Daily Dose

A Baby Girl!

1.15 to read

Did you hear my big news?? I am officially a grandmother of a new “premature” but healthy baby girl!!! Yes a GIRL!!  After raising three sons I really thought I had mistaken the text announcing a baby girl.   As you probably know, all important information is now received via a text.....so as all four first time grandparents sat in the labor and delivery waiting room one of us got the text that read.....healthy but tiny baby girl...all good!! 

Now, if you have ever sat with a group of friends where everyone is awaiting the same information via text you know that despite the sender pushing send at the same time...the text may arrive on one person’s phone before another, even when sitting right next to each other. That was the case in the waiting room.....we all had phones, but one grandparent got the text first and read it and we all went, REALLY, for real a girl?? 

Despite the fact that our sweet grand daughter wanted to arrive 5 weeks early, she weighed in at 4’12” and only had to spend 8 days in the hospital.  She must have known how excited we all were and we wanted to be able to hold her sooner than later.  

After 2 nights in the neonatal ICU, where she had wonderful care and reassuring doctors and nurses, she was moved to the Special Care Nursery where we were allowed to hold her and feed her and gaze upon her in wonder.   Just think four doting grandparents who all wanted to hold her....we should have had quadruplets.  

After a few days of “feeding and growing”  she was discharged and I am happy to report she is now a whopping 5 lbs of pure joy. She is home with her parents and thriving.    

What a gift to watch your own children begin their parenting journey. I am doing the best I can to “keep quiet” and just enjoy being a grandmother...sometimes not easy but trying. Parenting never ends....especially when you are a mom. I can’t wait to take a grand daughter shopping, put bows in her hair and have tea parties, and all of the things my boys just didn’t want to do. We are tickled PINK!!!

Daily Dose

Kids Who Snore

1.30 to read

Does your child snore?  If so, have you discussed their snoring with your pediatrician.  A recent study published in Pediatrics supported the routine screening and tracking of snoring among preschoolers.  Pediatricians should routinely be inquiring about your child’s sleep habits, as well as any snoring that occurs on a regular basis, during your child’s routine visits.  

Snoring may be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea and/or sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and habitual snoring has been associated with both learning and behavioral problems in older children. But this study was the first to look at preschool children between the ages of 2-3 years.

The study looked at 249 children from birth until 3 years of age, and parents were asked report how often their child snored on a weekly basis at both 2 and 3 years of age.  Persistent snorers were defined as those children who snored more than 2x/week at both ages 2 and 3.  Persistent loud snoring occurred in 9% of the children who were studied.

The study then looked at behavior and as had been expected persistent snorers had significantly worse overall behavioral scores.  This was noted as hyperactivity, depression and attentional difficulties.  Motor development did not seem to be impacted by snoring.

So, intermittent snoring is  common in the 2 to 3 year old set and does not seem to be associated with any long term behavioral issues. It is quite common for a young child to snore during an upper respiratory illness as well .  But persistent snoring needs to be evaluated and may need to be treated with the removal of a child’s adenoids and tonsils.

If you are worried about snoring, talk to your doctor. More studies are being done on this subject as well, so stay tuned.

Daily Dose

Busy Sports Schedules

1:30 to read

I can’t get over how many of my young patients who play sports tell me that they are up late at night during the school week due to their soccer schedule, or who miss church on Sunday due to a soccer or baseball game. Not only are kids starting organized sports at younger and younger ages (soccer for 3 year olds, flag football at 5?), the commitment to practice or play at what I would term “inappropriate” times seems to be more prevalent and absurd to me.

The mother of a 10 year old boy called me recently to discuss how upset and tearful her son had been since school has started.  Upon further questioning it seems that he had joined a fall baseball team and some of their games are scheduled on school nights at 8 pm....which means they don’t even get home until 10:30 or 11:00 pm?  When my own sons were playing high school sports I was not thrilled about Thursday evening JV games and how late we got home....but elementary school?  Of course, her son was exhausted and then he would get anxious about getting his homework done before hand and getting to bed so late and then being able to get up in the morning etc. etc.  She said that he now wanted to “quit playing baseball”, and cried every time he had to practice.

