Daily Dose

College & Alcohol: A Dangerous Mix

1:30 to read

I have been reading and watching news reports surrounding the University of Virginia article in Rolling Stone and the recent trial of several Vanderbilt University football players charged with rape. I guess it has weighed heavily on my mind as I have had three sons in a fraternity at a large state school, as well as taking care of more than several young women (patients) who have said they were sexually abused while away at college.

To begin with, and I have said this before, my husband and I began talking to our sons, at rather young ages, about how you “treat” girls. This began with explaining to them that there is a “difference between boys and girls”, and I say this as a woman, wife , mother, physician, and now grandmother to a little girl.  

So...we taught our sons that when a girl says “NO” it always means “NO”, no matter the circumstance.  This conversation became even more direct as they got older and started dating.  Now that they are adults, I can only hope and assume that they listened!

I believe in gender equality, but i do think there is a difference between boys/girls, young men/young women and that difference comes when both genders begin drinking alcohol and getting drunk.  My patients will tell you that I discuss this with each of them as they leave for college. While boys get drunk and do some very scary, inappropriate and dangerous things...they do no get raped by a drunk girl. 

In all of the girls I have taken care of, and also in the case of so many other college women in the news, there was excessive alcohol when a sexual assault took place.  Binge drinking on college campuses is one the the biggest problems being tackled by many universities across the country.  But sexual assault and abuse is another university problem that continues to exist.

Back to differences....a girl/young woman who is drunk cannot protect herself, often cannot recall “he said/she said” and sometimes awakens from a drunken stupor without her clothes on. It distresses me to write this. Whether it was consensual, or rape...it is often unclear when the girl was drunk.

Talk to your sons and daughters about this epidemic.  I tell my female patients, and I will tell my grand daughter one day "it is your body and the only way to protect yourself is to be of clear mind...if you drink you need to be able to take care of yourself and always be aware of what is happening". It cannot be a “blurry” memory.

Daily Dose

Kids Who Snore

1.30 to read

Does your child snore?  If so, have you discussed their snoring with your pediatrician.  A recent study published in Pediatrics supported the routine screening and tracking of snoring among preschoolers.  Pediatricians should routinely be inquiring about your child’s sleep habits, as well as any snoring that occurs on a regular basis, during your child’s routine visits.  

Snoring may be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea and/or sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and habitual snoring has been associated with both learning and behavioral problems in older children. But this study was the first to look at preschool children between the ages of 2-3 years.

The study looked at 249 children from birth until 3 years of age, and parents were asked report how often their child snored on a weekly basis at both 2 and 3 years of age.  Persistent snorers were defined as those children who snored more than 2x/week at both ages 2 and 3.  Persistent loud snoring occurred in 9% of the children who were studied.

The study then looked at behavior and as had been expected persistent snorers had significantly worse overall behavioral scores.  This was noted as hyperactivity, depression and attentional difficulties.  Motor development did not seem to be impacted by snoring.

So, intermittent snoring is  common in the 2 to 3 year old set and does not seem to be associated with any long term behavioral issues. It is quite common for a young child to snore during an upper respiratory illness as well .  But persistent snoring needs to be evaluated and may need to be treated with the removal of a child’s adenoids and tonsils.

If you are worried about snoring, talk to your doctor. More studies are being done on this subject as well, so stay tuned.

Daily Dose

Ear Infections Can Develop Quickly

1:15 to read

One of the things that I sometimes see in my practice, which is interesting to me as a pediatrician, and was equally interesting when I had young kids, is how quickly a child's ear exam can change.

You are taught that in medical school, but when you really see it happen it with your patients or your own child you become a real believer. As the saying goes, seeing is believing. I can remember checking one of my boy's ears for an ear infection early in the morning before heading out to work, and declaring, "his ears are perfectly clear". How could it be, my husband would inquire, "that they seem worse after we have been at work all day" and lo and behold, I would re-check their ears and a normal morning ear is an abnormal evening ear. What a difference 12 hours can make! Not a very good warranty on ears and infections.

