The remedy kit is available by placing an order with Evenflo on their website at www.buckle.evenflo.com, or calling 1-800-490-7591.

Evenflo requests that consumers not return the convertible car seats or harnessed boosters to retailers.

The website also contains a link for instructions on cleaning the buckles.

The NHTSA is also investigating the safety of Evenflo’s rear-facing infant seats.

Source: http://www.mbtmag.com/news/2014/04/evenflo-recalling-13m-child-seat-buckles

http://safety.evenflo.com/cs/sc/cssc99_RD.phtml?rid=EFR36&src=WEB

Your Baby

Infant Medicine Recall

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“Out of an abundance of caution”, Perrigo Co. has issued a voluntary recall of 18 batches of their over-the-counter liquid acetaminophen that is used to treat fever and aches and pains in infants.

The recall is not because of a problem with the medicine itself, but because a small number of boxes may contain a dispensing syringe without dose markings.

The medicine is sold under a variety of brand names including Babies R Us and Care One.  The list of labels and batch numbers of the recalled product are listed below.

Label and Batches

BABIES R US- 3KK0606

CARE ONE -3HK0564

EQUALINE - 3HK0672

EQUATE - 3HK0672, 3JK0433, 3JK0594, 3JK0595, 3JK0653, 3JK0673, 3KK0815,

3KK0817

HARMON FACE VALUES - 3JK0594

HEALTH MART - 3HK0671

HEALTHY ACCENTS - 3HK0671, 3KK0606

HEB - 3KK0606

KROGER - 3GK0645, 3GK0704, 3HK0671, 3JK0433, 3JK0595, 3JK0653, 3JK0433,

3JK0595, 3GK0645, 3GK0704, 3JK0595

LEADER DRUG - 3JK0433, 3JK0594

MEIJER - 3JK0594, 3JK0597

PUBLIX - 3JK0595

RITE AID - 3GK0704

TOPCARE - 3KK0359, 3KK0494

UP & UP - 3HK0672

WALGREEN - 3GK0704, 3HK0564, 3HK0671, 3JK0433, 3JK0595, 3JK0610, 3KK0360

Giving infants the correct dose of acetaminophen is very important when treating them for an illness or injury. Too much acetaminophen can overload the liver’s ability to process the drug safely and can lead to a life-threatening condition.

According to Perrigo’s press release about the recall, if you have purchased a package that contains an oral dosing device that does not have dose markings, the consumer should not use the product and should call Perrigo's Consumer Affairs Department, toll free, 1-800-719-9260. Consumers should contact their physician or healthcare provider if they have any questions, or if they or their children experience any problem that could possibly be related to this drug product.

No injuries have been reported to Perrigo at this time.

Source: http://perrigo.investorroom.com/2013-11-01-Perrigo-Initiates-Nationwide-Voluntary-Product-Recall-Of-Acetaminophen-Infant-Suspension-Liquid-160-mg-5-mL-Due-To-A-Potential-Defect-With-The-Co-Packaged-Oral-Syringe

Michael Calia, http://online.wsj.com/article/BT-CO-20131101-711768.html?dsk=y&mod=dist_smartbrief

Unmarked syringe

Your Baby

Preparing for a New Sibling

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Bringing a new baby home is one of the most exciting times for parents and grandparents.  9 months of planning and anticipation finally pays off when the new addition arrives safe and sound.  However, there may be one person who isn’t quite sure what all the fuss is about and what having a new child in the family is going to mean for them. The sibling.

A new brother or sister may be thrilling to most of the family members, but a new baby who is getting all the attention can seem overwhelming to the first child, especially for very young siblings. Their very sense of security can feel threatened, leaving them feeling angry and acting out. So, before the little bundle of joy arrives, it’s a good idea to prepare the older child for big changes ahead.

You can do that as early as when mom starts showing. Introduce the idea that mommy is pregnant. Being pregnant means that mom & dad are going to have another child, and that means a little brother or sister is going to be part of the family.

One good tip is to have a calendar on hand and circle the date when the baby is due. Have the older child start marking the days as they go by.

If you have a very young child you can say “ the baby will arrive in the summer, when the weather gets hot.” Or “in the fall, when all the leaves start to fall.” Give them something they can identify with if they are too young to understand dates.

