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Parenting

Picky Eaters and Personality

1:45

If you have a child that is a picky eater, the reason may have more to do with his or her personality than the food you give them, according to a new study.

Researchers found that little ones who were more naturally inhibited also tended to be picky eaters.

"From the time they're very young, some infants are more 'approaching' and react positively to new things, whereas other infants are more 'withdrawing' and react negatively to the same stimuli," said study author Kameron Moding.

"But very few studies have examined whether infants show similar approach and withdrawal behaviors in response to new foods, so this is what we wanted to investigate," added Moding. She is a postdoctoral fellow at University of Colorado, Denver.

Researchers observed how 136 infants responded to new foods and toys during the first 18 months of life. They found that the children who were more reserved about playing with new toys were also more reserved about trying new foods.

The researchers determined that there might be a link between personality types and attitudes about food.

"It was striking how consistently the responses to new foods related to the responses to new toys," Moding said in a Penn State news release.

"Not only were they associated at 12 months, but those responses also predicted reactions to new objects six months later. They also followed the same developmental pattern across the first year of life," she added.

Getting some children to try new foods can be a challenge, but Moding says parents shouldn’t give up offering a variety of foods to their kids.

Keep trying! Research from other labs has consistently shown that infants and children can learn to accept new foods if their caregivers continue to offer them," Moding said. "It can take as many as eight to 10 tries, but infants and children can learn to accept and eat even initially disliked foods."

Story source: Robert Preidt, https://consumer.healthday.com/caregiving-information-6/infant-and-child-care-health-news-410/picky-eater-it-might-just-be-your-child-s-personality-725183.html

Parenting

Host A CPR Party!

2:00

Many of us are familiar with kitchenware, make-up and clothes parties. You know, the kind where someone hosts a get-together of 10-15 family members, friends and friends of friends to sell you something you can’t live without.

A new trend is beginning to catch on for parties with a different take on something you can’t live without- the breath of life. They’re called CPR parties.

Parents around the country are hosting CPR parties to educate other parents and community members on how to properly apply CPR in cases of an emergency such as a drowning, electrical shock or choking.

There are different types of parties. Some are non-certified classes that are often associated with organizations that promote family CPR education.  Sometimes there’s a small fee associated with the party. No one receives a certificate of completion or takes a written test at the end of the instruction; however, they are asked to participate in the CPR exercises.

Certification classes are also available where participants do take a written test as well as do the CPR exercises.

A CPR party can include any level of CPR such as infant, child or adult. You can also learn what do in case of a choking.

DVDs with step-by-step instructions are often used in the non-certified parties.

For certification parties, a host may receive free training, take the test at the end of the class and receive his or her 2-year certification, plus training manuals and materials with ideas on how to host the party.

If you’re uncomfortable with instructing a small group, many times a certified instructor can be brought in for a fee.

The main reason for hosting a CPR party is to help neighbors, friends and family members be prepared if a child or an adult goes into cardiac arrest. Calling 911 should always be the first step, but before medical professionals arrive, immediately performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) will greatly increase his or her chance for survival. In fact, a recent study by the National Institutes of Health shows CPR to be effective in children and adolescents who suffer from non-traumatic cardiac arrest due to drowning, electrocution, or choking.

When someone suffers an out of hospital heart attack, they often don’t receive the help they need before the ambulance arrives, simply because the people around them don’t know CPR.

CPR party experts recommend making the get-together a fun experience with heart decorations and treats. You can combine them with baby showers, moms groups, and family reunions; any time that friends and/ or family are gathered together.

There are several organizations that offer information on how to host a CPR party. A few of them are:

·      Code Blue CPR - http://www.codebluemedcpr.com/cpr-parties.html

·      CPR Party - https://www.thecprparty.org

·      The Stork Stops Here - http://www.thestorkstopshere.com/TrainingHealth.html

·      Hands on Heart CPR - http://www.handsonheartcpr.com/cpr-party.html

Next time you’re searching for a party theme, consider a CPR party. What a marvelous gift you’ll have given your guests- the knowledge to possibly save a life one day!