I was reminded of this yesterday when a patient called and said that her little boy had developed "disgusting" eye drainage which was worsening since I had seen them in the office a few days ago. They had just returned from taking both of their young children to Disney World, and she "couldn't believe they came home sick!" That's a whole 'nother column. At any rate, seeing that they lived fairly close I told them to swing on by and let me look at him again. I think she was just hoping I would call in eye drops. The two precious boys arrived at my doorstep on Saturday night and lo and behold after looking in the youngest child's ears, both of his ears were so infected. So, once again I was a believer in ears changing, and he did not need eye drops he needed to have oral antibiotics to clear up his ears (and subsequently his eyes). There are several lessons from all of this. Ears can change quickly, eye drainage in a toddler with a cold may often really indicate that their ears are infected, and house calls are a good thing.

That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow.

Daily Dose

The Difference Between Cradle Cap And Dandruff

1.15 to read

I recently received a question from a Twitter follower related to cradle cap and dandruff. She wanted to know if there was a difference in the two.

You know there really isn’t as they are both due to seborrheic dermatitis, an inflammatory condition of the skin in which the skin overproduces skin cells and sebum (the skins natural oil). Cradle cap is the term used for the scaly dermatitis seen on the scalp in infants. It is also seen on the eyelids, eyebrows, and behind the ears. It is typically seen after about three months of age and will often resolve on its own by the time a baby is eight to 12 months old. It is usually simply a “cosmetic” problem for a baby as it looks like a yellowish plaque on a baby’s scalp and is often not even noticed by anyone other than the parents. Unlike seborrheic dermatitis in adults, cradle cap typically doesn’t itch. It is thought that cradle cap may occur in infancy due to hormonal influences from the mother that were passed across the placenta to the baby. These hormones cause the sebaceous glands to become over active. In some severe cases an infant’s scalp becomes really scaly and inflamed and causes even more parental concern, as it appears that the infant is uncomfortable and may be trying to scratch their head by rubbing it on surfaces. The treatment for cradle cap is to wash the baby’s scalp daily with a mild shampoo and then to use a soft comb or brush to help remove the scales once they have been loosened with washing. When washing the head make sure to get the shampoo behind the ears and in the brows (keeping the soap out of baby’s eyes). This is usually sufficient treatment for most cradle cap. In situations where the greasy scales seem to be worsening it may help to put a small amount of mineral oil or olive oil on the baby’s head and let it sit (I left a small amount on my children’s heads overnight) and then to shampoo the following day. The oil will help the scales to loosen up and come off more easily. For babies that have very inflamed irritated cradle cap a visit to your pediatrician may be warranted to confirm the diagnosis. In persistent cases I often recommend shampooing several times a week with a dandruff shampoo that has either selenium (Selsun) or zinc pyrithione (Head and Shoulders) making sure not to get any in the infant’s eyes. I may then also use a hydrocortisone cream or foam on the scalp that will lessen the inflammation and itching. In these cases it may take several weeks to totally clear up the problem. As children get older, especially during puberty, you may see a return of seborrhea as dandruff. Again you can use dandruff shampoos. It also seems that with the overproduction of sebum there is an overgrowth of a fungus called “malessizia” so using a shampoo for dandruff as well as a antifungal shampoo (Nizoral) often works. I have teens alternate different shampoos, as sometimes it seems to work better than always using the same shampoo for months on end. Teens don’t like white flakes falling from their scalp and unlike a baby, a teen is worried about the cosmetic issues of seborrhea! That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

A Baby Girl!

1.15 to read

Did you hear my big news?? I am officially a grandmother of a new “premature” but healthy baby girl!!! Yes a GIRL!!  After raising three sons I really thought I had mistaken the text announcing a baby girl.   As you probably know, all important information is now received via a text.....so as all four first time grandparents sat in the labor and delivery waiting room one of us got the text that read.....healthy but tiny baby girl...all good!! 

Now, if you have ever sat with a group of friends where everyone is awaiting the same information via text you know that despite the sender pushing send at the same time...the text may arrive on one person’s phone before another, even when sitting right next to each other. That was the case in the waiting room.....we all had phones, but one grandparent got the text first and read it and we all went, REALLY, for real a girl?? 