Once that’s established, ask them if they have any questions about having a little brother or sister. Children may be so surprised that they don’t have anything to ask right away. But as time goes on, they will have plenty of questions. Give answers that are age appropriate in a language that is easy to understand. Keep your answers simple but inclusive of how a new baby may affect their life. An example might be “the baby will cry and may wake you up at night for a while. That’s normal behavior for a new baby. We’ll all be tired for a little while, but it will get better. ” 

You can also bring out pictures or videos of when they were babies. Children love to hear stories about when they were little. Explain how much you loved them then and now. This little exercise in closeness can also help them understand the importance of babies and what a baby can bring to the family.

As the due date gets closer, try and keep everything as routine as possible. Avoid big transitions such as potty training, changing to a big girl or boy bed, getting rid of the pacifier or binky or anything that may separate the older sibling from the family. If the sibling must undergo some of these changes, start as early as possible so that they don’t make a negative association between these changes and the baby.

One unavoidable change that might occur is that mom will be away for a few days when the baby is born. Prepare your child for your absence during the birth of the new baby (how long you will be gone, where your child will stay). If your child is going to stay with someone else for a few days, do a couple of practice stay-overs so they will see that you will come back and bring them home.

For toddlers, you might also consider role-playing with dolls. Let them use the doll to ask questions or talk about their fears or excitement about the baby.

Once the baby is born allow the sibling to come to the hospital and see the baby and that mom is ok. A cute tip is to have a gift from the new baby for the sibling.

Once baby is home, suppress any negative comparisons such as “ you cried a lot more’, or ‘he or she is a lot calmer than you were.”

Other things to keep in mind are:

- Don’t be alarmed if siblings don’t express an interest in the new baby. Sibling relationships have a lifetime to develop.

- Accept that some regression may occur; this is normal. Baby your big-boy/girl for a while, if that’s what he/she seems to need.

- Remind visitors to pay attention to your older kids and monitor gift-giving. It can be upsetting for sibling to see all of the presents that the newborn receives, especially when people don’t bring something for them.

- Try not to blame the baby for your new limitations (“Mommy can’t play with you now because I have to feed the baby,” or “Mommy needs to change the baby, so you need to read to yourself.”). Blaming new babies for decreased time spent with you can breed sibling resentment. Instead, involve siblings in child-care as helpers.

- Create opportunities for older siblings to be participants and not competitors (e.g., getting a diaper ready, reading the baby a story, pushing the carriage).

- Remind siblings of the things they can do because they are older (e.g., eating food, playing with toys, going to the playground).

- Remember to give siblings private time with you and reinforce the idea that many of the things they are able to help out with (e.g., errand running, meal preparation, etc.), are because of their advanced abilities.

While you are busy with a new baby, developmental changes are still going on with your older child. Kids that are two or under may have difficulty with a new addition because they still have strong needs as well. Stress in the family can make the sibling’s adjustment more difficult. So remember to stay calm when you’re with the children.

One more thing to be aware of is how rough a sibling may be with a new baby. They really don’t understand how delicate the baby is and have to learn what kind of playing or interaction is too rough. They may also hug a little to hard. You’ll have to guide them in the correct gentle behaviors. Focus on your older child’s positive behaviors towards the new baby such as “ I like how you gently kiss your little brother or sister.”

Having a new baby in the family is difficult, but don’t despair. The first few months will be an adjustment for everyone. But before you know it, the new baby will feel like he or she has always been a part of the family.

Source: Bronwyn Charlton, PhD, http://www.everydayhealth.com/kids-health/prepping-your-child-for-a-new-sibling.aspx

Your Baby

More Moms Breastfeeding 6 Months and Longer

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More moms are breastfeeding for at least six months and many are breastfeeding up to a year according to a new report issued by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC.)

Almost half of U.S. moms in 2010 breastfed their babies for six months, up from 35 percent in 2000, a U.S. health official said.

Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, said the percent of babies breastfeeding at 12 months also increased from 16 percent to 27 percent during that same time period. The data also showed babies who started breastfeeding increased from 71 percent in 2000 to 77 percent in 2010.

"This is great news for the health of our nation because babies who are breastfed have lower risks of ear and gastrointestinal infections, diabetes and obesity, while mothers who breastfeed have lower risks of breast and ovarian cancers," Frieden said in a statement.

"Also, breastfeeding lowers healthcare costs. Researchers have calculated that $2.2 billion in yearly medical costs could be saved if breastfeeding recommendations were met. It is critical that we continue working to improve hospital, community and workplace support for breastfeeding mothers and babies and realize these cost savings."

More hospitals are also making it possible for newborns and their mothers to spend more time together. Newborns that stay in the room with their mother at least 23 hours per day increased from about 30 percent in 2007 to 37 percent in 2011.