Parenting

Mumps Reach 10 Year High; Hitting Colleges and Kids Hard

1:45

Mumps are making a comeback, particularly on college campuses and in daycare centers.

A recent U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report shows that mumps are at a 10-year high. As of November, 45 states and the District of Columbia had reported a total of 2,879 mumps infections — more than double the mumps cases reported in 2015.

Mumps is a contagious disease caused by a virus. Common symptoms can include swollen glands in front of and below the ear or under the jaw, pain with opening and closing the jaw, fever, fatigue and malaise, headache and earache.

Currently, college campuses are taking the brunt of the mumps outbreak.

Dr. Michael Grosso, medical director and CMO of Huntington Hospital/Northwell Health, said close quarters such as dormitory living, can make it easier to pick up the virus.

“It’s spread through respiratory secretions, coughing, sneezing, close contact and sharing the same cups and utensils,” Grosso told CBS News.

Some colleges, such as The University of Missouri’s Columbia, are asking students to restrict their social activities and to make sure they get immunized. Typically, two doses of vaccine are recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the CDC, but the school is asking students to get a third measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine “based on discussions with public health officials and consistent with guidance from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.”

College students aren’t the only ones being hit hard by mumps; younger children are also experiencing a rise in reported cases. More parents have opted-out of getting their children the MMR vaccine - putting non-immunized children at a higher risk.

Daycare centers are similar to college dormitories in that they provide an environment where a virus can be easily spread.

While most mumps cases are mild, albeit, uncomfortable, others can be more serious.

“Most individuals recover uneventfully from mumps, however as many as 10 percent of males who get mumps will get an inflammation of the testes which can lead to permanent sterility,” Grosso said.

The brain can also be affected. About 1 percent of people who come down with the mumps get serious brain infections and can experience meningitis, encephalitis and deafness associated with a brain infection.

“That small risk was behind the original impetus to create a vaccine,” Grosso said.

 Physicians are urging students to get the immunizations and to practice good hygiene. Simple steps such as covering your cough or sneeze, washing your hands with soap and water or using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, avoiding sharing food, drinks, cups or utensils can help prevent the spread of viruses.

Vaccines are still the most effective way to lower your risk of getting the mumps.  No vaccine is a 100 percent protective, Grosso notes, but it can help you avoid the risk of serious illness and lifelong health issues.

“Receiving two doses of mumps vaccines is said to confer about an 88 percent reduction in risk of getting mumps if you’re exposed,” said Grosso. A third dose may increase those odds.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the first dose of MMR vaccine should be administered between 12 and 15 months of age, and the second dose between 4 to 6 years of age.

Grosso emphasizes that parents need to get their children vaccinated early.

“Being immunized late is better than not being immunized ever. But being immunized late is not nearly as good as being immunized on time,” Grosso said.

Story sources: Mary Brophy Marcus, http://www.cbsnews.com/news/mumps-cases-10-year-high-college-outbreaks-vaccination/

https://www.cdc.gov/mumps/

Parenting

When is Your Child Ready for a Cell Phone?

3:00

Did you know that ninety-five percent of Americans own a cell phone of some kind? The percentage of cell phone ownership among 18-29 year –olds is even higher at 100%, according to the Pew Research Center on Internet and Technology.

It’s no surprise that more and more young kids are asking their parents to get them one.

So, what is the appropriate age to give your child a phone? The answer depends on several factors.

There’s no doubt about the convenience of having a cell phone handy when you need to communicate with someone. If your child has a cell phone, you can call or text him to find out where he is and what he's doing and inform him of your own plans. It can make you feel safer just knowing where your kids are. And in an emergency, a cell phone can be crucial if your child needs to reach you -- or vice versa.