She was trying to explain to him that he had made a commitment to his team and needed to finish out the season, which I agree is an important life lesson about following through.  At the same I totally understand how upset he is that he has to stay up past his usual school night bedtime. It is not uncommon for some children to get very tearful when they are just exhausted...same for adults.

So how do you rationalize teaching your child about loyalty to their team and commitment when adults make up crazy schedules requiring young kids to stay up past an appropriate bedtime, or forgoing Sunday school if that is what they typically do on Sunday morning rather than going to a scheduled soccer game?

Hard for me to figure out how to “fix” this situation until enough parents say..”we will not let our children participate on the team unless the schedule is appropriate for their age”.  

Have you had any similar experiences? What do you think?

 

Daily Dose

Do Essential Oils Boost Immune System?

1.30 to read

Although it is still hot and officially summer, soon everyone will be heading back to school  and coughs and colds (and eventually flu, another topic) will be just around the corner. I had a patient ask me about the use of essential oils. Her 2 1/2 year old daughter is heading to preschool for the first time and she “had heard from her friends that essential oils help a child’s immunity during cold season”.

Unfortunately, there is very little data at all to confirm that statement. I only wish that rubbing a bit of lavender oil on would help prevent the common cold. While it may smell great and be relaxing....there is no data that I can find to show that there is any reproducible science to the claims that essential oils boost the immune system.  

While I was researching I found many sites stating that “eucalyptus oil is an anti-viral” and “peppermint oil is an anti-pyretic (fever reducer)”.  Tea tree oil is touted as being “both anti -bacterial and anti-fungal” (I don’t know of other drugs that can claim both!).  But, I just don’t see any data to support all of this. 

The word essential refers to the essence of the plant the oil is derived from, rather than being “essential” to your health. While in most cases essential oils (which are highly concentrated) used as aromatherapy are not harmful for adults, it may be a different story in children, especially those under the age of 6. While labels may say  “natural” it may not always mean safe.  Many oils are poisonous if ingested and there have been reports of accidental overdoses in children with several different oils. In one report tea tree oil and lavender oil applied topically have been shown to cause breast enlargement in boys.  Oil of eucalyptus and peppermint are high in menthol and cineole.  These substances may cause children to become drowsy have decreased respirations.  While there are articles stating that the use of menthol (Vicks) on a child’s feet may be helpful during a cold for reducing a cough, do not use this if child is young enough to put their feet in their mouths. 

I must say that I sometime use a few drops of eucalyptus oil in the shower when I have a cold as I think it smells great and seems to help “open up” my head. Whether this is in “my mind” or a response from my olfactory centers which sends calming messages to respiratory center is not clear. But, I am not ingesting it or using it topically. 

 

 

Daily Dose

Do Your Kids Drink Milk?

1:30 to read

I have noticed over my years in practice that fewer and fewer patients  drink milk every day. You may wonder why I ask the question, “does your child drink milk?”.  Calcium is an important nutrient which in necessary for healthy bones. But you have to put that calcium into your bones when you are a child and adolescent which means milk at meals. By age 18 years about 90% of your peak bone mass has been laid down.

Most children that I see are not drinking many soft drinks...in fact, many tell me they don’t like “fizzy drinks” at all...even on special occasions they would prefer “fancy waters”.  But, when I ask them what they drink at dinner they often say, “water”. I then ask their parents if they even pour milk for their children and they too say their child prefers water.

I am not sure how water became the preferred drink among many of my patients. When and how did parents and children decide that children need to drink a certain amount of water a day. I have never found any recommendations about water consumption in healthy children.  But there are recommendations regarding calcium and Vitamin D intake.

Children between 1-3 years of age need 700 mg/day of calcium, while 4-8 year olds need 1,000mg/day and 9-18 year olds need 1,300mg/day.  It is also recommended that all children between ages 1-18 years receive 600IU of vitamin D a day.  The best way to meet calcium and vitamin D needs is through food sources, including milk.  