Breastfeeding rates have been on the rise, increasing from about 71 percent to 77 percent during the last decade. Breast milk is easier for babies to digest and helps protect against disease.  Breast-fed babies have lower rates of respiratory infections, asthma, obesity, Type 2 diabetes, Type 1 diabetes, childhood leukemia and a type of skin rash known as atopic dermatitis. Decreased risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) has also been observed. Recent studies have also shown that babies who are breast-fed may possibly receive a boost in intelligence.

How long moms tend to breastfeed differs across the nation. 

Idaho was the state with the most breast-feeding moms, with about 91.8 percent of new mothers breast-feeding at some point. California, Oregon, Colorado and New Hampshire rounded out the top five.

At the six-month marker, the top states for breast-feeding mothers were Idaho, California, Oregon, Hawaii and Utah. By one year, Utah, Idaho, California, Hawaii and Vermont moms held the top spots.

The states with the lowest rate of breast-feeding was Mississippi, where only 50.5 percent of new mothers breast-fed at any point and time, just 19.7 percent were breast-feeding at six months, and barely 9.1 percent of moms made it to 1 year.

Sources: http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2013/07/31/About-half-of-US-mothers-breastfeed-for-six-months/UPI-65461375322645/#ixzz2apFXWlia

Michelle Castillo, http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57596538/cdc-breast-feeding-rates-rise-to-77-percent-of-u.s-moms/

Your Baby

Social Networks Influence Kid’s Vaccinations

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A new study looks at what influences parents to either have or not have their infants vaccinated. Researchers reported that parents make decisions about whether to vaccinate fully, vaccinate over a period of time or not vaccinate their children at all largely based on social networks.

Emily K. Brunson, PhD, MPH, from Texas State University in San Marcos, presented the results of her survey in an article in the online journal Pediatrics. Dr. Brunson surveyed United States–born, first-time parents who had children aged 18 months or younger and resided in King County, Washington. A total of 126 participants conformed to vaccination recommendations and 70 did not. The 70 other parents forged their own paths: 28 delayed vaccines, 37 partially vaccinated and five didn’t vaccinate at all.

The two groups were described as “conformers” and “non-conformers”. 95% of both groups said they get their advice from people that they go to for information. The non-conformers were also significantly more inclined to use “source networks” (sources people go to for information and advice such as books, pamphlets, research articles and the Internet).

The current study connects immunization decision-making with the pressure to conform to group opinion. It also looks at whether parents are more likely to choose a social group that reflects their own beliefs and actions, or let the social group dictate their beliefs and actions. Dr. Brunson's data suggest that the social groups dictate the decisions.

Parents who did not conform to the recommended Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) schedule had a higher percentage of people in their social networks that recommended not conforming to the vaccine schedule.

Conformers were more likely to get their information from family, friends and healthcare providers.

“Parents’ people networks matter a ton,” says Brunson, now an assistant professor of anthropology at Texas State University. “Having those conversations with your sister, with your parent, with your friends matter a lot more than we thought.”

On an average, 59% of non-conformers reported that their sources – many of which persist in promoting a widely debunked association between vaccines and autism- recommend ignoring the CDC’s guidelines for vaccinations as compared to only 20% of conformer’s sources.

The actual number of “zero dosers” has stayed at less than 2%, but the numbers of parents who don’t trust that vaccines will actually do what they are told they will do is growing. This frustrates many pediatricians who have seen first hand or know about the deadly consequences of vaccine-preventable diseases. Some parents are deciding for themselves which vaccines they feel are necessary and then developing their own vaccine schedule by spacing out shots over a series of years, which experts argue only extends the time their kids are susceptible to disease or capable of passing it on to others.

Vaccines have been widely studied and current research has shown that multiple vaccinations do not pose a hazard to young children. Some of the older vaccines exposed toddlers to more antigens than newly formulated vaccines do.

Scientists noted that public-health officials should consider the importance of social networks when getting out the message that childhood immunizations are important for children’s health. It may be time, they say, to extend their reach beyond doctors and start paying attention to other people who influence parents’ vaccination decisions, namely friends and family whom moms and dads list as part of their “social network.” “If we want to improve vaccination rates, communication needs to be directed to the public at large,” says Brunson.

