Daily Dose

Uber & Teens

1:30 to read

Do you have Uber cars in your area?  I first found out about Uber (and I am only using them as an example) when my son lived in NYC and often used the car service. Later on I heard about college kids using Uber as well.  In that case, many college kids did not have cars and/or they were being “responsible” after being at a party.

But recently, in conversations with my adolescent patients, I have heard that high school kids are using Uber to come home after a party, or other social activities. In otherwords, their parents are not picking them up from the dance, concert, or party but are letting their children (often young girls) call Uber.  Where are their parents and what are they thinking?

I realize that once your child heads off to college you hope and pray that they are making good choices and are being safe. You don’t really plan on picking them up after an event or talk to them that same night about what they have been doing and with whom.  But when we had high school age children, my expectations were that we, the parents, were responsible for taking our teens to the party and to pick them up. Once they were driving the “rules” changed a bit in that they were then often driving themselves to an event and then would drive home and we would be up waiting for them to get home.  They always knew that we would be there when they got home and also that if there were any “issues” we were also available to pick them up. We talked a lot about underage drinking as well as driving and responsibility.  Never did I think they would call a cab or car service, nor was that idea ever broached, they were to call their parents.

So now that these “app” car services are available around the clock, are parents abrogating their responsibilities for parenting teens?  By allowing their teens to call a car service for their ride home, are parents seemingly not interested in where their child has been or who they have been with or what they have been doing before they get home?  You certainly can drop your child at a concert or party and tell them to text Uber to get a ride home, but does this parental non-participation quietly help to condone inappropriate, risky, teen behavior?

Although picking your child up at the end of the evening or checking on them when they pull in the driveway will never ensure that your teen does not get into trouble, I think it does help them think a bit more about having to interact with their parents at curfew time. This “worry” might help lead them to make a better decision about drugs, alcohol or whom they are hanging out with. Putting teens into the “hands” (cars) of strangers as their ride home just seems wrong. Parents be aware. 

Daily Dose

Kids Are Stressed Out!

1:30 to read

Gone are the “lazy days of summer” and with school back in session the words “stress” and “anxiety” slowly creep back into the day to day language of many families.  In fact, a recent national We MD survey about children and stress found “that most parents rate school and friends as the biggest source of stress in their kids’ lives”.  The survey also found that “72% of children have negative behaviors linked to stress, and 62% have physical symptoms such as headaches and stomachaches”.

So, after reading this survey it only served to confirm what I have been seeing in my practice for years….very anxious, worried and stressed children of all ages.  I can attest to the fact that it is definitely affecting younger and younger children. Much of my general practice now involves more psychiatry than infectious disease (thank goodness for immunizations!).

I have watched younger and younger children come into my office and talk to me about “worries” over tests, reading levels and how they will possibly “get to college”.  Remember the days when you did not know what a SAT or ACT was until you were in the 11th grade? There was no test prep either, other than your parents telling you “you need a good night’s sleep and breakfast”, and  then they handed you 2 number 2 pencils as you walked out the door!!  Just last week an 8 year old patient of mine told me about his recent birthday party and playing video games.  He followed up by saying, “school starts in 2 days and my Mom says I cannot play video games of watch TV during the school week this year”.  I really didn’t think that was such a bad idea, but he then told me the reason was that he “had failed his ERB tests!!!”. He then went on to explain, in great detail I might add, that these had just been “practice ERB’s” and that his reading comprehension was “below grade level”.  He said “next year in 2nd grade these tests count so he was worried about doing well then.”  School had not even started yet!

I also received an email this week from a patient who said her son had just started  back to school 2 days previously and he was having anxiety and not wanting to go to school. He is in middle school at a rigorous private school and had already been diagnosed with ADHD when he was younger, and is on medication.  She and her husband were now having “issues” about how to deal with his anxiety, which was causing the entire family stress. They really “did not want to change his school”.  Not a good way to start off the school year. 

Much of the anxiety I see may also be related to just being “over scheduled”.  Children of all ages need some “down-time” to just “chill”, relax, kick back and even get a bit bored.  With schools piling on more and more academics at younger and younger ages, and then throw in competitive sports for 3-4 year olds….what are we thinking?  Of course children will get burned out and stressed…they are just developmentally too young for some of this.  Not all children are ready to read when 4-5 years old, or ready for athletic practices 2-3x/week. Some children as young as 8 have athletic events starting at 8 pm, when they should be in bed.

