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Parenting

“10 Worst Toys” List for 2017

2:00

Since 1973, an annual list of the top 10 most dangerous toys has been issued by the Boston based non-profit organization, World Against Toys Causing Harm, Inc. (W.A.T.C.H.)

This year’s list includes such favorites as fidget spinners, a Wonder Woman Battle-Action Sword and a Spider-Man Drone.

Strings, small parts, rigid surfaces, projectile pieces and toys that emit toxic substances are all potentially unsafe when it comes to toys, warned WATCH President Joan Siff and Director James Swartz at a press conference.

"It's alarming that there are so many toys out there that are unsafe," Siff told USA TODAY. "These are not the only ones." Since December, there have been 15 toy recalls in the U.S., according to Siff. 

The Toy Association, an industry group, says the lists are unnecessary and only create panic among consumers.

Both sides agree that parents should examine toys before giving them to children to look for any potential hazard.

Here’s this year’s WATCH list:

1.     Itty bittys baby plush stacking toy by Hallmark. The Consumer Product Safety Commission issued a recall on the product on Aug. 31 because of the small fabric hats and bows that were detachable and posed a choking hazard. But WATCH said they purchased the toy online after the recall was announced.

2.     Pull Along Pony by Tolo Toys Limited. WATCH said the product violates a federal law that requires that strings on playpen and crib toys be less than 12 inches long. The Tolo toy’s cord is 19 inches long. But the Toy Association said pull-along toys are an exception to this rule because the purpose is to teach motor skills.

3.     Wonder Woman Battle-Action Sword by Mattel. The nonprofit warns consumers that the stiff plastic sword can cause facial damage or other injuries to children.

4.     Hand Fidgetz Spinners by Kipp Brothers. Fidget spinners are meant for antsy kids, but WATCH said many come with small parts that can easily become loose or pulled off.

5.     Spider-Man Spider-Drone Official Movie Edition by Marvel and Skyrocket Toys. The drone comes with rapidly moving blades to help propel it into the air. The toy comes with a warning to keep moving parts away from fingers, hair, eyes and other body parts. WATCH said this is dangerous for children, which the drone is marketed toward.

6.     Nerf Zombie Strike Dreadbolt Crossbow by Hasbro and Nerf.com. The crossbow toy can cause eye and facial injuries. WATCH said the crossbow is inappropriate for small children.

7.     Slackers Slackline Classic Kit by Brand 44.This outdoor tightrope is marketed as an activity for all ages but comes with a warning of “severe injury,” including a chance for “strangulation hazard, especially with children.”

8.     The Oval Xylophone by Plan Toys Inc. and Plan Creations. The wooden instrument can be found online and is marketed to children as young as 12 months old. WATCH said that the toy does not come with a warning regarding the 9-and-a-half-inch-long stick, which could be placed in the child’s mouth and obstruct the child’s airway.

9.     Jetts Heel Wheels by Razor USA. The mini-roller skate-like devices are meant to be attached to the back of a child’s shoes to create the effect of a rear-wheel roller skate. The product comes with sparklers on the back that spark while moving. The manufacturer warns users to “keep sparks away from eyes, hair, exposed skin and clothing. Sparks can burn.”

10. Brianna Babydoll by Melissa & Doug. The dolls are marketed to children as young as 18 months, but have removable clothes and ponytail holders, which WATCH said could be a choking hazard.

Some parents may find the list helpful and others may think it’s nothing to get worked up about. The best advice seems to be to consider your child’s playing habits and age. Some kids are harder on toys than others. Infants and toddlers like to pull things apart and put things in their mouths – look for choking hazards. Inspect the toys with safety in mind and don’t assume that a well-known brand’s toys are always safe. Keep abreast of product safety recalls by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission at https://www.cpsc.gov

Story source: Kellie Ell, https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/retail/2017/11/14/10-worst-toys-of-2017-list/862445001/

 

 

Parenting

Recognizing the Signs of Self-Harming

2:30

It’s not a topic that any parent wants to think about - children that purposely hurt themselves. As disturbing as it is to contemplate the possibility that your child may be hurting his or herself intentionally, not paying attention to the signs could have far more distressing consequences.