With statistics showing that less than 15% of adolescent girls in the United States meet the recommended dietary allowance for calcium, many young girls may be setting themselves up for osteopenia and osteoporosis in their adult years. 

Exercise is equally important for maintaining bone health...which means more time outside or in the gym, rather than in front of a screen!

Change your habits and start pouring milk with your child’s meals and then go outside and get some vitamin D and exercise.

Daily Dose

Booster Shots

1:00 to read

Under the heading “kids say the smartest things” comes one of the latest entries!! I was seeing a 4 year old for their check up...this is a great age as most kids are very conversational and engaged and most are over their fear of the doctor.  I think “Doc McStuffins” has helped this out as well. Thank you Doc!

So, if you didn’t know it, 4-5 year olds get immunized before they start kindergarten.  I give 4 year olds their DTaP, IPV, MMR and Varicella vaccine, all in preparation for school.After a wonderful chatty and interactive visit, I always find it hard to now tell this precious child that at the end of the visit they are going to get some “vaccinations”.  Many times, in fact most, the idea of shots does not go over well.

Last week I saw this 4 year old, had a great visit, talked all about school and his soccer team and his new bike and bike helmet, only to end with “you are going to get several shots to keep you healthy”.  Then you wait for the reaction, right?

So, this little boy looked me right in the eye and said, “I get shots to protect and help my immune system!”.  What a smart kid! I think he is going to be an immunologist one day and save the world. I couldn’t be happier that he already understands re-boosting immunity.  

Daily Dose

Wheezing Season is Here

1:30 to read

Have you ever heard your child wheeze?  As cough and cold season gets into full swing I am going to see more and more children and many parents who will say, “I think my child is wheezing”.  Wheezing is a distinct sound that is heard during expiration and unfortunately is often not audible without a stethoscope. Many parents mistakenly hear the raspy upper airway noises from mucous in a child’s throat and think this is wheezing, which thankfully is not the case.

Wheezing is one of the most common reasons children are seen in the pediatric office during the winter months when RSV (respiratory syncitial virus), rhinovirus, and parainfluenza viruses all circulate...not to mention influenza.  Not all children who wheeze will go on to develop asthma but having a parent who wheezes and has allergies does put a child at greater risk for having asthma. 

Asthma is not a singular disease but rather a complex of symptoms which causes constriction of the airway smooth muscles, inflammation of the airway, mucous production and swelling that leads to air trapping.  This then results in coughing, wheezing, chest tightness,  prolonged exhalation and shortness of breath. For a young child the first symptoms of wheezing may be a persistent short, tight cough that occurs day and night without relief.

If you do think your child is wheezing you must always watch for ANY respiratory distress, or work of breathing!!!  You should never see your child’s ribs pulling in or out and they should always appear to be comfortable with breathing. You must look at their chest rather than just listen to their coughs.  Visual is just as important as the audible noise.

Like many things, there is not a specific test for diagnosing asthma. For a child who is initially found to be wheezing the first line of treatment is typically an inhaler or nebulizer with a bronchodilator to open up the tightened airways. For a young child it is often easier to use the nebulizer but once a child is older and a bit more cooperative an inhaler with a spacer is often less cumbersome and more convenient to use. When used appropriately the spacer/inhaler has been show to be equally effective.

If you are worried about your child’s breathing it is always a good idea to call your pediatrician to discuss. 

Daily Dose

Getting Your Baby to Sleep!

1:30 to read

Did you know one of the biggest Google internet searches for parents revolves around “how do I get my baby to sleep?”  I guess that any new parent in the middle of the night is online searching for “THE ANSWER”, so of course you “Google it”!

Now that we are grandparents and the baby is about 6 weeks old (although technically she is a week old, as she was 5 weeks early) my son is also looking for answers on the internet to that same question....how to make her sleep, so I can too! He even asked me if their was “magic” to this?

If only there was an answer on Google or in any book. It just takes time and every baby is different.   I guess there are some babies that sleep through the night from the time they get home from the hospital, but I have never seen one.  I think some parents just forget that at some time or another they were up at night with a newborn.