Sadly, I know that I will begin to see my fair share of headaches, tummy aches, and “I just don’t feel well” in the coming weeks. It may be time to re-evaluate where our society is heading.  

Daily Dose

Lice is Tough to Treat

1:15 to read

School is just back in session and we will start to see lice heading back to school as well!!  The good news is: lice are obligate parasites and don’t jump, or fly…they are transmitted by direct contact.  But, the smart louse has found another way to drive parents crazy…they are becoming more and more resistant to all of the over the counter products containing permethrin. 

A recent study has shown that 25 states now have a big problem with lice and permethrin resistance.  It seems that the lice are smart and they have developed “genetic mutations” which has made them drug resistant. Texas has had a problem for several years and I have had many patients coming into the office with bags full of “stuff” that they have used to treat their children’s head lice to no avail!!!  Many a mother has told me she is ready to try anything…including some things that might be considered unsafe, but you know a desperate mother.

While about 12 million children a year get head lice, the louse itself does not cause any disease, but just uncomfortable itching.  Parents spend multi millions of dollars each year trying to eradicate head lice. In states like Texas, California, Florida and Virginia the lice are immune to over the counter products, while in New York, New Jersey and several other states they are partially resistant. 

But don’t despair, despite the resistance to the over the counter products such as Nix, there are other prescription products available. Products such as benzoyl alcohol (Ulesfia), ivermectin (Sklice), malathion (Ovide), and spinosad (Natroba), may all be used to treat a case of head lice, but will require a prescription to obtain them.  Although prescription drugs typically are more expensive, treating head lice with an over the counter product may be an exercise in futility. It is likely to be more cost and time effective to start with a prescription product if you live in one of the 25 states which has shown drug resistance.

So, if you get a note that your child has head lice, pick up the phone and call your doctor’s office to see what advice they give you. 

Daily Dose

Why Vitamin D is Important!

1:30 to read

As a follow up to the blog last week on children, calcium and vitamin D needs, a recent article in a Canadian Medical Journal reports that children who drink non-cow’s milk, such as soy, rice, almond and goat’s milk have lower serum vitamin D levels than those who are drinking vitamin D fortified cow’s milk.

This study looked at 2800 children between 1-6 year olds, and their consumption of either cow’s milk which is all vitamin D fortified and those who drank non-cow’s milk, in which case fortification is voluntary.  The researchers then looked at blood samples to measure vitamin D levels.

The researchers found that children who drank non-cow’s milk had nearly three times the risk for having low vitamin D levels.

So...bottom line...when I am discussing milk and dairy intake with families I am going to reiterate the need to drink cow’s milk, or children may need to continue vitamin D supplementation  and for most parents, including myself, it is hard to remember to give a vitamin or mineral supplement every day for a child’s entire life!).  A glass of vitamin D fortified milk at meals seems an easier choice in most cases.

Daily Dose

Treating Bee Stings

Bee stings are a right of passage during childhood, always memorable, but never fun.I was outside today and noticed that the bees are back, pollinating the flowers in my garden, but ready to sting too if they are crossed by bare feet or errant hands. Bee stings are a right of passage during childhood, always memorable, but never fun. Our office receives numerous calls about how to handle a bee sting. First thing is to get some ice or a cool compress on the sting, which relives both PAIN and swelling.

While the ice is working you can take a peek and see if the stinger is still in the skin, and if so do not go grab tweezers or your fingernails to try and remove the stinger. If you do that you will only make the sting worse. The best way to remove the stinger is by using the edge of a credit card to gently scrape the stinger out of the skin. Honey Bees leave behind their stinger while wasps and hornets do not. Unless the child is allergic to bee stings most people will only have a local reaction. If there are any symptoms associated with the sting such as swelling of face, mouth, lips, or difficulty swallowing or breathing, give an immediate dose of Benadryl (diphenhydramine) while calling 911. If the child has a known bee hypersensitivity and they have an epi pen you will need to use it and also call 911. For local reactions after the sting is cleaned you can apply calamine lotion or a topical steroid cream. For swelling and discomfort a dose of Benadryl is also recommended, as well as a pain reliever like ibuprofen which will also relieve local inflammation along with pain relief. The sting is usually not uncomfortable for more than 24 hours. Make sure to watch for signs of infection with increasing redness, streaking or pain at the site of the sting. If the area seems to be getting worse rather than better it is a good idea to let you pediatrician take a peek. That's your daily dose for today, we'll chat again tomorrow.