A recent study from the UK found that the rise in self-harm reports increased nearly 70% among teen girls between 2011 and 2014. It’s not only the United Kingdom that is seeing an increase in teens that self-harm but U.S. researchers have seen the rising rates of self-harming teens, particularly among girls aged 10 to 14 years of age.

Neither of these studies looked at the causes, only the number of reported incidences. These increases do not include non-reported or self-treated self-injury.

Self-harm can take lots of physical forms, including cutting, burning, bruising, scratching, hair pulling, poisoning and overdosing.

When a child self-harms it is not always an attempted suicide or a plea for attention.  Instead, it’s often a way for young people to release overwhelming emotions. It’s a way of coping. So whatever the reason, it should be taken seriously. 

There are many reasons a child may hurt itself but sometimes even the child may not know the underlying reason why they do what they do.

There are links between depression and self-harm.  Quite often a child or young person who is self-harming is being bullied, under too much pressure to do well at school, being emotionally abused, grieving or having relationship problems with family or friends.

The self-harm is often tied to emotions such as:

·      Low self-esteem and low confidence

·      Loneliness

·      Sadness

·      Anger

·      Numbness

·      Lack of control over their lives

Most people want to avoid pain, so the idea of purposely causing emotional or bodily pain is confusing. Often, the physical pain for a child that self-harms is easier to deal with than the emotional pain they are living with. In a way, it gives them control over at least one part of their life.

There are signs that parents can be aware of when a child is physically harming their self. These are commonly found on the head, arms, thighs and chest and may include:

·      Cuts

·      Scratches

·      Bruises

·      Burns

·      Bald patches from pulling out hair

There are also emotional signs of self-harm. These are more difficult to spot and don’t always mean that a young person is self-harming. However, if you notice these signs in your child, they should be taken seriously, particularly if accompanied by the physical signs:

·      Depression, tearfulness, low motivation

·      Withdrawn and isolated, for example, wanting to be alone in their bedroom for long periods of time

·      Low self-esteem and self-blame

·      Unusual eating habits; increased weight loss or gain

·      Drinking or taking drugs

There are things you can do to help your child, but sometimes it is necessary or to reach out for professional help.

Whatever your relationship to a child, discovering they’re self-harming will inevitably have a big emotional effect on you. But however it makes you feel, it's very important that you stay calm and let them know that you're there to help and support them.

You can’t always figure out what is bothering them. It’s important that you know that – you can’t fix everything. Whatever emotional state you are in, never give the impression that their self-harming has created a big problem for you.

It’s also important to remember that the severity of the injuries doesn’t reflect the young person’s suffering. Something has caused them to self-harm – so it’s always helpful to be sensitive. Saying things such as “the injuries aren’t that bad” or “what have you done to yourself?” could make things worse.

Sometimes your child will talk to you about why they are hurting themselves and sometimes they find it embarrassing or too difficult.  You might suggest they write you an email or letter so they can express their ideas more clearly without interruption.

Your instinct might be to constantly keep your eye on your child, and that's understandable. But by giving them their own space you'll help build up their confidence and trust. Try to find a balance between monitoring what they're doing and respecting their privacy.

It is important to make sure that if they’re harming themselves that they are cleaning and caring for any injuries effectively.

Strangely, when a person self-harms, chemicals are released into the brain which can become addictive very quickly. They may find that they want to change the behavior, but can’t. Professional counseling may help them find solutions.

The number of children and teens that self-harm is on the rise. Some experts believe that high social media use, cyber and in-school bullying as well as uncertain economic times may be contributors.

You may think that there is no way your child would self-harm, but don’t take it for granted. Look for the signs and address the issue if you feel there’s a chance. You shouldn’t accuse your child of self-harm, but you can always open a dialogue by asking them if they know anyone that self-harms or what they think about it.

Story source : https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/keeping-children-safe/self-harm/

Parenting

Recall: 587,000 Preferred Kids Wind-Up Musical Toys

1:30

More than 500,000 wind-up musical toys are being recalled because of a choking hazard. The stuffed animals come in a variety of animal characters and colors.