Despite the fact that our sweet grand daughter wanted to arrive 5 weeks early, she weighed in at 4’12” and only had to spend 8 days in the hospital.  She must have known how excited we all were and we wanted to be able to hold her sooner than later.  

After 2 nights in the neonatal ICU, where she had wonderful care and reassuring doctors and nurses, she was moved to the Special Care Nursery where we were allowed to hold her and feed her and gaze upon her in wonder.   Just think four doting grandparents who all wanted to hold her....we should have had quadruplets.  

After a few days of “feeding and growing”  she was discharged and I am happy to report she is now a whopping 5 lbs of pure joy. She is home with her parents and thriving.    

What a gift to watch your own children begin their parenting journey. I am doing the best I can to “keep quiet” and just enjoy being a grandmother...sometimes not easy but trying. Parenting never ends....especially when you are a mom. I can’t wait to take a grand daughter shopping, put bows in her hair and have tea parties, and all of the things my boys just didn’t want to do. We are tickled PINK!!!

Daily Dose

Your Child's Sitter

1:30 to read

Do you ever leave your child with a babysitter or caregiver? Weird question right? But some parents never want to leave their child with someone else....and I am not sure that is healthy for either parent or child.   

I recently had this discussion with parents of a 3 year old child who was having a terrible time with separation anxiety. While many children go through stages of separation anxiety, by the time a child is 3-4 years they are typically past this stage. When I was talking with this family they told me their child had never been left with anyone.  

I guess as a working mother I was incredulous. What? Had the parents never gone out to dinner or to a party, a concert, lecture  or even on a night away for some much needed “couple” time?  They told me that they would occasionally call in grandparents but typically took their child everywhere with them.  (I think there are many places such as movies, adult restaurants, and other venues that might not want the 2 year old in tow).   I suppose some would say the child was fortunate, but I really believe that as a child reaches age 2ish they need to begin learning to separate from their parent. Not for days or weeks, but for either a play group, a pre school program, the gym nursery or something where the child is learning a bit of independence.   

While some parents are quite fortunate that they don’t have to leave their child to go to work every day, the concept of leaving your child for any hour or two with a trusted babysitter should not cause anxiety for the parent and ultimately not the child. Separation is an important milestone, as your child learns that while you may leave for an hour or two, you always return. There is security in that knowledge. They will also learn how to interact with  other adults and children, which is often different than they do with their own parents.  (Ask any teacher about that phenomena). 

Autonomy and independence are typically traits that parents desire for their children.  Parents also need to have some autonomy as well.....I think this makes for a better parent child relationship in the long run.  Little steps in separating become bigger steps as a child grows older....starting with a babysitter or nursery for an hour or two on occasion is often the beginning. 

Daily Dose

Antibiotics May Boost Risk for Recurrent Ear Infection

1.15 to read

Did you know that repeated use of antibiotics to treat acute ear infections in young children increases the risk of recurrent ear infections by 20 percent? Researchers in the Netherlands found that 63 percent of children given the antibiotic amoxicillin had another ear infection within three years, compared with 43 percent of children given a placebo at the time of their initial infection. The results of the study are published online in the July edition of BMJ. Researchers looked at 168 children, aged six months to two years. In the group given amoxicillin, 47 out of 75 children had at least one recurrent ear infection, compared with 37 of 86 children in the placebo group. That equated to a 2.5 times higher risk of recurrent ear infection for the amoxicillin group. However, the study also found that 30 percent of children in the placebo group had ear, nose and throat surgery after their initial infection, compared with 21 percent in the amoxicillin group. The higher recurrence rate among children who took amoxicillin could be due to a weakening of their body's natural immune response as a result of taking an antibiotic at the initial stage of infection, the researchers said. Antibiotic use in such cases may cause an "unfavorable shift" toward the growth of resistant bacteria. Antibiotics may reduce the length and severity of the initial ear infection, but may also result in a higher number of recurrent infections and antibiotic resistance, the researchers stated. Because of this, they said, doctors need to be careful in their use of antibiotics in children with ear infections.