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Daily Dose

The Difference Between Cradle Cap And Dandruff

1.15 to read

I recently received a question from a Twitter follower related to cradle cap and dandruff. She wanted to know if there was a difference in the two.

You know there really isn’t as they are both due to seborrheic dermatitis, an inflammatory condition of the skin in which the skin overproduces skin cells and sebum (the skins natural oil). Cradle cap is the term used for the scaly dermatitis seen on the scalp in infants. It is also seen on the eyelids, eyebrows, and behind the ears. It is typically seen after about three months of age and will often resolve on its own by the time a baby is eight to 12 months old. It is usually simply a “cosmetic” problem for a baby as it looks like a yellowish plaque on a baby’s scalp and is often not even noticed by anyone other than the parents. Unlike seborrheic dermatitis in adults, cradle cap typically doesn’t itch. It is thought that cradle cap may occur in infancy due to hormonal influences from the mother that were passed across the placenta to the baby. These hormones cause the sebaceous glands to become over active. In some severe cases an infant’s scalp becomes really scaly and inflamed and causes even more parental concern, as it appears that the infant is uncomfortable and may be trying to scratch their head by rubbing it on surfaces. The treatment for cradle cap is to wash the baby’s scalp daily with a mild shampoo and then to use a soft comb or brush to help remove the scales once they have been loosened with washing. When washing the head make sure to get the shampoo behind the ears and in the brows (keeping the soap out of baby’s eyes). This is usually sufficient treatment for most cradle cap. In situations where the greasy scales seem to be worsening it may help to put a small amount of mineral oil or olive oil on the baby’s head and let it sit (I left a small amount on my children’s heads overnight) and then to shampoo the following day. The oil will help the scales to loosen up and come off more easily. For babies that have very inflamed irritated cradle cap a visit to your pediatrician may be warranted to confirm the diagnosis. In persistent cases I often recommend shampooing several times a week with a dandruff shampoo that has either selenium (Selsun) or zinc pyrithione (Head and Shoulders) making sure not to get any in the infant’s eyes. I may then also use a hydrocortisone cream or foam on the scalp that will lessen the inflammation and itching. In these cases it may take several weeks to totally clear up the problem. As children get older, especially during puberty, you may see a return of seborrhea as dandruff. Again you can use dandruff shampoos. It also seems that with the overproduction of sebum there is an overgrowth of a fungus called “malessizia” so using a shampoo for dandruff as well as a antifungal shampoo (Nizoral) often works. I have teens alternate different shampoos, as sometimes it seems to work better than always using the same shampoo for months on end. Teens don’t like white flakes falling from their scalp and unlike a baby, a teen is worried about the cosmetic issues of seborrhea! That’s your daily dose, we’ll chat again tomorrow. Send your question to Dr. Sue!

Daily Dose

Kids Who Snore

1.30 to read

Does your child snore?  If so, have you discussed their snoring with your pediatrician.  A recent study published in Pediatrics supported the routine screening and tracking of snoring among preschoolers.  Pediatricians should routinely be inquiring about your child’s sleep habits, as well as any snoring that occurs on a regular basis, during your child’s routine visits.  

Snoring may be a sign of obstructive sleep apnea and/or sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and habitual snoring has been associated with both learning and behavioral problems in older children. But this study was the first to look at preschool children between the ages of 2-3 years.

The study looked at 249 children from birth until 3 years of age, and parents were asked report how often their child snored on a weekly basis at both 2 and 3 years of age.  Persistent snorers were defined as those children who snored more than 2x/week at both ages 2 and 3.  Persistent loud snoring occurred in 9% of the children who were studied.