The recalled Preferred Kids Wind-Up Musical Toys have a metal post and /or handle that can detach and get stuck in a child’s throat if they put the part in their mouth.

The firm has received six reports of parts from the wind-up handle detaching from the toy. No injuries have been reported so far.

Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled toys, take them away from young children and contact Kids Preferred for a free replacement toy.

The toys were sold at Carter’s, Target, Walmart and other stores nationwide and online from January 2016 through August 2017 for between $11 and $20.

Consumers can contact Kids Preferred toll-free at 888-968-9268 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, email at recall@kidspreferred.com or online at www.kidspreferred.com and click on “Product Safety” for more information.

The model number and batch code are printed on the smallest white sewn-in label behind the care label.

A list of model numbers and batch codes as well as photos and descriptions of the recalled toys can be found at https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2017/kids-preferred-recalls-wind-up-musical-toys

Parenting

Happy Halloween!

2:00

It’s that time of year as goblins, ghouls, super-heroes, pirates and princesses make their way through neighborhoods with outstretched hands and shy giggles.  Yep, Halloween is here!

While little ones concentrate on having fun, parents can help make this traditional holiday safer.

Candy check:

·      Children shouldn’t snack on treats from their goody bags while they’re out trick-or-treating. Give them a light meal or snack before they head out – don’t send them out on an empty stomach. Urge them to wait until they get home and let you inspect their loot before they eat any of it.

·      Tell children not to accept – and especially not to eat – anything that isn’t commercially wrapped. Inspect commercially wrapped treats for signs of tampering, such as an unusual appearance or discoloration, tiny pinholes, or tears in wrappers. Throw away anything that looks suspicious.

·      If your child has a food allergy, check the label to ensure the allergen isn’t present. Do not allow the child to eat any home-baked goods he or she may have received.

·      If you have very young children, be sure to remove any choking hazards such as gum, peanuts, hard candies, or small toys.

Preventing fires and burns:

·      Select flame retardant materials when buying or making costumes.

·      Choose battery-operated candles and lights instead of open-flame candles.

Good visibility:

·      Make sure your child can see clearly where they are going and can be seen.

·      Trim costumes or clothing with reflective tape. Many costumes are dark in color and can’t easily be seen by car drivers.

·      Give your child a small flashlight or glow stick to carry with them if they are trick- or- treating after dusk.

Pumpkin Carving: Carving pumpkins is traditional in many families and while the results can be stunning, great care needs to be taken when children are involved. 

·      Small children should never carve pumpkins. Children can draw a face with markers. Then parents can do the cutting.

·      Consider using a flashlight or glow stick instead of a candle to light your pumpkin. If you do use a candle, a votive candle is safest.

·      Candlelit pumpkins should be placed on a sturdy table, away from curtains and other flammable objects, and should never be left unattended.

Costumes: Store bought costumes rarely fit properly, so you may need to make some adjustments.

·      Adjust costumes to ensure a good fit. Long skirts or capes can drag on the ground and cause falls.

·      Secure hats, scarves and masks to ensure that your child can see everything that is going on around them. Also, check to see that nothing is keeping your child from breathing properly. Masks and some super-hero helmets can fir too tightly, making it hard to breathe.

·      Make sure that swords, canes or sticks are not sharp.

Home safety:

·      To keep homes safe for visiting trick-or-treaters, parents should remove from the porch and front yard anything a child could trip over such as garden hoses, toys, bikes and lawn decorations.

·      Parents should check outdoor lights and replace burned-out bulbs.

·      Wet leaves or snow should be swept from sidewalks and steps.

·      Restrain pets so they do not inadvertently jump on or bite a trick-or-treater.

An adult should always accompany young children. When your child is about ten, they may start asking to go with their friends. There are some questions to think about before you decide to let them go out on their own:

·      What is your child’s maturity level? Do they normally act pretty responsible and make good choices?

·      Who are the friends they want to go with and what is their maturity level?

·      What area are they going to be trick-or-treating in?  Will it be local or in an area your child may not be familiar with?

·      What time to they plan to start and be back home? Give your child a definite time.