While there are many good reasons to have a cell phone on hand, there are some down sides too.

One thing to consider is that they can become addictive. Sending and receiving texts, playing video games, watching movies as well as checking in on social media sites can impact your child’s sleep patterns and psychological wellbeing. Do you think your child is able to handle that kind of extra stress? Are you willing to put in the time, or have the time yourself, to monitor your child’s phone use and lay down the rules about how often they can use their phone?

There are also other health considerations; cell phones use radio waves. That's radiation (though it's not like what you'd get from an X-ray). Can cell phone radiation affect your child’s health, especially if children start using phones at a very young age when their brains are still developing?

In 2011, an international study showed no link between cell phone use and brain tumors in adolescents and teens. The researchers pointed out, though, that the people in that study didn't use their phones as much as people do today. Many health experts believe more current studies need to be done over a longer period of time. It may be take several decades to find the answer.

Social interaction and cell phone use go hand in hand. It can often be positive thing. It's one way kids can learn to relate to other kids. But there is also the potential for "cyber bullying” which is social harassment via text, instant messaging, or other social media. Many smartphones have a "location sharing" feature, which could raise concerns about people stalking kids as they go from place to place.

There isn't a lot of research yet on how cell phones affect mental and emotional health. But early studies show that frequent texting and emailing can disrupt kids' concentration. It can also become compulsive if kids start being "on call" 24/7 to keep up with their friends. That’s one of the addictive challenges – even for adults.

A child’s age shouldn’t be the only determining factor before deciding on when children are ready for their own cell phone.

Caroline Knorr, parenting editor with the nonprofit group Common Sense Media, says, "Maturity and the ability to be responsible are more important than a child's numerical age.

She says, "We want our kids to be independent, to be able to walk home from school and play at the playground without us. We want them to have that old-fashioned, fun experience of being on their own, and cell phones can help with that. But parents have to do their research and talk to their children and make sure they're using the phones safely themselves, too."

As your child becomes more independent (think middle school or high school), they're closer to needing a phone than younger children whom you still take everywhere.

"Look for the developmental signs," Evans says. "Does your child lose his belongings? Is he generally a responsible kid? Can you trust him? Will he understand how to use the phone safely? The rate at which kids mature varies -- it will even be different among siblings."

And think long and hard about whether your child actually needs rather than just wants that phone. "Children really only need phones if they're traveling alone from place to place," Evans says. "Kids in carpools may not need phones, but kids traveling on a subway, bus or walking to school may. It's about who they are as individuals, what's going on in their lives, and how much they can handle, not a certain age or grade."

If you’ve made the decision that your little one can have a cell phone, here are some ideas to make it work for you and your child.

Should you check who your child is calling and what she's tweeting?

Absolutely, Knorr says. "I know that kids consider mobile devices to be personal property," she says. "And they don't want their parents snooping around. But I think parents are justified in saying, 'I understand this can be used for good but it also can be misused. So every now and then I'm going to check to make sure you're using it responsibly and respectfully.' Then make it an ongoing dialogue: 'Have you gotten weird texts?' 'Any calls that made you uncomfortable?' 'Who are you texting?'"

But you might want to skip the GPS locator services. Neither Knorr nor Evans recommends them unless your child is showing a pattern of getting into trouble.

"Most kids don't need GPS trackers on them," Evans says. "That's really feeding on our anxiety as parents more than meeting a true safety need."

"The issue is really about educating children how to use cell phones in appropriate ways," Evans says. "Cell phones can definitely be beneficial, as long as you know your individual child."

Start with a basic phone for a young child. There are still phones that do not include a camera, Internet access, games or texting.  You’ll most likely get some push back from your child on this, so be prepared to tell him or her why your starting with this type of phone. “ Remind her (or him) that phones are tools, not toys. "It's about safety, not social status or games," Knorr says.

