Daily Dose

Treating Bee Stings

Bee stings are a right of passage during childhood, always memorable, but never fun.I was outside today and noticed that the bees are back, pollinating the flowers in my garden, but ready to sting too if they are crossed by bare feet or errant hands. Bee stings are a right of passage during childhood, always memorable, but never fun. Our office receives numerous calls about how to handle a bee sting. First thing is to get some ice or a cool compress on the sting, which relives both PAIN and swelling.

While the ice is working you can take a peek and see if the stinger is still in the skin, and if so do not go grab tweezers or your fingernails to try and remove the stinger. If you do that you will only make the sting worse. The best way to remove the stinger is by using the edge of a credit card to gently scrape the stinger out of the skin. Honey Bees leave behind their stinger while wasps and hornets do not. Unless the child is allergic to bee stings most people will only have a local reaction. If there are any symptoms associated with the sting such as swelling of face, mouth, lips, or difficulty swallowing or breathing, give an immediate dose of Benadryl (diphenhydramine) while calling 911. If the child has a known bee hypersensitivity and they have an epi pen you will need to use it and also call 911. For local reactions after the sting is cleaned you can apply calamine lotion or a topical steroid cream. For swelling and discomfort a dose of Benadryl is also recommended, as well as a pain reliever like ibuprofen which will also relieve local inflammation along with pain relief. The sting is usually not uncomfortable for more than 24 hours. Make sure to watch for signs of infection with increasing redness, streaking or pain at the site of the sting. If the area seems to be getting worse rather than better it is a good idea to let you pediatrician take a peek. That's your daily dose for today, we'll chat again tomorrow.

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Daily Dose

The Teen Years

1:30 to read

Why is it that some teenagers are just “easy” while others may make parenting during those teen years difficult and stressful? Lately, I have seen a number of “easy” teens, you know the ones that are engaged, polite, make good grades, have chosen nice friends, and all-in-all are typically a joy to be around.

I really enjoy talking to my teenage patients and they often give me a lot of insight into topics I need to know about (emerging fads, new social media apps, the latest teen pranks etc.).  Many of them know about all of these things but at the same time manage to steer clear of the dangerous, crazy, or just plain stupid things that some of their classmates engage in.  

While these teens do not seem to be judgmental about others decisions, they also recognize that many of the decisions may have long lasting if not life threatening consequences.  Is it possible that their brains are “special” and they have somehow “fast-forwarded” and hardwired their immature, impulsive, risk-taking teen brains into young adult hood? I doubt that is the case.

One thing that seems to be the common theme for most of my “easy” teens has been a consistent and loving family. That does not necessarily mean that their parents are still married, or that there have not been some “bumps” along the way.  But these teens have know about limits and boundaries and stability since they were younger. They are respectful of their parents (although not always polite), and often tell me that their parents are “mean” or “always around”. I think “mean” also stands for parents that are engaged, present and put their children ahead of their own needs at times.....isn’t that what parenting is often about?

Another common theme is that these teens have family meals, have limits put on their use of electronics, have bedtimes and curfews.  They have had ongoing age appropriate conversations about the family’s morals and expectations since they were in elementary school ...consistency.

This may sound backwards, old fashioned or “throwback” but it seems that it still works for many families. I know that kids are all different, but EASY teens sure help keep parents less stressed and younger at heart!

Daily Dose

The Difference Between Cradle Cap And Dandruff

1.15 to read

I recently received a question from a Twitter follower related to cradle cap and dandruff. She wanted to know if there was a difference in the two.