Colored contacts have become popular with some older children. Often the packets these contacts come in have advertising on the package claiming that, “One size fits all.” They don’t.  These lenses are illegal in some states, but can be found online. They may cause pain, inflammation, and serious eye infections. Avoid these at all costs.

Whether your child is with you - or out with friends - make sure someone has a charged cell phone with them.  You want be prepared in case of an emergency.

Halloween has changed over the years and lots of parents now take their children to specific places that host Halloween parties and activities, but whether it’s in a controlled environment or out on the streets, it’s still smart to keep safety first.

Sources: https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/news-features-and-safety-tips/pages/Halloween-Safety-Tips.aspx

 Dr. Karen Sherman, http://www.hitchedmag.com/article.php?id=365

https://www.fda.gov/food/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm187021.htm

 

 

 

Parenting

Benefits to Being an Older Parent

2:30

Older moms and dads are having a “baby boom” all their own. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, the number of first time moms, aged 35 and older, is nine times higher than in the 1070s. Men over the age of 40 now account for about 9 percent of all U.S. births and those over the age of 50, nearly 1 percent.

Research on the health risks for pregnancies associated with women of “advanced maternal age” are well documented. Recent studies have also looked at “advanced paternal age” and related mutations in sperm that may present health risks to offspring.

However, all these studies and known facts haven’t deterred mature men and women from having children. When the child is healthy, new research suggests that older parents may have quite a bit to offer their little one.

If you’re an older dad, odds are that your kid will be “geekier,“ or smarter than the average child his or her age. A study published in Translational Psychiatry, found that kids born to older dads are more likely to have a high IQ, and a stronger ability to focus on their interests. Also, they aren’t as distracted by a desire to fit in socially, and are thus more likely to achieve what they called “educational success,” which leads to a stronger socioeconomic status.

Another study points out that being a more mature parent may also mean that mom and dad are more emotionally prepared to take on the responsibilities of parenthood. Parents of both genders tended to have more career success, better financial security and stronger relationships with their partners than their younger counterparts.

Patience also seems to be an advantage offered by older parents. A 2016 Danish study found that older mothers were more adept at setting boundaries with their kids, and were less likely to yell at and harshly punish them, leading to fewer behavioral, social and emotional difficulties down the road.

Financial stability shows up in several studies as a contributor to a more stable childhood for kids of more mature parents. Younger parents are often still struggling with attaining economic and educational growth, while older parents may have more time to spend with their child because many of those challenges have been met.

Another interesting benefit for older moms came out in a 2016 University of Southern California study; being an older mom can work in your favor when it comes to your mental state later in life. After examining a group of over 800 women between the ages of 41 and 92, researchers discovered the women who had their last baby after 35 had better cognition and verbal memory later in life than those who first became parents young. They also found that women who used contraceptives for more than 10 years, or got their first periods before the age of 13, fared better when it came to problem-solving and executive functioning when they aged.

While there may be benefits for kids of older parents, there can also be unique challenges. Some children feel their parents are “different” from other kids’ parents. They may look different, act different and have different priorities. As children get older, they may become more aware of their parents age and worry about losing a parent earlier than their friends might. Children of older parents may also be faced with caring for their aging parents, if health problems arise, sooner their younger parent counterparts.

Parenting takes a lot of energy. It also requires adaptation. Younger parents may have an advantage in the energy category, but older parents may be able to go-with-the-flow a little easier.

All in all, more people are waiting longer to have children for all kinds of reasons. Noticing the amount of studies looking into this trend, older parenting may give scientists a whole new field to discover.

Story sources: Vivian Manning-Schaffel, https://www.nbcnews.com/better/health/5-advantages-being-older-parent-ncna775581

Parenting

Cradle and Bassinet Safety Tips

1:45

Cradles and bassinets can be convenient for parents and comfortable for babies. You can move them easily from room to room, letting you keep an eye on baby during the day. At night, you can keep your baby in your own bedroom during the first few weeks of life as you and baby adjust to a new sleeping schedule.

In recent years, cradles and bassinets have gained new features: You can buy ones that vibrate, are on wheels, swivel from side to side, or nestle next to your bed for co-sleeping without bed-sharing. They’re also great for trips to see the grandparents.