If your child’s phone has texting or Internet abilities, set limits. Most cell phone companies allow you to cap the number of texts a user can send or receive as well as the number of minutes the cell phone can be used. You also can block Internet access and calls from unapproved numbers on most phones.

Designate times when the phone needs to be turned off such as meal times, study time, out walking and at least an hour before bedtime.

Provide your child with and teach them how to use earphones. Until more is known about the impact of cell phone radiation, it’s better to be safe than sorry.  However, also teach them the appropriate places to wear earphones. It can be dangerous for children (and adults) to wear them when walking or bicycling – they may not be able to hear oncoming traffic. It also can take their focus off of what is going on around them.

Teach your child good cell phone etiquette. Children aren't born knowing the rules about how to use cell phones respectfully, including not using them to spread rumors, not taking (or sending) photos without people's permission, not sending inappropriate photos or texts, not having personal conversations in public places – and, of course, never communicating with strangers, no matter how they present themselves. It's up to you to teach them. And by all means, make sure you obey the same rules. Children learn more by watching how their parents handle things than by simply being told what to do.

There’s also a clever contract you can sign with your child when you give them the cell phone. It sets certain rules that they agree to follow and is a good resource that can be reviewed time and time again. CTIA has it listed and printable at this link.

It’s a different world than when we were kids. For most parents, cell phones either didn’t exist or were not as complex and portable as they are now. So, when do you give your child his or her own cell phone? Only after careful consideration to how it will impact their life. Once he or she owns one, it will be an extreme challenge to take it back.

Story source:  Susan Davis, http://www.webmd.com/parenting/features/children-and-cell-phones#1

http://files.ctia.org/pdf/bsw/example_of_family_rules.pdf

 

 

Parenting

Bedwetting Causes and Coping Tips

2:00

Most children will go through a bedwetting stage and though some kids get through it rather quickly, others take longer before they have consistently dry nights.

Bedwetting can also be a symptom of an underlying disease, but not typically. In fact, an underlying condition is identified in only about 1% of children who routinely wet the bed.

Bedwetting is not only difficult for the child, but it can strain a parent’s patience as well. It’s important to remember that a child that wets the bed doesn’t do it intentionally. Children who wet are not lazy, willful, or disobedient. Bedwetting is most often a developmental issue.

Did you know that there are 2 types of bedwetting? They are called primary and secondary. A child with primary bedwetting has episodes of bedwetting on a consistent basis. Secondary bedwetting is bedwetting that starts up after the child has been dry at night for a significant period of time, at least 6 months.

So, what causes primary bedwetting? It’s usually a combination of factors:

  • The child cannot yet hold urine for the entire night.
  • The child does not waken when his or her bladder is full.
  • The child produces a large amount of urine during the evening and night hours.
  • The child habitually ignores the urge to urinate and put off urinating as long as they possibly can. Parents usually are familiar with the leg crossing, face straining, squirming, squatting, and groin holding that children use to hold back urine.

Secondary bedwetting may occur because of an underlying or known medical condition or emotional problems. The child with secondary bedwetting is much more likely to have other symptoms, such as daytime wetting.  Reasons for secondary bedwetting can include:

  • Urinary tract infection: The resulting bladder irritation can cause severe pain or irritation with urination, a stronger urge to urinate, and frequent urination. Urinary tract infections in children may indicate another problem, such as an anatomical abnormality.
  • Diabetes: People with diabetes have a high level of sugar in their blood. The body increases urine output to try to get rid of the sugar. Having to urinate frequently is a common symptom of diabetes.
  • Structural or anatomical abnormality: An abnormality in the organs, muscles, or nerves involved in urination can cause incontinence or other urinary problems that could show up as bedwetting.
  • Neurological problems: Abnormalities in the nervous system, or injury or disease of the nervous system, can upset the delicate neurological balance that controls urination.
  • Emotional problems: A stressful home life, as in a home where the parents are in conflict, sometimes causes children to wet the bed. Major changes, such as starting school, a new baby, or moving to a new home, are other stresses that can also cause bedwetting. Children who are being physically or sexually abused sometimes begin bedwetting.