You know there really isn’t as they are both due to seborrheic dermatitis, an inflammatory condition of the skin in which the skin overproduces skin cells and sebum (the skins natural oil). Cradle cap is the term used for the scaly dermatitis seen on the scalp in infants. It is also seen on the eyelids, eyebrows, and behind the ears. It is typically seen after about three months of age and will often resolve on its own by the time a baby is eight to 12 months old. It is usually simply a “cosmetic” problem for a baby as it looks like a yellowish plaque on a baby’s scalp and is often not even noticed by anyone other than the parents. Unlike seborrheic dermatitis in adults, cradle cap typically doesn’t itch. It is thought that cradle cap may occur in infancy due to hormonal influences from the mother that were passed across the placenta to the baby. These hormones cause the sebaceous glands to become over active. In some severe cases an infant’s scalp becomes really scaly and inflamed and causes even more parental concern, as it appears that the infant is uncomfortable and may be trying to scratch their head by rubbing it on surfaces. The treatment for cradle cap is to wash the baby’s scalp daily with a mild shampoo and then to use a soft comb or brush to help remove the scales once they have been loosened with washing. When washing the head make sure to get the shampoo behind the ears and in the brows (keeping the soap out of baby’s eyes). This is usually sufficient treatment for most cradle cap. In situations where the greasy scales seem to be worsening it may help to put a small amount of mineral oil or olive oil on the baby’s head and let it sit (I left a small amount on my children’s heads overnight) and then to shampoo the following day. The oil will help the scales to loosen up and come off more easily. For babies that have very inflamed irritated cradle cap a visit to your pediatrician may be warranted to confirm the diagnosis. In persistent cases I often recommend shampooing several times a week with a dandruff shampoo that has either selenium (Selsun) or zinc pyrithione (Head and Shoulders) making sure not to get any in the infant’s eyes. I may then also use a hydrocortisone cream or foam on the scalp that will lessen the inflammation and itching. In these cases it may take several weeks to totally clear up the problem. As children get older, especially during puberty, you may see a return of seborrhea as dandruff. Again you can use dandruff shampoos. It also seems that with the overproduction of sebum there is an overgrowth of a fungus called “malessizia” so using a shampoo for dandruff as well as a antifungal shampoo (Nizoral) often works. I have teens alternate different shampoos, as sometimes it seems to work better than always using the same shampoo for months on end. Teens don’t like white flakes falling from their scalp and unlike a baby, a teen is worried about the cosmetic issues of seborrhea! That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

Leaving Your Child Home Alone

At what age can you leave your child home alone?

I get asked this question a lot "At what age can I leave my child home alone?"  There is no simple answer but a progressibe one.

I tend to think most children are ready to spend 20-30 minutes alone at home between the ages of 10-11, but every child is different.  It depends on a number of things including how your child feels about being alone, the length of time, and if you and your child have discussed how to handle emergencies and getting a hold of you or a neighbor in case there is an emergency or even just a question that needs to be answered.  

Well, this topic brought up an interesting question, what do you do when you leave your child alone and there is not a home phone?  I have never even given that a thought as I am “old school” and still have that landline in my house. It just gives me a “good feeling” to know that it is there, even if it rarely rings. (although the kids know to call the home number as I typically turn off the cell as soon as I hit the door from work).   

More and more families have given up a home phone and I think this brings up so many different topics for discussion, but for starts how does your child call you when you leave them alone?  Or how do they call the trusty neighbor if they need something.  Do you get them a cell phone? Do you have to have an extra cell phone to have at home?  It seems to me that a home phone is important for just that reason. In case of an emergency, your child can pick up the phone and call for help, assistance or just a friendly voice. I don’t think they need a cell phone!  

Also, landlines are relatively inexpensive. Cell phones for 8,10, 11 year olds?  Sounds inappropriate and expensive.  Wouldn’t it be easier to keep a home phone so children can learn to answer a phone, use good phone manners, and when you are ready to let them stay at home by themselves for a few minutes, there is always a phone available. I don’t know, just seems easy solution to me.    

What do you think? I would love to hear from you!

 
Daily Dose

Head Flattening on the Rise!

1:30 to read

A recent study published in the online edition of Pediatrics confirms what I see in my practice. According to this study the  incidence of positional plagiocephaly (head flattening) has increased and is now estimated to occur in about 47% of babies between the ages of 7 and 12 weeks.  

The recommendation to have babies change from the tummy sleeping position to back sleeping was made in 1992. Since that time there has been a greater than a 50% decline in the incidence of SIDS. (see old posts).  But both doctors and parents have noticed that infants have sometimes developed flattened or misshapen heads from spending so much time being on their backs during those first few months of life.