Preliminary data on Immunity Community’s effectiveness look promising: last year, one Montessori-preschool pilot site raised its immunization rate from 60% to 80%. The CDC is keeping tabs on the results and could bring it to other states as a potential national model, albeit one rooted at the local level. “For people to be passionate and credible and persuasive about this, they have to be local community members,” says Kris Sheedy of the CDC’s immunization-services division. “We know that birds of a feather flock together, so it’s a good thing to make vaccinating parents more visible.”

As the battle rages on about the safety and necessity of infant vaccines, too many children are not receiving the recommended doses. Doctors and public health officials are going to have to be more clear and aggressive in getting information to the general public on the facts surrounding immunizations.

Sources: Bonnie Rochman, http://healthland.time.com/2013/04/15/how-social-networks-influence-a-parents-decision-to-vaccinate/#ixzz2QZyv47qZ

Larry C. Pullen, PhD., http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/782558

Your Baby

From Breast to Bottle; An Adventure

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Ah yes, I remember breastfeeding my baby.

As a young and somewhat naïve mother, it was like stepping onto foreign soil. A place I’d never visited before.

For me, the most unexpected part of this ancient ritual was how painful it was at first.  I’d heard about the bonding it would bring, the day and night hours required and how if I ate certain foods before feeding, my baby could end up with a bad bout of gas.

However, no one mentioned that it was going to hurt like crazy until my nipples “toughened up,” (as my doctor was fond of saying) or how my breasts would become milk waterfalls cascading through my blouse while grocery shopping. Eventually, I got the hang of it and it began to feel like a natural extension of being a mom.

When it came time to transition to bottle-feeding, I actually felt a little sad about letting go of what had become a special time with my baby girl. Her fuzzy little head resting against my breast and her curious eyes watching my every expression as she ate.  We had a lot of one-sided conversations with me telling her about my day and her sucking, burping and falling asleep.

Alas though, one cannot breastfeed forever. So I began again with learning how to keep my baby well nourished while trying to figure out how much formula to give her and how to warm a bottle without scalding us both.

I breastfed for about 5 months – give or take a few weeks. Making the changeover left me feeling a little guilty. My little one seemed to really dislike the replacement bottle, so we did it in stages. I also added breast milk to the bottle at first so she would recognize the taste. It was not a smooth transition.

We ultimately came to an agreement that she would drink from the bottle if I would rock her and sing to her and make funny faces. Another caveat was we’d have to do it in short spurts of time – she would refuse-then accept, refuse-accept. I think it was so that she could feel like she had a little control over the whole unsettling situation. Agreed.

Shortly after we started working on the bottle arrangement, my pediatrician suggested that adding small amounts of solid foods to her diet might also be helpful in weaning her off the breasts.

My first response to this perfectly sane idea was... “What real foods? Biscuits and gravy? Scrambled eggs and toast? Shouldn’t I put these foods in a blender or something? I don’t think she can eat them straight-up.”

“Uh, no” she responded calmly. “Let’s start with a small amount of baby cereal.”

And so, a new tradition began. Here’s how it went.

Make a little baby cereal. Put it on a tiny little spoon and attempt to delicately get it in her tightly shut mouth.

Taste the baby cereal (to make sure it is not too hot, not too cold.)

Stir cereal and try again to get the itty-bitty spoon into her itty-bitty securely shut mouth.

Lead by example.

“Watch mommy. This is really good cereal. Mmmm – I think this is the best cereal I’ve ever eaten.” Actually it’s not bad.

Stick finger in cereal and rub on baby’s squeezed tight-as-a drum, never to be opened mouth.

Switch to a much larger spoon and start scooping.

“You’re missing out on some amazing cereal, sweetie. Yum, yum, yum.”

Repeat as necessary.

“Oh look… it’s all gone. Good job!”

It took awhile to finally make the switch from breast to bottle. It was quite an experience for both of us. Two important goals were eventually accomplished; my sweet baby survived and flourished and my breasts’ finally quit hurting.

If you’re breastfeeding, someday you’ll introduce a bottle, sippy-cup or spoon to your child. Expect a battle, it’s ok. Keep a grip on patience and humor. You’ll need them both.

Warm compresses can ease the discomfort of sore breasts and gradually nursing or pumping less will signal your body to stop producing copious amounts of milk.

I’d recommend keeping a small towel in your purse (speaking from experience.) You might also want to stash an extra shirt in the car – and a bra -just sayin.

And you know what? You can ask for help. Have daddy or grandparents, other family members or good friends hold the bottle and make funny faces. Sometimes it actually helps to have someone without your familiar breasts, smell and voice take part in introducing the bottle to your baby.