A newborn baby does not understand circadian rhythm and they are really not “trying” to keep parents up at night.  It takes weeks for a newborn to even begin to have some “routine” to their day and I try never to use the word “schedule” when discussing a newborn.  A baby is not a robot, they do not eat every 3 hours and then sleep for 3 more before eating again. They are “little people” and their tummies sometimes need to eat in 2 hours and then later it may be 3 hours before another feeding.  Don’t you sometimes eat an early lunch one day and a later lunch the next? 

But by trying to awaken the baby throughout the day and offering a feeding every 2-3 hours you will hopefully notice after several weeks that your baby is eating more often during the day and suddenly may thrill you and sleep 4 hours at night. it just takes time....YOU cannot make it happen.  I tease new parents that awakening a newborn during the day and prayer is about all you can do....all babies do eventually sleep, but it may not be right after you get them home from the hospital...think several months (as in 2-4) and you will be happy if it happens sooner.

Lastly, with all of the tech in the room, don’t pick up your baby in the middle of the night if they are just “squirming” around. Babies are notoriously loud sleepers and if they are not crying let them be and you may be surprised that they arouse and went back to sleep. If your baby cries you absolutely go get them and console them and feed them too if it is time. An infant should not be left to cry. 

This too shall pass and sleep will come, but there will be new stages down the road that will keep parents up at night, of that you can be assured. Comes with the territory.

Daily Dose

The Difference Between Cradle Cap And Dandruff

1.15 to read

I recently received a question from a Twitter follower related to cradle cap and dandruff. She wanted to know if there was a difference in the two.

You know there really isn’t as they are both due to seborrheic dermatitis, an inflammatory condition of the skin in which the skin overproduces skin cells and sebum (the skins natural oil). Cradle cap is the term used for the scaly dermatitis seen on the scalp in infants. It is also seen on the eyelids, eyebrows, and behind the ears. It is typically seen after about three months of age and will often resolve on its own by the time a baby is eight to 12 months old. It is usually simply a “cosmetic” problem for a baby as it looks like a yellowish plaque on a baby’s scalp and is often not even noticed by anyone other than the parents. Unlike seborrheic dermatitis in adults, cradle cap typically doesn’t itch. It is thought that cradle cap may occur in infancy due to hormonal influences from the mother that were passed across the placenta to the baby. These hormones cause the sebaceous glands to become over active. In some severe cases an infant’s scalp becomes really scaly and inflamed and causes even more parental concern, as it appears that the infant is uncomfortable and may be trying to scratch their head by rubbing it on surfaces. The treatment for cradle cap is to wash the baby’s scalp daily with a mild shampoo and then to use a soft comb or brush to help remove the scales once they have been loosened with washing. When washing the head make sure to get the shampoo behind the ears and in the brows (keeping the soap out of baby’s eyes). This is usually sufficient treatment for most cradle cap. In situations where the greasy scales seem to be worsening it may help to put a small amount of mineral oil or olive oil on the baby’s head and let it sit (I left a small amount on my children’s heads overnight) and then to shampoo the following day. The oil will help the scales to loosen up and come off more easily. For babies that have very inflamed irritated cradle cap a visit to your pediatrician may be warranted to confirm the diagnosis. In persistent cases I often recommend shampooing several times a week with a dandruff shampoo that has either selenium (Selsun) or zinc pyrithione (Head and Shoulders) making sure not to get any in the infant’s eyes. I may then also use a hydrocortisone cream or foam on the scalp that will lessen the inflammation and itching. In these cases it may take several weeks to totally clear up the problem. As children get older, especially during puberty, you may see a return of seborrhea as dandruff. Again you can use dandruff shampoos. It also seems that with the overproduction of sebum there is an overgrowth of a fungus called “malessizia” so using a shampoo for dandruff as well as a antifungal shampoo (Nizoral) often works. I have teens alternate different shampoos, as sometimes it seems to work better than always using the same shampoo for months on end. Teens don’t like white flakes falling from their scalp and unlike a baby, a teen is worried about the cosmetic issues of seborrhea! That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

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DR SUE'S DAILY DOSE

Kids are too busy and it's curbing their development