This study was conducted in Canada among 440 healthy infants.  In 1999, Canada, like the U.S., began recommending  back sleeping for babies. Canadian doctors had also reported that they were seeing more plagiocephaly among infants.  

The authors found that 205 infants in the study had some form of plagiocephaly, with 78% being classsified as mild, 19% moderate and 3% severe.  Interestingly, there was a greater incidence (63%) of a baby having flattening on the right side of their heads.  

Flattening of the head, either on the back or sides is most often due to the fact that a baby is not getting enough “tummy time”.  Although ALL babies should sleep on their back, there are many opportunities throughout a day for a baby to be prone on a blanket while awake, or to spend time being snuggled upright over a parent’s shoulder or in their arms.  Limiting time spent in a car seat or a bouncy chair will also help prevent flattening.

Most importantly, I tell parents before discharging their baby from the hospital that tummy time needs to begin right away. It does seem that some babies have “in utero” positional preference for head turning and this needs to be addressed early on. Think of a baby being just like us, don’t you like to sleep on one side or another?  By rotating the direction the baby lies in the crib you can help promote head turning and prevent flattening.  

Lastly, most cases of plagiocephaly are reversible. Just put tummy time on your daily new parent  “to do list”.   

Daily Dose

A Baby Girl!

1.15 to read

Did you hear my big news?? I am officially a grandmother of a new “premature” but healthy baby girl!!! Yes a GIRL!!  After raising three sons I really thought I had mistaken the text announcing a baby girl.   As you probably know, all important information is now received via a text.....so as all four first time grandparents sat in the labor and delivery waiting room one of us got the text that read.....healthy but tiny baby girl...all good!! 

Now, if you have ever sat with a group of friends where everyone is awaiting the same information via text you know that despite the sender pushing send at the same time...the text may arrive on one person’s phone before another, even when sitting right next to each other. That was the case in the waiting room.....we all had phones, but one grandparent got the text first and read it and we all went, REALLY, for real a girl?? 

Despite the fact that our sweet grand daughter wanted to arrive 5 weeks early, she weighed in at 4’12” and only had to spend 8 days in the hospital.  She must have known how excited we all were and we wanted to be able to hold her sooner than later.  

After 2 nights in the neonatal ICU, where she had wonderful care and reassuring doctors and nurses, she was moved to the Special Care Nursery where we were allowed to hold her and feed her and gaze upon her in wonder.   Just think four doting grandparents who all wanted to hold her....we should have had quadruplets.  

After a few days of “feeding and growing”  she was discharged and I am happy to report she is now a whopping 5 lbs of pure joy. She is home with her parents and thriving.    

What a gift to watch your own children begin their parenting journey. I am doing the best I can to “keep quiet” and just enjoy being a grandmother...sometimes not easy but trying. Parenting never ends....especially when you are a mom. I can’t wait to take a grand daughter shopping, put bows in her hair and have tea parties, and all of the things my boys just didn’t want to do. We are tickled PINK!!!

Daily Dose

Early Talkers

1.15 to read

Is your child a precocious talker?  Most children start to acquire words around 12-15 months, but that means 5-10 words and building. By the time a child is 18 months old they are often mimicking when you ask them to say a word, and some are putting 2 words together. This is all very normal development. But there are few children who are just “early talkers” who are speaking in full sentences by the time they are 18-24 months! 

I think having such a verbal child during the early toddler years is both a “blessing and a curse”. I know that from raising my own children, where my oldest was quite verbal by 20 months, and was “bossing us around” before age 2!!  I also see this same dilemma in my little patients.  While some parents are worried that their 2 year old does not put 3-4 words together, others want to know how you can stop the chatter.  Parents.....we always have issues. 

Example:  When I come into the exam room for a 2 year old check up, the precocious talker looks up and says, “Hi Dr. Sue...what took you so long?”.  Or they may tell their parent that they “don’t need any help” as I ask them to climb on the exam table. Recently a little boy looked right at his mother and said, “I’ve got this”, when I asked him to take off his shoes.  