If your child suddenly begins to wet the bed after months or years of dry nights, talk to your child about it and your pediatrician. Your doctor may want to do an examination and bloodwork to rule out any health conditions. 

Most children do not stay dry at night until about the age of three.  And it's usually not a concern for parents until around age 6.

Bedwetting can be embarrassing for children. Be supportive and reassure your child that they won’t always wet the bed. Bedwetting often runs in families. If you want to share your own personal story, your child may see that people do outgrow it.

To help your child make it through the night dry, make sure he or she isn’t drinking a lot of liquids before bedtime. Make using the bathroom just before they get in bed part of a bedtime routine. Also remind them that it's OK to get up during the night to use the bathroom. Nightlights can help your child find his or her own way when they need to go.

Some parents wonder if they should wake their child up during the night to go. That’s a personal choice, however, keep in mind that if you deprive your child of rest and sleep, you may increase his or her level of stress. Stress can be a bedwetting trigger. Some children may also have a difficult time getting back to sleep once woken.

If your child wets the bed, you might consider getting a plastic bed cover to help protect the mattress.

If accidents do happen, try these tips to remove the smell and stains from linens, clothes and the mattress.

  • Try adding a half-cup to a cup of white vinegar to your wash to remove the smell from their sheets and clothes.
  • If you need to clean urine from a mattress, first use towels to blot up as much as you can.
  • Once you've blotted up as much of the urine as you can, saturate the entire area of urine stain with hydrogen peroxide. Let it stand for 5 minutes, and then use towels again to blot the area dry.
  • Once the mattress is dry, sprinkle baking soda over the entire area and let it stand for 24 hours. The next day, vacuum the baking soda away. It should be clean and odor free.

Bedwetting is one of those stages that kids go through that some day will just be a memory. Until then, reassure your little one that this too shall pass. Praise your child when they make it through the night without wetting the bed and let them know that if an accident happens, it’s OK – we’ll try again tonight.

Story sources: http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/guide/bedwetting-causes#2

http://www.webmd.com/parenting/ss/slideshow-bedwetting

 

Parenting

Fourth of July Safety Tips

2:00

For Americans, it doesn’t get any more patriotic than Independence Day- or as most folks call it- July 4th.  The holiday celebrates the adoption of the Declaration of Independence, drafted by Thomas Jefferson, in 1776.

It’s traditionally been a high-spirited holiday with fireworks, casual family and friends’ gatherings, parades, lake and pool parties, music and lots of food. 

All these activities help build life’s memorable moments, however, the one memory you don’t want is a visit to the emergency room.

Here are some safety tips to keep in mind while enjoying the Fourth:

Fireworks: It’s really best to leave fireworks to the professionals, but if you’re planning on setting off some during the Fourth of July celebrations, follow these tips:

1. Be sure fireworks are legal in your area before using or buying them

2. Always have an adult supervise fireworks activities and never allow children to play with or ignite fireworks. Sparklers alone account for one quarter of emergency room fireworks injuries

3. If you set off fireworks, keep a bucket of water or fire extinguisher handy in case of malfunction or fire.

4. If fireworks malfunction, don’t relight them! Douse and soak them with water then throw them away.

5. Never ignite fireworks in a container, especially one that is glass or metal.

Grilling: Malfunctioning gas grills cause the majority of grill fires. In addition, thousands of people visit emergency rooms every year because they have burned themselves while barbecuing.

1.     Use your grill well away from your home and deck railings, and out from under branches or overhangs.

2.     Open your gas grill before lighting.

3.     Periodically remove grease or fat buildup in trays below your gas or propane grill so it cannot be ignited.

4.     Declare a three-foot "kid and pet-free zone" around the grill to keep them safe.

5.     Avoid loose clothing that can catch fire when cooking on the grill.

Water Safety: According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, about one in five people who die from drowning are children 14 and younger. For every child who dies from drowning, another five receive emergency department care for nonfatal submersion injuries.