Every mother who has breastfed has her own stories to tell when it came time to wean her infant. You’ll have yours and most likely you’ll smile and say softly – Ah yes, I remember breastfeeding (and baby cereal). 

Your Baby

Should Women Eat Fish While Pregnant?

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Fish are high in several beneficial nutrients, including some that are related to healthy brain development. But several organizations, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), recommend that women who are pregnant limit the amount of fish they eat.

The reason is that most fish and shellfish contain low-levels of methylmercury.

Almost all people have at least trace amounts of methylmercury in their tissues, reflecting the organic compound’s widespread presence in the environment. Fetuses, infants and children are the most vulnerable to the possible adverse effects of mercury exposure.

One of the major concerns of the medical community and mothers-to-be is the possibility of a link between eating fish that contains mercury, and their child developing autism.  

A new study addresses that concern and says that children exposed to low levels of mercury in the womb because their mothers ate large amounts of fish, don’t appear to be at an increased risk for autism.

The new findings from more than 30 years of research in the Republic of Seychelles -- a group of islands in the western Indian Ocean -- found no such link, the study authors said.

"This study shows no evidence of a correlation between low level mercury exposure and autism spectrum-like behaviors among children whose mothers ate, on average, up to 12 meals of fish each week during pregnancy," study lead author Edwin van Wijngaarden, associate professor in the public health sciences department at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York, said in a medical center news release.

"These findings contribute to the growing body of literature that suggest that exposure to the chemical does not play an important role in the onset of these behaviors," he added.

One autism expert added a note of caution, however.

"The study found no link between high mercury levels and later autism spectrum disorder behaviors. However, this should not be taken to mean that high levels of mercury are safe to ingest," said Alycia Hallday, senior director of environmental and clinical science at the advocacy group Autism Speaks.

"Other studies comparing this [Seychelles] cohort to those in other parts of the world indicate that this cohort may be spared from many adverse effects because it is consumed with nutrient-rich ocean fish," she explained.

For the study, the researchers initially determined the level of prenatal mercury exposure by analyzing the mothers' hair samples. Then the researchers used two questionnaires -- one given to parents, the other to the children's teachers -- to see if the children showed signs of autism spectrum-like behaviors. The tests included questions on language skills, communication skills and repetitive behaviors. While the tests don't give a definitive diagnosis, they are used widely in the United States as an initial screening tool and may indicate the need for additional testing, the researchers said.

The study also noted the concerns of and limitations recommended by the FDA and other organizations.

"This study shows no consistent association in children with mothers with mercury levels that were six to 10 times higher than those found in the U.S. and Europe. This is a sentinel population and if (the association between low-level mercury exposure and autism) does not exist here than it probably does not exist," Philip Davidson, principal investigator of the Seychelles Child Development Study and professor emeritus in pediatrics at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said in the news release.

The finding lends support to an emerging belief that the good may outweigh the possible bad when it comes to eating fish during pregnancy. Specifically, if the mercury did not harm brain development at the levels of exposure experienced by the children in this study, then the benefits of the nutrients in fish may counteract or surpass the potential negative effects of mercury, the study authors said.

So, which fish have “low” or “high” mercury content? The American Pregnancy Association provides this list on their website.

Highest Mercury

AVOID

  • Marlin
  • Orange roughy
  • Tilefish
  • Swordfish
  • Shark
  • Mackerel (king)
  • Tuna (bigeye, Ahi)

High Mercury

Eat no more than three 6-oz servings per month

  • Sea Bass (Chilean)
  • Bluefish
  • Grouper
  • Mackerel (Spanish, Gulf)
  • Tuna (canned, white albacore) See tuna chart below
  • Tuna (Yellow fin)

Lower Mercury

Eat no more than six 6-oz servings per month

  • Bass (Striped, Black)
  • Carp
  • Cod (Alaskan)
  • Croaker (White Pacific)
  • Halibut ( Pacific and Atlantic) Jacksmelt ( Silverside)
  • Lobster
  • Mahi Mahi
  • Monkfish
  • Perch (freshwater)
  • Sablefish
  • Skate
  • Snapper
  • Sea Trout (Weakfish)
  • Tuna (canned, chunk light)
  • Tuna (Skipjack)