Daily Dose

Do Germs Make You Cringe?

1:30 to read

I see a lot of parents who are “germaphobic” and are constantly sanitizing anything and everything that may come into contact with their baby. I am not just talking about a newborn...but rather older infants and young children, especially as they start to creep and crawl around their environment.  Their mother’s purses have a bottle of hand sanitizer in easy reach and many have the bottle attached to the diaper bag or stroller as well. 

But now comes a new study which may help everyone relax a bit...and maybe stop constant disinfecting as well.  A recent study in The Journal of Allergy and Immunology found that children, under the age of 1, who shared a “dirty” home, with mouse and cat dander as well as cockroach droppings (I know you are all cringing now)  were less likely to develop allergies or wheezing by age 3.  

This idea has been called the “hygiene hypothesis”.  In other words, having children who are growing up in relatively sterile environments, may lead the immune system to “compensate” by reacting to pollen, dust and dander when there are fewer germs to ward off!  Now this doesn’t mean you have to stop keeping your house clean and never making a bed or vacuuming again ( novel idea), but the constant scrubbing and sanitizing may be a bit much. You don’t need anti bacterial soap in every room!

There have been other interesting studies done among children who live on farms.  They were taken into the barn as infants with hay, dander and animals all around them. They too were found to have fewer allergies than urban children.  So...playing on the dirty barn floor might not only be necessary for farm children, but also protective.

Should you run out and buy mice, a cat and try to breed roaches? I don’t think that is the recommendation.  Interestingly, this study did not show that having a dog was protective ....hmmmm when my kids were younger we did have a cat as well as a dog, not by choice but by my middle son’s insistence. Having always had dogs, somewhere in his early child hood years he “bargained” with us to adopt a black kitten that we all grew to love.  Maybe that was the best decision we made.  Fortunately none of my children have allergies or asthma. 

Lots of interesting studies on the horizon relating to this topic....stay tuned as I will keep you posted!

Daily Dose

Do Essential Oils Boost Immune System?

1:30 to read

Although it is still hot and officially summer, soon everyone will be heading back to school  and coughs and colds (and eventually flu, another topic) will be just around the corner. I had a patient ask me about the use of essential oils. Her 2 1/2 year old daughter is heading to preschool for the first time and she “had heard from her friends that essential oils help a child’s immunity during cold season”.

Unfortunately, there is very little data at all to confirm that statement. I only wish that rubbing a bit of lavender oil on would help prevent the common cold. While it may smell great and be relaxing....there is no data that I can find to show that there is any reproducible science to the claims that essential oils boost the immune system.  

While I was researching I found many sites stating that “eucalyptus oil is an anti-viral” and “peppermint oil is an anti-pyretic (fever reducer)”.  Tea tree oil is touted as being “both anti -bacterial and anti-fungal” (I don’t know of other drugs that can claim both!).  But, I just don’t see any data to support all of this. 

The word essential refers to the essence of the plant the oil is derived from, rather than being “essential” to your health. While in most cases essential oils (which are highly concentrated) used as aromatherapy are not harmful for adults, it may be a different story in children, especially those under the age of 6. While labels may say  “natural” it may not always mean safe.  Many oils are poisonous if ingested and there have been reports of accidental overdoses in children with several different oils. In one report tea tree oil and lavender oil applied topically have been shown to cause breast enlargement in boys.  Oil of eucalyptus and peppermint are high in menthol and cineole.  These substances may cause children to become drowsy have decreased respirations.  While there are articles stating that the use of menthol (Vicks) on a child’s feet may be helpful during a cold for reducing a cough, do not use this if child is young enough to put their feet in their mouths. 

I must say that I sometime use a few drops of eucalyptus oil in the shower when I have a cold as I think it smells great and seems to help “open up” my head. Whether this is in “my mind” or a response from my olfactory centers which sends calming messages to respiratory center is not clear. But, I am not ingesting it or using it topically. 

 

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