1.     Never leave a young child unattended near water and do not trust a child’s life to another child; teach children to always ask permission to go near water.

2.     Have young children or inexperienced swimmers wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets around water, but do not rely on life jackets alone.

3.     Establish rules for your family and enforce them without fail. For example, set limits based on each person’s ability, do not let anyone play around drains and suction fittings, and do not allow swimmers to hyperventilate before swimming under water or have breath-holding contests.

4.     Even if you do not plan on swimming, be cautious around natural bodies of water including ocean shoreline, rivers and lakes. Cold temperatures, currents and underwater hazards can make a fall into these bodies of water dangerous.

5.     If you go boating, wear a life jacket! Most boating fatalities occur from drowning.

6.     Avoid alcohol use. Alcohol impairs judgment, balance and coordination; affects swimming and diving skills; and reduces the body’s ability to stay warm.

7.     Always keep a charged cell phone with you for emergency use, but do not get distracted using your phone to text, surf the net or reading emails.

July 4th is a historic holiday and one that holds a special place in America’s heart.  Make sure your 4th is memorable for all the right reasons.

Happy Independence Day!

Story sources: https://www.fema.gov/news-release/2016/06/30/ten-safety-tips-4th-july

https://www.cdc.gov/homeandrecreationalsafety/water-safety/waterinjuries-factsheet.html

http://www.iii.org/article/grilling-safely

 

Parenting

Happy July 4! Fun Facts for Kids

1:45

Happy Birthday America! Here are some fun facts to share with your kids about America’s most personal holiday.

July 4th became the official birthday of the United States in 1776, when the Continental Congress approved the Declaration of Independence. The Continental Congress, also known as the Philadelphia Congress, was a convention of delegates called together to represent the 13 colonies. It became the governing body of the United States during the American Revolution.

The Declaration of Independence was actually a letter to King George of England written by Thomas Jefferson.

Jefferson was just thirty-three years old at the time and the youngest member of Congress. He would later become the 3rd President of the United States, from 1801 to 1809.

In his letter to King George, Jefferson explained why America was declaring its independence with a list of charges against the king. Colonists were angry that they had to pay taxes to the British government, but they had no voice or vote in the decisions that affected their lives.

56 men representing the 13 colonies signed the Declaration of Independence. The signing of this document marked the beginning of an all-out war against the British government for freedom.

The first signature on the Declaration of Independence was John Hancock, a wealthy merchant and President of the Continental Congress. He later served as the first and third Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

Three U.S. presidents have died on July 4th and one was actually born on this prestigious date. John Adams and Thomas Jefferson passed away within hours of each other on July 4, 1826. James Monroe died on July 4, 1831. Calvin Coolidge was born on July 4, 1872.

It wasn’t until 1870 that Congress made the 4th of July a federal holiday. At first, it was an unpaid holiday for federal employees but Congress changed it to a paid federal holiday in 1941.

The first public Fourth of July event at the White House occurred in 1804. The first Independence Day celebration west of the Mississippi occurred at Independence Creek and was celebrated by explorers, Lewis and Clark in 1805.

The youngest signer of the Declaration of Independence was Edward Rutledge, aged 26, and a delegate from South Carolina to the Continental Congress. The oldest signer was Benjamin Franklin, aged 70, and one of the founding fathers of the United States.

Today, July 4th is celebrated throughout the country with patriotic parades, fireworks, picnics, concerts and family gatherings as many citizens fly the American flag in support of our many wartime heroes and our independence.

Have a fabulous 4th!