While they are handy, cradles and bassinets are not substitutes for a crib. Babies outgrow them, so you’ll need a crib sooner or later, but they can be useful.

Just like cribs, there are important safety tips to be aware of when using cradles and bassinets:

  • Avoid bassinets and cradles with a motion or rocking feature, as these have caused suffocation when babies rolled against the edge. If you use an heirloom-rocking cradle, supervise your infant while in use.
  • As with a crib, a bassinet, cradle, sleeper or play yard should have a firm mattress that fits snugly without any space around the edges so a baby’s head can’t get wedged in and lead to suffocation. The American Academy of Pediatrics has not yet weighed in on the safety of these products; some pediatricians have warned parents that they are not safe for overnight sleeping. Parents should err on the side of caution and use only products that comply with safe-sleep recommendations.
  • If you have pets or other young children in the house – for instance, a dog who might knock over a bassinet, a cat who might climb in, or a toddler who might try to lift your baby from a bassinet – stick with a crib.
  • Moses baskets - a woven basket with handles - are often lined with puffy fabric, which raises a baby's risk for suffocation or sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and are best avoided.

Bassinets and cradles are designed for babies under 5 months old, and who cannot push up on hands and knees.

These temporary products can be helpful for keeping an eye on your baby while they are napping, if you need to move from room to room or stay overnight in another home. Parents and caregivers need to make sure any cradle or bassinet used meets current CPSIA safety standards.

Story sources: https://www.babycenter.com/bassinets-baskets

 

Parenting

Cashews Recalled Due to Glass Pieces

1:30

Nuts have become a go-to snack for many families looking to live a healthier life. If you’ve purchased cashews from an ALDI grocery store recently, be sure to check and see if the brand is Southern Grove Cashew Halves and Pieces with Sea Salt.

The recall was initiated after the company received consumer reports of glass found in the product. To date, there have not been any reported injuries. Potentially impacted product has been removed from store shelves.

This recall affects the Southern Grove Cashew Halves and Pieces with Sea Salt sold in 8-ounce (227-gram) canisters, labeled with UPC No. 041498179366. The affected cashews have best by dates of 11/27/18 and 11/28/18.

The cashews were sold by ALDI stores in 29 states: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, D.C., West Virginia, and Wisconsin.

Consumers who have purchased the product in question are urged not to consume this product and may return the product to their local ALDI store for a refund or dispose of the item.

Consumers with questions may contact Star Snacks at 201-882-4593 or RecallFEQ01@gmail.com, Monday-Friday 9 am – 2 pm EST.

Story source: https://www.fda.gov/Safety/Recalls/ucm562129.htm

Parenting

Helping Kids Cope With Tragic Events

2:00

Another all too common tragedy has saddened the hearts of Americans this week. Just 35 days after a man opened fire on a crowd of concertgoers in Las Vegas, killing 58 people and wounding nearly 500 others, another mass killing has taken place. This time in the small community of Sutherland Springs, Texas, leaving 26 people dead and 10 critically injured.  About half of the victims were children, according to news reports. This follows a terrorist attack in New York City on Halloween that killed 8 people. The heartbreak and numbers are gut wrenching to think about.

These kinds of horrific events can make the world seem like a terrifying place, particularly for kids.

How can you help your child cope with such frightening news? As a parent or a caregiver, how you react can have a strong impact on how your child views his or her own safety.

Dr. Jennifer Caudle, an associate professor at Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford, suggests that parents shield their children from news reports.

"Children may become upset by news coverage," Caudle said. So monitor and limit what they see, hear or read. This may reduce their anxiety and help them deal with these unsettling events, she explained.

Other suggestions include:

  • Ask your child what they have already heard about the event. 
  • Provide the facts but try not to make judgments about the situation. 
  • Avoid upsetting details, and reassure children that people are working hard to make things better for everyone. 
  • Don't pressure kids to talk about the events, but encourage them to share their feelings by talking, drawing or writing. 
  • Let children know they can come to you for information and that they are free to ask questions. 
  • Remind children that their home is a safe place. 
  • Let children know that people may react differently to hard-to-understand events.