On another day a little girl was impatient to leave and kept asking her mother if they could go to the park after they left my office.  The mother kept telling the little girl, “maybe” . Finally, exasperated, the 2 year old said, “what’s the answer, yes or no?””  How do you keep a straight face? 

A verbal child can bring you to your knees, both laughing and sometimes wanting to cry.  How can a 2 year old know just what to say to make a parent feel inadequate?  Is it inborn? This seems to be especially true if you have had another child and the 2 year old is instructing you on how to parent “their baby”.   

So, if your child is a talker write down all of those clever sentences they blurt out......one day you will look back and laugh.  I often saw myself in my 2 year old as he told complete strangers , “my mommy says my baby brother cries all of the time, and he has colic!”  Out of the mouth of babes, and I still remember it.  Bittersweet.

Daily Dose

Children & Thunderstorms

1:15 to read

It is not uncommon for young children to be afraid of thunder and lightening.We had big thunderstorms in our area last night. The skies were filled with lightening, huge claps of thunder, loud winds and torrential rain. While the storms only last for a short time it was enough to wake up the dog and I watched and listened as she ran for cover beneath our bed and curl up in the "dog" fetal position. She is really afraid of storms and didn't come out for hours.

This reminded me of the many times that our children would come running to our room during a thunderstorm and also curl up (great cuddle time) afraid of the lightening and thunder. It is not uncommon for young children to be afraid of thunder and lightening. It is usually loud and dark, two things that are both often scary to young kids. It often awakens them from sleep causing further disorientation. The blowing wind only makes it seem scarier as the tree limbs hit the roof and the rain seems like it will blow through the walls. Throw in a little hail and you have the makings for many scared children.

When your children are old enough, get some library books and read about thunderstorms. It is a great time to learn a little about the weather. They love understanding different types of clouds, why it hails and learning to count the time between the thunder and lightening. Having the knowledge of what is happening is empowering and often makes a thunderstorm less frightening. There are even storybooks for children in the toddler age, with characters that are afraid of storms too, which helps a child work through their own fears. Funny thing, as children get older they usually like the storms and want to watch the weather change. Before you know it they are teens and believe it or not, they sleep through anything.

That's your daily dose, we'll chat again tomorrow. 

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Daily Dose

Kids & Too Much TV

1.00 to read

Another new study has just been released which confirms that children are getting close to 4 hours of background TV noise each day. While many parents are aware of the need to limit their children’s active screen time (which includes TV, video game, telephone texting and computer screens) to no more than 2 hours per day, background TV time may be equally important. The American Academy of Pediatrics also discourages any TV viewing for children under age 2 years. 

The study from The University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication defines background TV as “TV that is on in the vicinity of the child that the child is not attending to”.  The research looked at TV exposure in 1,454 households with children aged 8 months-8 years. The study found that younger children and African-American kids were exposed to more background TV than other children.  Having background TV noise of any kind can disrupt mental tasks for all and may also interfere with language development in younger children. 

Those households that had the least background TV exposure were those that did not have a TV in the child’s room!! That doesn’t seem to be a surprising finding at all. Many parents leave the TV on in a child’s room to help them sleep, although there are numerous studies to show exactly the opposite effect, TV disrupts sleep. I now routinely ask every parent during their child’s check up if there is a TV in the child’s room. I also ask every older child the same question, and there are many teens who are not happy with me when I encourage their parents to take the TV out of the bedroom of their adolescent. There is just no need to have a TV in the bedroom of children of any age.  I have given up on this discussion with my college aged patients! 

While many parents are doing a good job of monitoring what their children are watching on TV, and how long they are watching, we may not be doing as well when it comes to background TV.  While older kids hear news stories or language that they needn’t be exposed to, a younger child’s language skills may be delayed due to background TV noise. 

So, the kitchen TV needn’t be on while you are making your children their breakfast before school or in the evening while eating dinner. Family dinner is one of the most important times of the day and conversation is the key. No one needs to try to talk over the TV, just turn it off! 

Lastly, keep reading those bedtime stories for children of all ages; this is key to language, and appropriate language at that. 

That’s your daily dose for today.  We’ll chat again tomorrow.

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