Story source: https://kidskonnect.com/holidays-seasons/fourth-july/

 

Parenting

Taking Anti-Depressants During Pregnancy

2:30

There have been several studies examining the health risks to babies when moms-to-be take anti-depressants during pregnancy. Research is showing that many antidepressants, especially the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and older medications, are generally safe. Birth defects and other problems are possible. But the risk is very low.

One concern pregnant women have had is; will taking anti-depressants harm my baby’s intellectual, neurological and social development development?

Recently, in a first-of its kind study, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found a slight elevated risk of intellectual disability (ID) in children born to mothers treated with antidepressants, but the risk was not statistically significant and is likely due to other factors, including parental age and the parents' psychiatric history.

While other studies have examined the risk of autism in mother's who took antidepressants during pregnancy, this is the first study to examine the risk of ID in this population.

What is intellectual disability? According to the American Association of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD), intellectual disability is a disability characterized by significant limitations both in intellectual functioning (reasoning, learning, problem solving) and in adaptive behavior, which covers a range of everyday social and practical skills. This disability originates before the age of 18. The term intellectual disability covers the same population of individuals who were diagnosed previously with mental retardation. It’s now the preferred term of use.

For the study, researchers examined the risk of ID in 179,000 children born in Sweden in 2006 and 2007. Approximately 4,000 of those children were exposed to antidepressants and other psychotropic medications during pregnancy. The researchers compared the risk in these children with a subsample of 23,551children whose mothers were diagnosed with depression or anxiety prior to childbirth but did not use antidepressants during pregnancy.

The results showed that the risk of ID after exposure to antidepressant medication was not much different between both groups. ID was diagnosed in about 0.9% of exposed children and 0.5% of unexposed children.

"Our study provides more information for clinicians to evaluate the risks in pregnant women taking antidepressants," said co-author Abraham Reichenberg, PhD, Professor of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. "It should be factored into other considerations such as the increased risk for the mother if not medicated, the drug's side effects, and other medical conditions."

The study will be published online in JAMA Psychiatry.

Webmd.com makes some good points about pregnancy and anti-depressants and offers tips for mothers-to-be that suffer from depression. Both psychiatric experts and ob-gyn experts agree that if you have mild depression and have been symptom-free for at least six months, you may be able to stop using antidepressants under a doctor’s supervision before getting pregnant or while you are pregnant. Psychotherapy, along with lifestyle measures, may be all that you need to manage your depression. You may be able to get through your pregnancy without antidepressants if you:

  • Talk with a therapist on a regular basis
  • Exercise more
  • Spend time outside
  • Practice yoga and meditation
  • Minimize your stress

But, the experts point out, it will be better for both you and your baby to stay on antidepressants while pregnant if any of the following is true:

  • You have a history of severe or recurrent depression
  • You have a history of other mental illnesses, such as bipolar disorder
  • You have ever been suicidal

Few, if any, medications are considered absolutely safe during pregnancy. Research findings on the effects of antidepressants on the growing baby are mixed and inconclusive. One study may find a particular antidepressant causes one type of risk. Another one, though, may find that it doesn’t. Also, the risks to the baby may be different depending on the type of antidepressant and when in the pregnancy it is taken. Regardless, most risks found by researchers have been low.

Story sources: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/07/170712110441.htm

http://www.webmd.com/baby/pregnancy-and-antidepressants#1

Parenting

Teaching Your Child Healthy Hair Care Habits

1:45

Teaching your child good hair care practices can help him or her maintain healthy and shiny locks throughout their life. It can also help prevent hair damage and skin conditions such as dandruff.

You’ve probably been washing your hair more years than you can remember by now, but there was a time when you had to learn what to do with shampoo and water.

If your child has reached the age where he or she can start washing their own hair, here are some tips to help them develop good hair care habits.

You’d be surprised how many kids think that washing their hair means just that – washing only their hair. Healthy skin and hair requires washing the scalp and the hair.