If your child or adolescent seems to be obsessing over the events and is having a hard time putting things in perspective, they may need professional help. 

"Problems with sleeping, changes in appetite or behavior, mood changes and new physical complaints, such as stomach aches and headaches, could -- in some children -- be a sign that they are having a difficult time coping," she said. "If this is the case, make sure your child sees a health care professional."

The National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) says that it is important to let your child know that you will do your best to take care of him or her, that you love them and it’s okay for them to feel upset or sad.

NIMH also offers these tips:

  • If your child is having trouble sleeping give them extra attention, let them sleep with a light on, or let them sleep in your room (for a short time).
  • Try to keep normal routines, for example, reading bedtime stories, eating dinner together, watching TV together, reading books, exercising, or playing games.

Unfortunately, these types of tragedies don’t appear to being going away anytime soon. But, you can help your child (and yourself) by reminding them that although there are some people that might want to inflict harm on others, most people are loving and kind. They want a safe place for children to grow up in and they are doing their best to make this world a better place.

Story sources: Mary Elizabeth Dallas, https://consumer.healthday.com/mental-health-information-25/child-psychology-news-125/helping-children-cope-when-a-mass-tragedy-strikes-728263.html

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/helping-children-and-adolescents-cope-with-violence-and-disasters-parents/index.shtml

Parenting

Kidde Recalls 37 Million Fire Extinguishers!

2:30

Many families have a fire extinguisher in the home or car in case of a fire. These can be life and property savers – if they work properly. If you own a Kidde fire extinguisher, then be sure to check and see whether it is one of the 134 models being recalled due to failure to discharge.

The recall is for Kidde fire extinguishers with plastic handles. The fire extinguishers can become clogged or require excessive force to discharge and can fail to activate during a fire emergency. In addition, the nozzle can detach with enough force to pose an impact hazard.

This recall involves two styles of Kidde fire extinguishers: plastic handle fire extinguishers and push-button Pindicator fire extinguishers.

The plastic handle fire extinguishers encompasses 134 models of Kidde fire extinguishers manufactured between January 1, 1973 and August 15, 2017, including models that were previously recalled in March 2009 and February 2015. The extinguishers were sold in red, white and silver, and are either ABC- or BC-rated. The model number is printed on the fire extinguisher label. For units produced in 2007 and beyond, the date of manufacture is a 10-digit date code printed on the side of the cylinder, near the bottom.  Digits five through nine represent the day and year of manufacture in DDDYY format. Date codes for recalled models manufactured from January 2, 2012 through August 15, 2017 are 00212 through 22717.  For units produced before 2007, a date code is not printed on the fire extinguisher.

Push-button Pindicator fire extinguishers: The recall involves eight models of Kidde Pindicator fire extinguishers manufactured between August 11, 1995 and September 22, 2017. The no-gauge push-button extinguishers were sold in red and white, and with a red or black nozzle. These models were sold primarily for kitchen and personal watercraft applications.

Consumers should immediately contact Kidde to request a free replacement fire extinguisher and for instructions on returning the recalled unit, as it may not work properly in a fire emergency.

The firm is aware of a 2014 death involving a car fire following a crash. Emergency responders could not get the recalled Kidde fire extinguishers to work. There have been approximately 391 reports of failed or limited activation or nozzle detachment, including the fatality, approximately 16 injuries, including smoke inhalation and minor burns, and approximately 91 reports of property damage.

The products were sold at Menards, Montgomery Ward, Sears, The Home Depot, Walmart and other department, home and hardware stores nationwide, and online at Amazon.com, ShopKidde.com and other online retailers for between $12 and $50 and for about $200 for model XL 5MR. These fire extinguishers were also sold with commercial trucks, recreational vehicles, personal watercraft and boats.

Consumers can contact Kidde toll-free at 855-271-0773 from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. ET Saturday and Sunday, or online at www.kidde.com and click on “Product Safety Recall” for more information.

A complete list of the recalled products is available on https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2018/Kidde-Recalls-Fire-Extinguishers-with-Plastic%20Handles-Due-to-Failure-to-Discharge-and-Nozzle-Detachment-One-Death-Reported

 

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