The study then looked at behavior and as had been expected persistent snorers had significantly worse overall behavioral scores.  This was noted as hyperactivity, depression and attentional difficulties.  Motor development did not seem to be impacted by snoring.

So, intermittent snoring is  common in the 2 to 3 year old set and does not seem to be associated with any long term behavioral issues. It is quite common for a young child to snore during an upper respiratory illness as well .  But persistent snoring needs to be evaluated and may need to be treated with the removal of a child’s adenoids and tonsils.

If you are worried about snoring, talk to your doctor. More studies are being done on this subject as well, so stay tuned.

Daily Dose

ATV Accidents

1:15 to read

I had just recently read an article about “all-terrain vehicles” and helmet use, when I received a call that a friend had been involved in a accident on an ATV while on vacation.  One of those “odd” coincidences.  My friend suffered a punctured lung and broken ribs…..very lucky, and he was not wearing a helmet!

The CDC recently conducted a survey to estimate the frequency of ATV riding among kids between the ages of 12-17 years.  They found that about 25% of youths responded that they had ridden an ATV in the last year. Males were found to ride more frequently than females.

(not a surprise).  Geographically, there were more riders in the South, lower in the Northeast, and rural areas had more riders than urban areas.

But…only 45% of riders reported always wearing a helmet!! Twenty percent of riders reported wear a helmet “sometimes”, while 10% reported that they seldom wore and helmet and 25% admitted to NEVER wearing a helmet.  Interestingly, riders who rode more frequently were more likely to wear a helmet.

ATV accidents are quite common.  The AAP has advocated prohibiting the use of ATV’s by children under 16 years of age.  Statistically, between 20-25% of injuries and deaths secondary to an ATV accident are in children under the age of 16, with deadly ATV accidents peaking between 14-15. Head injuries occur in at least 60% of ATV deaths. Helmet use is associated with reduced risk of traumatic brain injuries, but unfortunately the CDC survey shows that many teens continue to ride without helmets.

It seems that many vacation destinations worldwide will often offer ATV excursions or rentals. Parents need to be aware of the risks involved while riding an ATV with their children or having their children driving one alone. As my own children used to say, “everything we think is fun, you think is dangerous”, and I am sure I said that many times. They have also ridden ATV’s and as far as I am aware always with a helmet.  

Whatever your views, parental supervision and helmet use is one way to help prevent serious injuries.  Be safe, listen to the rules of the road and wear a helmet! My friend was truly fortunate.

Daily Dose

A Baby Girl!

1.15 to read

Did you hear my big news?? I am officially a grandmother of a new “premature” but healthy baby girl!!! Yes a GIRL!!  After raising three sons I really thought I had mistaken the text announcing a baby girl.   As you probably know, all important information is now received via a text.....so as all four first time grandparents sat in the labor and delivery waiting room one of us got the text that read.....healthy but tiny baby girl...all good!! 

Now, if you have ever sat with a group of friends where everyone is awaiting the same information via text you know that despite the sender pushing send at the same time...the text may arrive on one person’s phone before another, even when sitting right next to each other. That was the case in the waiting room.....we all had phones, but one grandparent got the text first and read it and we all went, REALLY, for real a girl?? 

Despite the fact that our sweet grand daughter wanted to arrive 5 weeks early, she weighed in at 4’12” and only had to spend 8 days in the hospital.  She must have known how excited we all were and we wanted to be able to hold her sooner than later.  

After 2 nights in the neonatal ICU, where she had wonderful care and reassuring doctors and nurses, she was moved to the Special Care Nursery where we were allowed to hold her and feed her and gaze upon her in wonder.   Just think four doting grandparents who all wanted to hold her....we should have had quadruplets.  

After a few days of “feeding and growing”  she was discharged and I am happy to report she is now a whopping 5 lbs of pure joy. She is home with her parents and thriving.    

What a gift to watch your own children begin their parenting journey. I am doing the best I can to “keep quiet” and just enjoy being a grandmother...sometimes not easy but trying. Parenting never ends....especially when you are a mom. I can’t wait to take a grand daughter shopping, put bows in her hair and have tea parties, and all of the things my boys just didn’t want to do. We are tickled PINK!!!

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