Lowest Mercury

Enjoy two 6-oz servings per week

  • Anchovies
  • Butterfish
  • Catfish
  • Clam
  • Crab (Domestic)
  • Crawfish/crayfish
  • Croaker
  • Flounder
  • Haddock
  • Hake
  • Herring
  • Mackerel (N Atlantic, Chub)
  • Mullet
  • Oysters
  • Perch (ocean)
  • Plaice
  • Salmon (Canned, Fresh)
  • Sardines
  • Scallops
  • Shad (American)
  • Shrimp
  • Sole
  • Squid (Calamari)
  • Tilapia
  • Trout (freshwater)
  • Whitefish
  • Whiting

The study was published online July 23 in the journal Epidemiology

Sources: http://consumer.healthday.com/pregnancy-information-29/pregnancy-news-543/breaking-brief-7-23-mercury-autism-epidemiology-urmc-release-678533.html

http://americanpregnancy.org/pregnancyhealth/fishmercury.htm

http://www.epa.gov/hg/effects.htm

Your Baby

Kids Left In Car Alert Devises Aren't Reliable

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It’s hot outside, but inside a car that's not running, it can be an oven. When the temperature is 88 degrees outside, a closed car will be 99 degrees in 10 minute. In 20 minutes it will be 117 degrees. During a typical Texas summer, it’s likely to be 100 degrees outside by noon.

Every summer children are left in hot cars and die. These are all preventable deaths.

Products designed to prevent parents and caregivers from accidentally leaving babies and toddlers in cars have become quite popular. But a review of 18 commercial devices, including systems integrated into a car, shows none works well enough to rely on.

“While these devices are very well-intended, none of them are a full or complete solution for making sure a parent never leaves a baby behind in a hot car,” David Strickland, administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), told reporters.

NHTSA says 527 children have died of heat stroke after being left in cars since 1998, or about 38 every year. “In 2011, 33 such cases were reported,” NHTSA said in a statement, citing Jan Null of San Francisco State University, who tracks the reports.

“We aren’t only talking about the 98 degree day when you leave your child for eight hours while you are at work,” said Dr. Kristy Arbogast of The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, who led the research. “This can happen very quickly.”

Arbogast and colleagues reviewed every product they could find: pads that sense if a child is in his or her car seat; devices that detect whether the seatbelt is buckled; chest clips that attach to the restraint; sensors that can tell if the back door was opened; and alarms that remind parents to check. They thoroughly tested three of the devices.

“The devices were inconsistent and unreliable in their performance,” they wrote in their report, commissioned by NHTSA and released on Monday.

“They often required adjusting of the position of the child within the child restraint, the distance to activation varied across trials and scenarios and they experienced continual synching/un-synching during use,” they added.

Sometimes a cell-phone interfered with the device, and spilled juice or milk could knock some out completely. “In sum, the devices require considerable effort from the parent/caregiver to ensure smooth operation and often that operation is not consistent,” Arbogast’s team concluded. “None directly address the root cause of the hot environment that led to the potential for heat stroke.”

Many relied on an alarm that was on the car’s key fob and that worried Arbogast. “What if my husband was taking the child and I forget to give him the key fob?” she asked.

“Most important, it should be noted that these devices which integrate into a child restraint would not be applicable in scenarios where the child is playing and gets locked in the vehicle (30 percent of fatalities) or in a scenario where the parent/caregiver intentionally leaves the child in the vehicle (17 percent of fatalities),” the report notes.

Parents have seen the reports of these tragedies and are looking for help to protect their child. “There has been a recent rise in demand for technologies to prevent these deaths by reminding the caregiver that the child is in the car, as about half of these children have inadvertently been forgotten,” the report reads.

Experts suggest that parents and caregivers “layer” their routine by adding steps to exiting the car. Put your purse or briefcase in the backseat as a reminder. You might even want to consider putting one shoe in the back seat, anything that will remind you to look at your child before you leave the car. 

Other suggestions parents or caregivers might want to try:

- Leave a large teddy bear in the front seat as a reminder.

- Setting an alarm on your cell phone to remind you to check for your child. Set it for about the time it usually takes to arrive where you are going.

- Having a routine with the child’s caregiver. “If it is well-established that when your child shows up in the morning, if they don’t show up within 10 minutes of that time the daycare provider calls you or sends a text,” Arbogast suggested.

Source: http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/07/30/13033698-devices-cant-save-ba...(direct)|utmccn=(direct)|utmcmd=(none)&__utmv=238145375.|8=Earned%20By=msnbc%7Chealth=1^12=Landing%20Content=Mixed=1^13=Landing%20Hostname=www.msnbc.msn.com=1^30=Visit%20Type%20to%20Content=Earned%20to%20Mixed=1&__utmk=69486035

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