How often should your child wash his or her hair? The answer to that question depends on several factors. For example, during the summer, when kids are more likely to be playing outdoors or involved in sports, they may need to wash their hair as often as every other day. In the drier winter months when kids typically spend more time indoors, the schedule may be pushed back a day or two.

You also have to consider your child’s hair type. Does it tend to be dry or oily? Is it fine, curly, thick, thin or coarse? Different hair types require different care programs.

On an average, kids around 12 years old or who have started puberty and have fine, straight or thin hair, might need to shampoo as often as every other day. At this age, many kids are beginning to experience hormonal changes, causing their hair and scalp to be a little oilier.

For younger children, once or twice a week is sufficient – again, if they haven’t been doing something that would cause their hair to be excessively dirty.

For children with dry, curly or very coarse hair, washing their hair too often can be drying to the scalp and the hair. African American children often have at least a couple of these hair types. Washing their hair once a week or once every two weeks is sufficient if their hair isn’t too dirty. They may also benefit from using a moisturizing shampoo made especially for their hair type as well as a conditioner.

Healthy hair care begins with learning how to wash the hair without damaging it. When your child is ready to start shampooing, follow these steps to help your child develop healthy hair-care habits.

•       Wet hair and scalp with warm water. Shampoo works best on wet heads and hair.

•       Pour a quarter-size drop of shampoo in the palm of your child’s hand. Putting the shampoo in the hand first makes it easier to apply.

•       Tell your child to massage the shampoo gently into the scalp. When shampooing, it’s important to wash the scalp rather than the entire length of the hair. Washing only the hair often leads to flyaway hair that is dull and coarse. Rubbing shampoo into the hair can break hairs, leading to unhealthy looking hair.

•       Rinse well with warm water until the hair is suds-free. Rinsing well washes away shampoo and dirt.

•       Cover hair with a towel. Help your child wrap a towel around the wet hair. This helps to absorb the water. Rubbing hair dry with a towel can damage the hair, causing it to break.

•       Comb out damp hair gently. Use a wide-tooth comb, especially on curly hair. Don’t yank or pull the comb through the hair because that can pull out hair or break the hair.

•       Sometimes a de-tangling spray can help smooth out the hair and keep it from forming little tight knots.

To help kids develop good hair-care habits that help prevent hair damage, dermatologists give parents the following tips:

•       Make braids and ponytails loose and use covered rubber bands.

•       Consider styles that don’t require heat and chemical treatments.

•       When using heat on the hair, lower the heat.

•       Understand that chemicals in relaxers, dyes, and other hairstyling products often damage the hair. The longer the time between treatments, the better it is for your hair. 

•       After your child swims, make sure to wash away pool chemicals. If your child’s hair is normal to oily, shampooing works best. Children who have very dry or African American hair should rinse well and apply conditioner. Pool chemicals that are not washed away can damage hair.

•       Use a wide-tooth comb more often than a brush.

•       When outdoors, wear a wide-brimmed hat to protect the scalp and hair from the sun.

All hair needs to be treated gently, especially when it’s wet. Brushing or combing hair too frequently or in the wrong way (such as using a fine-toothed comb on very thick, curly hair or teasing hair) can lead to breakage. Hair extensions and braids can also cause breakage. Leaving them in too long or pulling them out without professional help can cause hair and scalp damage or even hair loss.

The condition of our hair can also tell us about our general health. Sometimes hair breakage and dry, brittle hair are signs of a medical problem, such as hypothyroidism or an eating disorder. If your child’s hair is breaking or falling out, even though he or she doesn’t treat it with chemicals or other styling products, tell your pediatrician.

Healthy hair doesn’t just happen; it’s the result of proper care and maintenance. Starting your child on healthy hair care habits early will most likely be how they think about and care for their scalp and hair the rest of their lives.

Story sources: https://www.aad.org/public/skin-hair-nails/hair-care/healthy-hair-habits-for-kids

http://naturalhairkids.com/basic-regimen/

 

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